General Della Rovere


2h 17m 1959

Brief Synopsis

A con man is captured by the Nazis during World War II and forced to enter a prison, posing as a captured general, to weed out rebel leaders of the Italian Resistasnce. Once there, however, he has a change of heart, joins the cause of the rebels, and awaits the price he will pay for it.

Film Details

Also Known As
El general de la Rovere, Generale Della Rovere, Il
Genre
Drama
War
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1959
Location
Milan, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

A con man is captured by the Nazis during World War II and forced to enter a prison, posing as a captured general, to weed out rebel leaders of the Italian Resistasnce. Once there, however, he has a change of heart, joins the cause of the rebels, and awaits the price he will pay for it.

Film Details

Also Known As
El general de la Rovere, Generale Della Rovere, Il
Genre
Drama
War
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1959
Location
Milan, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Award Nominations

Best Writing, Screenplay

1962

Articles

Il Generale Della Rovere on Blu-ray


1959's Il Generale Della Rovere is an atypical film for Roberto Rossellini. After his neo-realist beginnings and a multi-film collaboration with Ingrid Bergman, Rossellini was already turning away from feature entertainments, with a semi-documentary project filmed in India. Filmed mostly on studio sets, the film combines the wartime setting of Open City with the moral uplift of the Bergman films. The most accessible and conventional of his films, it was cultivated to be a hit, and make a strong showing at the Venice Film Festival. Actor-director Vittorio De Sica was chosen to star because he would appeal in other European countries besides France. As Rovere is so performance oriented, De Sica's creative contribution probably equals that of Rossellini.

The book by Indro Montanelli has its basis in real events. In wartime Genoa, gambler Emanuele Bardone (Vittorio De Sica) has subsisted by becoming a petty swindler, using bribes to a German staff clerk to buy the freedom of Italians suspected as partisans. Posing as a Colonel from the Great War and pretending to have real influence, Bardone overcharges the wealthy Chiara Fassio (Anne Vernon) for the promised release of her husband. He then gambles away the bribe money and tries to cover his losses by selling fake jewelry. When Bardone befriends the high-ranking German Colonel Mueller (Hannes Messemer), all of his problems seem to be over. But Mueller instead arrests the con man and gives him a choice: impersonate a dead Italian resistance organizer, the respected General Della Rovere, or be shot. Bardone finds himself in a German prison surrounded by genuine Italian heroes; to save his own life he's expected to act as a Judas and identify Rovere's contact man, the leader of the resistance.

Oddly celebrated as a return to Rossellini's roots in Italian neorealism, Il Generale Della Rovere is a tightly scripted story filmed with professional actors on studio sets. Rossellini's staging is conventional and he even uses a zoom lens in a couple of scenes. He match-cuts between his artificial settings and authentic film footage of war action and bombed streets. Yet the marvelous performances, particularly that of Vittorio De Sica, have an authenticity no 'realism' could provide.

Emanuele Bardone is a fascinating character, a reckless charlatan accustomed to lies and impersonations, fantasies that also make him feel good about himself. Posing as a WW1 veteran named "Colonel Grimaldi', he foolishly believes that he's helping the people he robs. Even with the privations of wartime Bardone manages to keep two girlfriends, the entertainer Valeria (Giovanna Ralli) and a prostitute, Olga (Sandra Milo). Olga's devotion to Emanuele is so great that she gives him money, rather than let him swindle the other girls in the brothel. Bardone is really swindling himself, thinking that he can gamble his way out of debt and square things with all the people he's harmed. He owns up to his true character only when Colonel Mueller reads his civilian rap sheet from before the war: "...thief, drug pusher...".

Forced to collaborate with the enemy, Bardone sees what conditions are like for political prisoners. Some are tortured and one commits suicide to avoid giving up information. For the first time Bardone is uncomfortable playing a 'theatrical' role. His fake general is treated as a VIP by the SS guards and their Italian stooges. He's mortified by the hurried messages he finds written on his cell walls, from men being called to be executed. The patriotic scribbles profess love for country and beg somebody to convey their feelings to their families. Bardone shouts out a patriotic speech to his fellow prisoners during an air raid -- mostly to calm his own nerves. How can he betray these men? How low can he allow himself to sink even lower?

