Foxy Brown


1h 34m 1974
Foxy Brown

Brief Synopsis

When a government agent is shot down, his sexy girlfriend goes gunning for revenge.

Photos & Videos

Foxy Brown - Movie Poster

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Crime
Action
Release Date
1974

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

A melange of sex, dope, violence, bondage, lesbian bar-brawling and fratrimutilation, and Black activism sets the stage for the investigations of the infamous pistol-packing Foxy Brown, who seeks sweet revenge on a slimy Madam.

Photo Collections

Foxy Brown - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for the grindhouse favorite, Foxy Brown (1974). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Crime
Action
Release Date
1974

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The Gist (Foxy Brown) - THE GIST


Jack Hill never could get any damn respect. A talented musician and arranger who wound up directing films indirectly, after pursuing a career in scoring them, Hill is one of the least celebrated dogbodies of the Roger Corman kennel. Unlike the upwardly mobile Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda and (to a lesser extent) Monte Hellman, Hill rarely gets lauded as an auteur of any stripe, much less name-checked outside of discussions of the exploitation and blaxploitation films for which he is most widely associated. Histories of independent film in the Sixties and Seventies don't include the work of Jack Hill, which is more than an injustice-it's an outright crime!

As one Internet critic so aptly put it, Hill's movies are worthwhile because they're always better than you think they're going to be. After doing piecework for Corman on such pictures as The Wasp Woman (1960), which he padded out with new scenes for TV, and Operation Titian (1963), an art forgery caper which he turned into an artist-goes-nuts psycho thriller (and which was shelved by Corman and recut as a vampire film!), Hill banged out the singularly oddball Spider Baby, or The Maddest Story Ever Told (shot in 1964, released only in 1968). Going a darker route on the weird family vogue of The Munsters and The Addams Family, Spider Baby offered a nuclear family on the cusp of meltdown that prefigured the cannibal clan of Tobe Hooper's The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) and its even money as to which clan is the more disturbing.

Although his name is as inextricably linked with blaxploitation as Jim Brown or Fred Williamson, Hill made only two features in that particular subgenre, both starring the iconic Pam Grier. Coffy (1973) was a woman's revenge picture about a grieving nurse going ballistic on the drug pushers who turned her teenage sister into a junkie. Inexplicably profitable, Coffy beget an immediate sequel, which Hill titled Burn, Coffy, Burn (in the declarative vein of the Blacula [1972] follow-up Scream, Blacula, Scream, 1973) until the bean counters at AIP decided sequels weren't good box office. Given very little prep time, Hill turned the aborted sequel into the stand-alone feature Foxy Brown (1974), which hit the grindhouses a mere ten months after Coffy's premiere. Foxy Brown (yes, that's what it says on her California driver's license) offers more of the same, with Hill working hard at nothing so much as out-doing himself and the original film's trademark audience-pleasing set pieces of ultra-violence.

As attested by Foxy Brown's opening titles (crafted without Hill's participation or consent), American International Pictures wanted a black female James Bond, although they offered up no additional funds to make it happen. Despite Coffy's wide profit margin, Hill was treated by the independent studio as the proverbial red-headed stepchild and given no bigger a budget (although both he and Pam Grier drew fatter paychecks). Consequently, Foxy Brown often looks cheap and down-at-heal, with the then-rundown Ambassador Hotel subbing for too many interiors and the film's only real flamboyance coming from the statuesque Grier, resplendent in her gull-wing collar Day-Glo blouses and rhinestone studded bib overalls. Throughout most of her career, Grier was more adept at being an icon than an actresses and her craft at times fails her here; asked to emote a combination of rage and grief, she merely seems pissed off, although she handles comic and action scenes deftly and is throughout a heroine worth whistling for. The sins perpetuated against Foxy (and by extension, Grier) still disturb today (as does Hill's politically incorrect dialogue) and there are few contemporary actresses who would put themselves through the gauntlet that Foxy endures on her rocky road to retribution.

The dynamite Willie Hutch score elevates the material, particularly the pedestrian cinematography of Brick Marquard. Jack Hill's hand (and eye) are conspicuous throughout-- as when one character's doom is nicely telegraphed by his passing an expired parking meter while two thugs draw a bead on him from behind. Hill modulates his outrages well, saving the best for last, as Foxy crashes a drug deal in a stolen airplane, julienning one villain in the propeller blades while leaving his boss to be emasculated by a cadre of Black Panther surrogates. Kudos to TV actor Peter Brown for making this notorious bit of business so richly deserved. One of three stars of the short-lived TV western Laredo, the hunky Brown makes his medallion-wearing mini-Machiavelli a thoroughly hateful character, as gutless as he is venal. Props also to Antonio Fargas as Foxy's ne'r-do-well brother, a get-over Negro who repays her for saving his life by dropping dime on her narc boyfriend, resulting in the rubout that kicks the second act of Foxy Brown into high gear.

Producer: Buzz Feitshans
Director: Jack Hill
Screenplay: Jack Hill
Cinematography: Brick Marquard
Film Editing: Chuck McClelland
Costume Design: Ruthie West
Music: Willie Hutch
Cast: Pam Grier (Foxy Brown), Antonio Fargas (Link Brown), Peter Brown (Steve Elias), Terry Carter (Dalton Ford/Mike Anderson), Kathryn Loder (Katherine Wall), Harry Holcombe (Judge Fenton), Sid Haig (Hays, pilot), Juanita Brown (Claudia), Sally Ann Stroud (Deb), Bob Minor (Oscar), Tony Giorgio (Eddie), Fred Lerner (Bunyon), Jon Cedar (Dr. Chase), H. B. Haggerty (Brandi), Boyd "Red" Morgan (Slauson), Esther Sutherland (Nurse Crockett), Jeannie Epper (Bobbi, lesbian bar bully), Jack Bernardi (Tedesco), Ed Knight (Adams), Edward Cross (Willard).
C-94m. Letterboxed.