Il Generale Della Rovere would seem a perfect role for Charles Chaplin, were the internationalist comic interested in a story about patriotism to a particular country. De Sica performs the role as would Chaplin post- Monsieur Verdoux. Both characters commit moral crimes to survive, but only the sentimental Bardone attempts to atone. De Sica had made the leading character of his own Miracle in Milan very Chaplinesque, and the Bardone character evolves from thoughtless selfishness to 'noble contrition' in much the same way a later Chaplin character might. He watches a common barber (Vittorio Caprioli) die rather than betray his country. Having assumed the role of the great General, Bardone is compelled to behave as the General would.

Anne Vernon (of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) makes a strong impression as Bardone's most wronged victim. A real Baronessa Bazzani performs without credit as Della Rovere's wife, who comes to the prison in hopes of seeing him. The SS Colonel played by Hans Messemer (The Great Escape) is unlike the vicious monsters Rossellini portrayed years earlier in Rome Open City. Colonel Mueller expresses regret for having to force men to talk, a script detail possibly encouraged by the commercial need to avoid offending German audiences. Mueller rightfully sees Bardone as an ideal chameleon to impersonate the near-legendary General; but doesn't take into account Bardone's capacity for patriotic feeling.

Roberto Rossellini's direction is always good for character. Many scenes are done in long takes, usually with camera motion. A roundup of prisoners near the end seems slow, as every faction represented (Communists, Jews, random arrestees) have their say. But an earlier scene in which Bardone is forced to face the sad people he has fleeced is better, mainly because De Sica has the floor and does most of the talking. Like Chaplin in Monsieur Verdoux, Rossellini purposely eschews emotional effects for his strongest scenes. The grim finish plays out in a wide shot. Rossellini made only a few more films before shifting over to a series of TV docudramas and miniseries, often about historical figures. His next picture Era notte a Roma (Escape by Night) is another story of the German occupation that reunited actors Giovanna Ralli and Hannes Messemer.

Raro Video's Blu-ray Remastered Edition of Il Generale Della Rovere reflects an Italian restoration done several years ago, and a different transfer than Criterion's earlier DVD from 2009. Setting this release apart is the inclusion of the restored cut of the version Rossellini screened at Venice in 1959. It is six minutes longer than the 132-minute theatrical cut, which is included as an extra.

The transfer is excellent in quality, with only the restored sections having more film grain; they were apparently taken from a surviving print. More puzzling is the flat aspect ratio, which is maintained at 1.33:1 for both versions, although the layout of the main titles and cameraman Carlo Carlini's compositions clearly point to a wider aspect ratio being correct. Even more curious is the fact that the entire frame has been scanned, resulting in a slightly window-boxed image that reveals the full camera gate, with bits of dirt clinging to the extremes of the image. The presentation would be much more focused had the unnecessary real estate below and above cropped away. Those prison cells have very high ceilings.

Raro's extras are also different from those on the Criterion disc. A long video essay (45 minutes) contains interview material with Roberto Rossellini's son Renzo and critic Adriano Aprá; the critic returns for more analysis of Rovere's mix of realism and artifice. A separate interview with Renzo Rossellini includes material used in the video essay. The original Italian trailer uses no scenes from the movie. It instead shows De Sica and Rossellini at the Venice Film Festival, where the director is seen accepting the Golden Lion award. Actor Hans Messemer also won a special mention for his performance.

By Glenn Erickson
Il Generale Della Rovere On Blu-Ray

Il Generale Della Rovere on Blu-ray

1959's Il Generale Della Rovere is an atypical film for Roberto Rossellini. After his neo-realist beginnings and a multi-film collaboration with Ingrid Bergman, Rossellini was already turning away from feature entertainments, with a semi-documentary project filmed in India. Filmed mostly on studio sets, the film combines the wartime setting of Open City with the moral uplift of the Bergman films. The most accessible and conventional of his films, it was cultivated to be a hit, and make a strong showing at the Venice Film Festival. Actor-director Vittorio De Sica was chosen to star because he would appeal in other European countries besides France. As Rovere is so performance oriented, De Sica's creative contribution probably equals that of Rossellini. The book by Indro Montanelli has its basis in real events. In wartime Genoa, gambler Emanuele Bardone (Vittorio De Sica) has subsisted by becoming a petty swindler, using bribes to a German staff clerk to buy the freedom of Italians suspected as partisans. Posing as a Colonel from the Great War and pretending to have real influence, Bardone overcharges the wealthy Chiara Fassio (Anne Vernon) for the promised release of her husband. He then gambles away the bribe money and tries to cover his losses by selling fake jewelry. When Bardone befriends the high-ranking German Colonel Mueller (Hannes Messemer), all of his problems seem to be over. But Mueller instead arrests the con man and gives him a choice: impersonate a dead Italian resistance organizer, the respected General Della Rovere, or be shot. Bardone finds himself in a German prison surrounded by genuine Italian heroes; to save his own life he's expected to act as a Judas and identify Rovere's contact man, the leader of the resistance. Oddly celebrated as a return to Rossellini's roots in Italian neorealism, Il Generale Della Rovere is a tightly scripted story filmed with professional actors on studio sets. Rossellini's staging is conventional and he even uses a zoom lens in a couple of scenes. He match-cuts between his artificial settings and authentic film footage of war action and bombed streets. Yet the marvelous performances, particularly that of Vittorio De Sica, have an authenticity no 'realism' could provide. Emanuele Bardone is a fascinating character, a reckless charlatan accustomed to lies and impersonations, fantasies that also make him feel good about himself. Posing as a WW1 veteran named "Colonel Grimaldi', he foolishly believes that he's helping the people he robs. Even with the privations of wartime Bardone manages to keep two girlfriends, the entertainer Valeria (Giovanna Ralli) and a prostitute, Olga (Sandra Milo). Olga's devotion to Emanuele is so great that she gives him money, rather than let him swindle the other girls in the brothel. Bardone is really swindling himself, thinking that he can gamble his way out of debt and square things with all the people he's harmed. He owns up to his true character only when Colonel Mueller reads his civilian rap sheet from before the war: "...thief, drug pusher...". Forced to collaborate with the enemy, Bardone sees what conditions are like for political prisoners. Some are tortured and one commits suicide to avoid giving up information. For the first time Bardone is uncomfortable playing a 'theatrical' role. His fake general is treated as a VIP by the SS guards and their Italian stooges. He's mortified by the hurried messages he finds written on his cell walls, from men being called to be executed. The patriotic scribbles profess love for country and beg somebody to convey their feelings to their families. Bardone shouts out a patriotic speech to his fellow prisoners during an air raid -- mostly to calm his own nerves. How can he betray these men? How low can he allow himself to sink even lower? Il Generale Della Rovere would seem a perfect role for Charles Chaplin, were the internationalist comic interested in a story about patriotism to a particular country. De Sica performs the role as would Chaplin post- Monsieur Verdoux. Both characters commit moral crimes to survive, but only the sentimental Bardone attempts to atone. De Sica had made the leading character of his own Miracle in Milan very Chaplinesque, and the Bardone character evolves from thoughtless selfishness to 'noble contrition' in much the same way a later Chaplin character might. He watches a common barber (Vittorio Caprioli) die rather than betray his country. Having assumed the role of the great General, Bardone is compelled to behave as the General would. Anne Vernon (of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) makes a strong impression as Bardone's most wronged victim. A real Baronessa Bazzani performs without credit as Della Rovere's wife, who comes to the prison in hopes of seeing him. The SS Colonel played by Hans Messemer (The Great Escape) is unlike the vicious monsters Rossellini portrayed years earlier in Rome Open City. Colonel Mueller expresses regret for having to force men to talk, a script detail possibly encouraged by the commercial need to avoid offending German audiences. Mueller rightfully sees Bardone as an ideal chameleon to impersonate the near-legendary General; but doesn't take into account Bardone's capacity for patriotic feeling. Roberto Rossellini's direction is always good for character. Many scenes are done in long takes, usually with camera motion. A roundup of prisoners near the end seems slow, as every faction represented (Communists, Jews, random arrestees) have their say. But an earlier scene in which Bardone is forced to face the sad people he has fleeced is better, mainly because De Sica has the floor and does most of the talking. Like Chaplin in Monsieur Verdoux, Rossellini purposely eschews emotional effects for his strongest scenes. The grim finish plays out in a wide shot. Rossellini made only a few more films before shifting over to a series of TV docudramas and miniseries, often about historical figures. His next picture Era notte a Roma (Escape by Night) is another story of the German occupation that reunited actors Giovanna Ralli and Hannes Messemer. Raro Video's Blu-ray Remastered Edition of Il Generale Della Rovere reflects an Italian restoration done several years ago, and a different transfer than Criterion's earlier DVD from 2009. Setting this release apart is the inclusion of the restored cut of the version Rossellini screened at Venice in 1959. It is six minutes longer than the 132-minute theatrical cut, which is included as an extra. The transfer is excellent in quality, with only the restored sections having more film grain; they were apparently taken from a surviving print. More puzzling is the flat aspect ratio, which is maintained at 1.33:1 for both versions, although the layout of the main titles and cameraman Carlo Carlini's compositions clearly point to a wider aspect ratio being correct. Even more curious is the fact that the entire frame has been scanned, resulting in a slightly window-boxed image that reveals the full camera gate, with bits of dirt clinging to the extremes of the image. The presentation would be much more focused had the unnecessary real estate below and above cropped away. Those prison cells have very high ceilings. Raro's extras are also different from those on the Criterion disc. A long video essay (45 minutes) contains interview material with Roberto Rossellini's son Renzo and critic Adriano Aprá; the critic returns for more analysis of Rovere's mix of realism and artifice. A separate interview with Renzo Rossellini includes material used in the video essay. The original Italian trailer uses no scenes from the movie. It instead shows De Sica and Rossellini at the Venice Film Festival, where the director is seen accepting the Golden Lion award. Actor Hans Messemer also won a special mention for his performance. By Glenn Erickson