by Richard Harland Smith
The Gist (Foxy Brown) - The Gist

The Gist (Foxy Brown) - THE GIST

Jack Hill never could get any damn respect. A talented musician and arranger who wound up directing films indirectly, after pursuing a career in scoring them, Hill is one of the least celebrated dogbodies of the Roger Corman kennel. Unlike the upwardly mobile Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda and (to a lesser extent) Monte Hellman, Hill rarely gets lauded as an auteur of any stripe, much less name-checked outside of discussions of the exploitation and blaxploitation films for which he is most widely associated. Histories of independent film in the Sixties and Seventies don't include the work of Jack Hill, which is more than an injustice-it's an outright crime! As one Internet critic so aptly put it, Hill's movies are worthwhile because they're always better than you think they're going to be. After doing piecework for Corman on such pictures as The Wasp Woman (1960), which he padded out with new scenes for TV, and Operation Titian (1963), an art forgery caper which he turned into an artist-goes-nuts psycho thriller (and which was shelved by Corman and recut as a vampire film!), Hill banged out the singularly oddball Spider Baby, or The Maddest Story Ever Told (shot in 1964, released only in 1968). Going a darker route on the weird family vogue of The Munsters and The Addams Family, Spider Baby offered a nuclear family on the cusp of meltdown that prefigured the cannibal clan of Tobe Hooper's The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) and its even money as to which clan is the more disturbing. Although his name is as inextricably linked with blaxploitation as Jim Brown or Fred Williamson, Hill made only two features in that particular subgenre, both starring the iconic Pam Grier. Coffy (1973) was a woman's revenge picture about a grieving nurse going ballistic on the drug pushers who turned her teenage sister into a junkie. Inexplicably profitable, Coffy beget an immediate sequel, which Hill titled Burn, Coffy, Burn (in the declarative vein of the Blacula [1972] follow-up Scream, Blacula, Scream, 1973) until the bean counters at AIP decided sequels weren't good box office. Given very little prep time, Hill turned the aborted sequel into the stand-alone feature Foxy Brown (1974), which hit the grindhouses a mere ten months after Coffy's premiere. Foxy Brown (yes, that's what it says on her California driver's license) offers more of the same, with Hill working hard at nothing so much as out-doing himself and the original film's trademark audience-pleasing set pieces of ultra-violence. As attested by Foxy Brown's opening titles (crafted without Hill's participation or consent), American International Pictures wanted a black female James Bond, although they offered up no additional funds to make it happen. Despite Coffy's wide profit margin, Hill was treated by the independent studio as the proverbial red-headed stepchild and given no bigger a budget (although both he and Pam Grier drew fatter paychecks). Consequently, Foxy Brown often looks cheap and down-at-heal, with the then-rundown Ambassador Hotel subbing for too many interiors and the film's only real flamboyance coming from the statuesque Grier, resplendent in her gull-wing collar Day-Glo blouses and rhinestone studded bib overalls. Throughout most of her career, Grier was more adept at being an icon than an actresses and her craft at times fails her here; asked to emote a combination of rage and grief, she merely seems pissed off, although she handles comic and action scenes deftly and is throughout a heroine worth whistling for. The sins perpetuated against Foxy (and by extension, Grier) still disturb today (as does Hill's politically incorrect dialogue) and there are few contemporary actresses who would put themselves through the gauntlet that Foxy endures on her rocky road to retribution. The dynamite Willie Hutch score elevates the material, particularly the pedestrian cinematography of Brick Marquard. Jack Hill's hand (and eye) are conspicuous throughout-- as when one character's doom is nicely telegraphed by his passing an expired parking meter while two thugs draw a bead on him from behind. Hill modulates his outrages well, saving the best for last, as Foxy crashes a drug deal in a stolen airplane, julienning one villain in the propeller blades while leaving his boss to be emasculated by a cadre of Black Panther surrogates. Kudos to TV actor Peter Brown for making this notorious bit of business so richly deserved. One of three stars of the short-lived TV western Laredo, the hunky Brown makes his medallion-wearing mini-Machiavelli a thoroughly hateful character, as gutless as he is venal. Props also to Antonio Fargas as Foxy's ne'r-do-well brother, a get-over Negro who repays her for saving his life by dropping dime on her narc boyfriend, resulting in the rubout that kicks the second act of Foxy Brown into high gear. Producer: Buzz Feitshans Director: Jack Hill Screenplay: Jack Hill Cinematography: Brick Marquard Film Editing: Chuck McClelland Costume Design: Ruthie West Music: Willie Hutch Cast: Pam Grier (Foxy Brown), Antonio Fargas (Link Brown), Peter Brown (Steve Elias), Terry Carter (Dalton Ford/Mike Anderson), Kathryn Loder (Katherine Wall), Harry Holcombe (Judge Fenton), Sid Haig (Hays, pilot), Juanita Brown (Claudia), Sally Ann Stroud (Deb), Bob Minor (Oscar), Tony Giorgio (Eddie), Fred Lerner (Bunyon), Jon Cedar (Dr. Chase), H. B. Haggerty (Brandi), Boyd "Red" Morgan (Slauson), Esther Sutherland (Nurse Crockett), Jeannie Epper (Bobbi, lesbian bar bully), Jack Bernardi (Tedesco), Ed Knight (Adams), Edward Cross (Willard). C-94m. Letterboxed. by Richard Harland Smith

Insider Info (Foxy Brown) - BEHIND THE SCENES


Foxy Brown was conceived as a sequel to the earlier and hugely profitable Coffy (1973), with the original title being Burn, Coffy, Burn. When the sales department of American International Pictures decreed that sequels didn't sell, the script became a stand-alone picture.

Jack Hill hated the title Foxy Brown.

Hill endured a combative relationship with American International Pictures and had no say in casting, set building or costuming and was never even invited by the studio to view the finished film.

Given eighteen days to shoot Foxy Brown, Jack Hill wrapped principle photography one day under schedule.

Hill had to fight with his producers to keep Foxy Brown's subplot about prostitute Claudia's estranged husband and young son.

Pam Grier's stunt double on Foxy Brown was Jadie David, who also stood in for the actress in Coffy, Sheba, Baby (1975), Friday Foster (1975) and Drum (1976) , as well as twenty years later in John Carpenter's Escape from L.A. (1996).

Antonio Fargas was cast in Foxy Brown on the strength of his appearance in Robert Downey's Putney Swope (1969).

Foxy Brown was produced for the same budget as Coffy-- "$500,000 and not a penny more." Because AIP had to pay director Jack Hill and star Pam Grier more than they had for Coffy, money was saved for Foxy Brown by casting stunt men in speaking parts.

After the success of Coffy, Pam Grier insisted on wardrobe approval for Foxy Brown...and got it.

Kathryn Loder had worked with Jack Hill before on the women-in-prison film The Big Doll House (1971) but was primarily a New York stage actress.

The bandages worn by Terry Carter in the film's hospital scene were applied by Jack Hill's future wife Elke, a German nurse.