il Generale Della Rovere - Vittorio De Sica in Roberto Rossellini's IL GENERALE DELLA ROVERE on DVD


Roberto Rossellini is now considered one of the greatest, if not the greatest Italian film director. In the interview extras for Criterion's new DVD Il Generale Della Rovere we learn that his movies were almost all box office failures. In 1959, after a number of unsuccessful films starring his wife Ingrid Bergman, Rossellini decided to return to the subject matter of his first success Rome, Open City. Rossellini and his star Vittorio De Sica determined to make a show that would win the top prize at the Venice Film Festival. They did just that.

Il Generale Della Rovere changed the way Italian films looked at WW2. Fourteen years after defeat, the public still expected the war to be depicted as a conflict between good Italians and bad Germans. Rovere shows Italian Fascists actively collaborating with their Nazi allies. The film's guilty, compromised protagonist only makes sense in an equally compromised political setting.

Author Indro Montanelli's downbeat but morally uplifting story has its basis in real events. In 1943 Genoa, with the Allies slowly advancing northward, gambler Emanuele Bardone (Vittorio De Sica) has become a petty swindler. Many Italians are desperate to free relatives arrested for desertion or political crimes. Posing as a Colonel from the Great War and pretending to have influence with the Germans, Bardone accepts money to be used for bribes. He gambles most of it away. To cover his losses, Bardone tries to sell a fake emerald to various merchants and old girlfriends, and arranges to overcharge the wealthy Chiara Fassio (Anne Vernon) for the promised release of her husband. Then Bardone befriends the high-ranking German Colonel Mueller (Hannes Messemer), which seems a stroke of luck until bad timing uncovers his entire scheme. Mueller offers Bardone three choices: a firing squad, a long prison term, or ... to spy for the Colonel in a political prison. Mueller wants Bardone to impersonate a dead Italian resistance organizer, the respected General Della Rovere, to identify and neutralize a top resistance operative.

Il Generale Della Rovere is a moving suspense thriller that focuses on moral choices instead of action. Rossellini doesn't attempt a naturalistic atmosphere. Decidedly non- neorealistic studio sets represent the bombed city, some offices and a prison cellblock. Grainy stock shots are cut into the film or used for shaky rear projection plates.

De Sica's "Colonel" Bardone is a peculiarly Italian character. Unlike Graham Greene's ultimately loathsome wartime opportunist Harry Lime, the charlatan Emanuele retains our sympathy even when committing completely unconscionable acts. Every Italian is forced to compromise "to get by" and Bardone's gambling habit simply gives him a heavier burden than most. He promises the moon to his sexy dancer girlfriend Valeria (Giovanna Ralli) so he can pawn her jewelry; she wisely hides her good stuff. Some easily charmed prostitutes almost buy Emanuele's ring. One of them (Sandra Milo) is an old lover aware that the ring is imitation. She breaks down and gives him what little money she has. His pride entirely gone, Bardone accepts the money, hoping to gamble it into the profit margin and cover his responsibilities. But his luck is as bad as ever.

With his cheap crimes exposed, Bardone is once again compelled to compromise his values and collaborate with the enemy. Forced to impersonate a man of integrity, the old cheat learns what it means to take personal responsibility for others. When he reads the scrawls left by condemned men on the walls of his cell, and sees a common barber (Vittorio Caprioli) die rather than betray his country, his conversion is complete. Il Generale Della Rovere finishes on a scene of selfless purity. Rather than go in for a heart-tugging close-up, Rossellini chooses to film it in one angle, from a respectful distance.