Many interiors for Foxy Brown were filmed inside the rundown Ambassador Hotel.

Interiors of Miss Kathryn's home were shot in a rented house in Benedict Canyon.

Foxy Brown villain Peter Brown had been one of the three stars of the comic TV western Laredo (1965-67), alongside Neville Brand and William Smith.

Cast in Foxy Brown as a corrupt and lecherous judge, Harry Holcombe later appeared as a kindly old grandfather in TV spots for Countrytime lemonade.

Seen briefly in Foxy Brown is Russ Grieve, who would earn his own piece of cult movie immortality as parboiled paterfamilias "Big Bob" Carter of Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes (1977).

Foxy's method of obtaining a razor blade to cut her bonds was Pam Grier's idea. She later played a razor-toting prostitute in Fort Apache the Bronx (1981).

Although Foxy Brown was not the commercial hit that was Coffy, it has become the greater cult favorite.

Quentin Tarantino wrote Jackie Brown (1997) as a tribute to Foxy Brown, and named Pam Grier's title character after Jack Hill.

Sources:
Jack Hill audio commentary, Foxy Brown DVD, MGM Home Entertainment, C® 2001
"#1 Bad Ass: An Interview with Stuntman-Actor Bob Minor," by David Konow, Shock Cinema No. 28, May 2005.

Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Insider Info (Foxy Brown) - BEHIND THE SCENES

Foxy Brown was conceived as a sequel to the earlier and hugely profitable Coffy (1973), with the original title being Burn, Coffy, Burn. When the sales department of American International Pictures decreed that sequels didn't sell, the script became a stand-alone picture. Jack Hill hated the title Foxy Brown. Hill endured a combative relationship with American International Pictures and had no say in casting, set building or costuming and was never even invited by the studio to view the finished film. Given eighteen days to shoot Foxy Brown, Jack Hill wrapped principle photography one day under schedule. Hill had to fight with his producers to keep Foxy Brown's subplot about prostitute Claudia's estranged husband and young son. Pam Grier's stunt double on Foxy Brown was Jadie David, who also stood in for the actress in Coffy, Sheba, Baby (1975), Friday Foster (1975) and Drum (1976) , as well as twenty years later in John Carpenter's Escape from L.A. (1996). Antonio Fargas was cast in Foxy Brown on the strength of his appearance in Robert Downey's Putney Swope (1969). Foxy Brown was produced for the same budget as Coffy-- "$500,000 and not a penny more." Because AIP had to pay director Jack Hill and star Pam Grier more than they had for Coffy, money was saved for Foxy Brown by casting stunt men in speaking parts. After the success of Coffy, Pam Grier insisted on wardrobe approval for Foxy Brown...and got it. Kathryn Loder had worked with Jack Hill before on the women-in-prison film The Big Doll House (1971) but was primarily a New York stage actress. The bandages worn by Terry Carter in the film's hospital scene were applied by Jack Hill's future wife Elke, a German nurse. Many interiors for Foxy Brown were filmed inside the rundown Ambassador Hotel. Interiors of Miss Kathryn's home were shot in a rented house in Benedict Canyon. Foxy Brown villain Peter Brown had been one of the three stars of the comic TV western Laredo (1965-67), alongside Neville Brand and William Smith. Cast in Foxy Brown as a corrupt and lecherous judge, Harry Holcombe later appeared as a kindly old grandfather in TV spots for Countrytime lemonade. Seen briefly in Foxy Brown is Russ Grieve, who would earn his own piece of cult movie immortality as parboiled paterfamilias "Big Bob" Carter of Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes (1977). Foxy's method of obtaining a razor blade to cut her bonds was Pam Grier's idea. She later played a razor-toting prostitute in Fort Apache the Bronx (1981). Although Foxy Brown was not the commercial hit that was Coffy, it has become the greater cult favorite. Quentin Tarantino wrote Jackie Brown (1997) as a tribute to Foxy Brown, and named Pam Grier's title character after Jack Hill. Sources: Jack Hill audio commentary, Foxy Brown DVD, MGM Home Entertainment, C® 2001 "#1 Bad Ass: An Interview with Stuntman-Actor Bob Minor," by David Konow, Shock Cinema No. 28, May 2005. Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Yea or Nay (Foxy Brown) - CRITIC REVIEWS OF "FOXY BROWN"


"Made by the same writer/director and star as Coffy (1973), this film is just as rough and ready as the earlier one and even more explicit in its scenes of violence...The overall effect is a good deal less than gratifying."
The Aurum Film Encyclopedia: The Gangster Film

"It's pretty outrageous, with decapitation by plane propeller, castration, rape, drugs, bondage, gay and lesbian characters and lots of wigs. Actually, Grier is abused too much in this one and doesn't spend enough time kicking ass."
Michael J. Weldon, The Psychotronic Video Guide

"In both Coffy and Foxy Brown, Pam was given starring shots and was allowed to strut her stuff, both dramatically and physically...in Foxy Brown, her name might have changed, but her routine didn't. This time around it's her boyfriend that's been offed by the drug-pushing crime lords, and after bedding 'em and burning 'em, Pam takes vigilante-ism to new heights as when she castrates one of the dope kingpins and sends his organ back in a pickle jar."
Steve Puchalski, Slimetime

"Exiting scenes after stirring up trouble is something of a habit for Grier's character: in one scene, she leaves a high-profile judge in public with his pants down. Later, she busts up a drug deal with a borrowed airplane and speeds away to catch up to one of the dealers. In yet another scene, she runs away from a pair of kidnappers, one of them disfigured by her makeshift weapon, the other burned in a gas fire. Everyone who meets this woman is changed by the encounter."
Chris Holland & Scott Hamilton, Stomp Tokyo

"Grier's follow-up to Coffy, also scripted and directed by Hill, lacks all the fine, subversive qualities she lent that film. She continues the avenger role, but in much diluted form, simply exacting retribution for the murder of her narcotics officer boyfriend (gone is Coffy's environment of all-pervasive and over-weening corruption); and in any case this is subsumed in a general racial tone, with every white within spitting distance made a bigot, for the sole purpose of milking audience reactions in the most blatant way possible. Grier is an actress able to convey an amazing and unflinching strength, and she reveals the film for the dross it is."
TimeOut London

"Foxy Brown is...the kind of movie you love because of its flaws rather than despite them. The often horrendous dialogue, silly costumes, amateurish fighting, eccentric characterizations, and Pam Grier changing from one skimpy outfit to the next is what you'll see for the duration, and if that's all it takes to entertain you, the goods are definitely delivered here."
Vince Leo, Qwipster's Movie Reviews

"Foxy Brown is about as well rounded as an exploitation film could possibly be...It has the memorable characters, dialogue and the amazing charisma of a great cast. The story is simplistic, maybe even cut and paste, but the film makes it work. It's a simple us vs. them story, and the film sells it from the very beginning...Even when the film is violent, gritty and downright mean, it's still all part of one story and we know by the end the good guys are going to win."
Varied Celluloid

"Jack Hill was always a much better writer/director than most of his exploitation peers, and if his films were often formulaic they were never boring, and frequently laugh-out-loud funny. Foxy Brown has got some great lines...memorably dubious characters and plenty of suitably immoral behaviour. The evil drug runners are particularly amusing – in keeping with the film's Girl Power theme, they're led by the intensely unnerving Kathryn Loder, and are as idiotic a collection of goons as you're likely to find. Other male characters – a corrupt judge, lecherous drug trafficker, the loathsome Link – are deeply unimpressive examples of their gender and are quickly kicked into touch by the no-nonsense Foxy."
Daniel Auty, The Spinning Image

"There's grotesque Seventies fashions aplenty, a disgustingly kinky relationship between the nasty-looking mob boss and her gigolo boyfriend, big cars, big guns, big hair, and lots of wah-wah guitar soundtrack...Predictably, the story builds up to a torrent of violence and gunplay by the end (including death by airplane propeller). This is fun action sleaze from the classic era of drive-in blaxploitation films, driven by the no-nonsense direction of Jack Hill, and did well enough at the box office to help put the still-gorgeous Pam Grier on the map. Don't miss it."
Jerry Renshaw, The Austin Chronicle

"First of all, they just don't make movies like this anymore. Movies today are so sanitized and wiped free of genuine emotion that one doesn't have much of a reaction to them. This movie features RAW emotion, mainly rage and anger. It also doesn't play nice on the brutality. I could not believe Foxy was actually going to be raped... that would NEVER happen in a movie today, and if it did, it would never be treated as casually as it was here. The way she is brutalized in this movie is genuinely shocking, and the ways in which she gets her revenge are equally shocking... and exhilarating."
Cinema de Merde