Vittorio De Sica plays the "principled swindler" Bardone almost as would Charlie Chaplin, effortlessly changing his personality to suit a variety of situations. Bardone's saving grace is that he becomes the roles he plays, a quality that De Sica communicates well. Second-billed Hannes Messemer breaks the mold of German officers in Italian films by coming off as a decent and principled man. His Colonel Mueller is perhaps a bit too sympathetic when he regretfully sends men to be tortured, "because they leave him no choice". Messemer continued playing German officers, most famously in John Sturges' 1963 The Great Escape. Anne Vernon makes a strong impression as Bardone's most wronged victim. Giovanna Ralli and Sandra Milo are women that he loves but disappoints. One key scene forces Bardone to face the people he's robbed and cheated. They're too cowed by the occupying Germans to speak up, and Rossellini doesn't emphasize their faces. Do they still regard Emanuele Bardone as someone who tried to help them, or are they memorizing his face for later reprisals?

Il Generale Della Rovere was a big hit for Roberto Rossellini. The next year he returned to the German Occupation for the realistic but surprisingly unemotional Era notte a Roma, bringing back Giovanna Ralli and Hannes Messemer.

Criterion's DVD of Il Generale Della Rovere is formatted at 1:33 when it looks as if a wider format was intended; the only scene that would seem to violate a 1:66 matte is a tacked-on opening card announcing the film's win at Venice. The image is pristine and the mono audio crystal clear.

Disc producer Issa Clubb has arranged four new interviews. Ingrid, Isabella and Renzo Rossellini talk about their father; Renzo served as a second unit assistant director on the film. Scholar Adriano Aprà offers a fourth interview, while Rossellini biographer Tag Gallagher narrates a well done visual essay on this section of Rossellini's career. The film's original trailer shows only newsreel footage of the film's triumph in Venice.

Future directors Ruggero Deodato and Tinto Brass were assistant directors as well, and the minor genre favorite Luciano Pigozzi has a small but memorable role as a prison inmate.

For more information about Il Generale Della Rovere, visit The Criterion Collection. To order Il Generale Della Rovere, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson

il Generale Della Rovere - Vittorio De Sica in Roberto Rossellini's IL GENERALE DELLA ROVERE on DVD

Roberto Rossellini is now considered one of the greatest, if not the greatest Italian film director. In the interview extras for Criterion's new DVD Il Generale Della Rovere we learn that his movies were almost all box office failures. In 1959, after a number of unsuccessful films starring his wife Ingrid Bergman, Rossellini decided to return to the subject matter of his first success Rome, Open City. Rossellini and his star Vittorio De Sica determined to make a show that would win the top prize at the Venice Film Festival. They did just that. Il Generale Della Rovere changed the way Italian films looked at WW2. Fourteen years after defeat, the public still expected the war to be depicted as a conflict between good Italians and bad Germans. Rovere shows Italian Fascists actively collaborating with their Nazi allies. The film's guilty, compromised protagonist only makes sense in an equally compromised political setting. Author Indro Montanelli's downbeat but morally uplifting story has its basis in real events. In 1943 Genoa, with the Allies slowly advancing northward, gambler Emanuele Bardone (Vittorio De Sica) has become a petty swindler. Many Italians are desperate to free relatives arrested for desertion or political crimes. Posing as a Colonel from the Great War and pretending to have influence with the Germans, Bardone accepts money to be used for bribes. He gambles most of it away. To cover his losses, Bardone tries to sell a fake emerald to various merchants and old girlfriends, and arranges to overcharge the wealthy Chiara Fassio (Anne Vernon) for the promised release of her husband. Then Bardone befriends the high-ranking German Colonel Mueller (Hannes Messemer), which seems a stroke of luck until bad timing uncovers his entire scheme. Mueller offers Bardone three choices: a firing squad, a long prison term, or ... to spy for the Colonel in a political prison. Mueller wants Bardone to impersonate a dead Italian resistance organizer, the respected General Della Rovere, to identify and neutralize a top resistance operative. Il Generale Della Rovere is a moving suspense thriller that focuses on moral choices instead of action. Rossellini doesn't attempt a naturalistic atmosphere. Decidedly non- neorealistic studio sets represent the bombed city, some offices and a prison cellblock. Grainy stock shots are cut into the film or used for shaky rear projection plates. De Sica's "Colonel" Bardone is a peculiarly Italian character. Unlike Graham Greene's ultimately loathsome wartime opportunist Harry Lime, the charlatan Emanuele retains our sympathy even when committing completely unconscionable acts. Every Italian is forced to compromise "to get by" and Bardone's gambling habit simply gives him a heavier burden than most. He promises the moon to his sexy dancer girlfriend Valeria (Giovanna Ralli) so he can pawn her jewelry; she wisely hides her good stuff. Some easily charmed prostitutes almost buy Emanuele's ring. One of them (Sandra Milo) is an old lover aware that the ring is imitation. She breaks down and gives him what little money she has. His pride entirely gone, Bardone accepts the money, hoping to gamble it into the profit margin and cover his responsibilities. But his luck is as bad as ever. With his cheap crimes exposed, Bardone is once again compelled to compromise his values and collaborate with the enemy. Forced to impersonate a man of integrity, the old cheat learns what it means to take personal responsibility for others. When he reads the scrawls left by condemned men on the walls of his cell, and sees a common barber (Vittorio Caprioli) die rather than betray his country, his conversion is complete. Il Generale Della Rovere finishes on a scene of selfless purity. Rather than go in for a heart-tugging close-up, Rossellini chooses to film it in one angle, from a respectful distance. Vittorio De Sica plays the "principled swindler" Bardone almost as would Charlie Chaplin, effortlessly changing his personality to suit a variety of situations. Bardone's saving grace is that he becomes the roles he plays, a quality that De Sica communicates well. Second-billed Hannes Messemer breaks the mold of German officers in Italian films by coming off as a decent and principled man. His Colonel Mueller is perhaps a bit too sympathetic when he regretfully sends men to be tortured, "because they leave him no choice". Messemer continued playing German officers, most famously in John Sturges' 1963 The Great Escape. Anne Vernon makes a strong impression as Bardone's most wronged victim. Giovanna Ralli and Sandra Milo are women that he loves but disappoints. One key scene forces Bardone to face the people he's robbed and cheated. They're too cowed by the occupying Germans to speak up, and Rossellini doesn't emphasize their faces. Do they still regard Emanuele Bardone as someone who tried to help them, or are they memorizing his face for later reprisals? Il Generale Della Rovere was a big hit for Roberto Rossellini. The next year he returned to the German Occupation for the realistic but surprisingly unemotional Era notte a Roma, bringing back Giovanna Ralli and Hannes Messemer. Criterion's DVD of Il Generale Della Rovere is formatted at 1:33 when it looks as if a wider format was intended; the only scene that would seem to violate a 1:66 matte is a tacked-on opening card announcing the film's win at Venice. The image is pristine and the mono audio crystal clear. Disc producer Issa Clubb has arranged four new interviews. Ingrid, Isabella and Renzo Rossellini talk about their father; Renzo served as a second unit assistant director on the film. Scholar Adriano Aprà offers a fourth interview, while Rossellini biographer Tag Gallagher narrates a well done visual essay on this section of Rossellini's career. The film's original trailer shows only newsreel footage of the film's triumph in Venice. Future directors Ruggero Deodato and Tinto Brass were assistant directors as well, and the minor genre favorite Luciano Pigozzi has a small but memorable role as a prison inmate. For more information about Il Generale Della Rovere, visit The Criterion Collection. To order Il Generale Della Rovere, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Co-Winner of the Golden Lion for Best Picture and Winner of the International Critics Prize and the Catholic Film Office Award at the 1959 Venice Film Festival.

Voted One of the Year's Five Best Foreign Films by the 1960 National Board of Review.

Voted One of the Year's Ten Best Foreign Films by the 1960 New York Times Film Critics.

Winner of the Best Film, Best Director, Best Actor (De Sica), Best Supporting Actor (Messemer), and Best Screenplay at the 1960 San Fransisco Film Festival.

Winner of the David di Donatello Award for Best Picture and the Blue Ribbon Award for Best Director by the Italian Film Academy, 1960.

Released in United States 1959

Released in United States 1960

Released in United States August 20, 1985

Shown at "Truffaut Plus", a Film Society of Lincoln Center Retrospective August 20, 1985.

Shown at the 1959 Venice Film Festival.

Shown at the 1960 San Francisco Fil Festival.

Released in United States 1959 (Shown at the 1959 Venice Film Festival.)

Released in United States 1960

Released in United States 1960 (Shown at the 1960 San Francisco Fil Festival.)

Released in United States August 20, 1985 (Shown at "Truffaut Plus", a Film Society of Lincoln Center Retrospective August 20, 1985.)