"Sleazy blaxploitation film from the 70s that's built around big busted Pam Grier as Foxy Brown knocking you over with her brown sugar and spice. It's writer-director Jack Hill's follow-up to his commercially successful Coffy, which also featured Pam. Foxy lacks the fine subversive quality of the other film, instead it resorts to being an uninteresting revenge film with plenty of violence and cheap thrills aimed at satisfying its mostly black audience...Pam proves to be up for the role's physicality, looks hot in every tacky outfit she adorns, handles a gun like a pro, curses with the best of 'em, can drive a Cadillac Sedan de Ville as if it were a lethal weapon and still shines as a desirable sex symbol. This one is strictly for the blaxploitation crowd and fans of Pam."
Dennis Schwartz, Ozus' Movie Reviews

"Brutal, tasteless, nasty, and completely enjoyable. Pam looks great as always and gets to pull guns out of her afro. It's another prime example of the extremes you could explore in the 1970s that would never be permitted in a million years these days...And it goes without saying that the Willie Hutch soundtrack is superb. The theme song kicks almost as much ass as Pam, and the rest is suitably funky and cool. You only wish your life had this theme music."
Keith Allison, Teleport City

"When 'the party's over,' as Brown later announces, we are witnessing hero iconography reminiscent of Bruce Lee. Amid the pantsuits and head wraps, Grier shines in this sometimes-meandering production. She delivers a performance full of conviction and candor. Whether tore up or glammed up, Grier as Brown becomes the ultimate female hero. Rage never looked so good."
Charles Conn, The Austin Chronicle

Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Yea or Nay (Foxy Brown) - CRITIC REVIEWS OF "FOXY BROWN"

"Made by the same writer/director and star as Coffy (1973), this film is just as rough and ready as the earlier one and even more explicit in its scenes of violence...The overall effect is a good deal less than gratifying." The Aurum Film Encyclopedia: The Gangster Film "It's pretty outrageous, with decapitation by plane propeller, castration, rape, drugs, bondage, gay and lesbian characters and lots of wigs. Actually, Grier is abused too much in this one and doesn't spend enough time kicking ass." Michael J. Weldon, The Psychotronic Video Guide "In both Coffy and Foxy Brown, Pam was given starring shots and was allowed to strut her stuff, both dramatically and physically...in Foxy Brown, her name might have changed, but her routine didn't. This time around it's her boyfriend that's been offed by the drug-pushing crime lords, and after bedding 'em and burning 'em, Pam takes vigilante-ism to new heights as when she castrates one of the dope kingpins and sends his organ back in a pickle jar." Steve Puchalski, Slimetime "Exiting scenes after stirring up trouble is something of a habit for Grier's character: in one scene, she leaves a high-profile judge in public with his pants down. Later, she busts up a drug deal with a borrowed airplane and speeds away to catch up to one of the dealers. In yet another scene, she runs away from a pair of kidnappers, one of them disfigured by her makeshift weapon, the other burned in a gas fire. Everyone who meets this woman is changed by the encounter." Chris Holland & Scott Hamilton, Stomp Tokyo "Grier's follow-up to Coffy, also scripted and directed by Hill, lacks all the fine, subversive qualities she lent that film. She continues the avenger role, but in much diluted form, simply exacting retribution for the murder of her narcotics officer boyfriend (gone is Coffy's environment of all-pervasive and over-weening corruption); and in any case this is subsumed in a general racial tone, with every white within spitting distance made a bigot, for the sole purpose of milking audience reactions in the most blatant way possible. Grier is an actress able to convey an amazing and unflinching strength, and she reveals the film for the dross it is." TimeOut London "Foxy Brown is...the kind of movie you love because of its flaws rather than despite them. The often horrendous dialogue, silly costumes, amateurish fighting, eccentric characterizations, and Pam Grier changing from one skimpy outfit to the next is what you'll see for the duration, and if that's all it takes to entertain you, the goods are definitely delivered here." Vince Leo, Qwipster's Movie Reviews "Foxy Brown is about as well rounded as an exploitation film could possibly be...It has the memorable characters, dialogue and the amazing charisma of a great cast. The story is simplistic, maybe even cut and paste, but the film makes it work. It's a simple us vs. them story, and the film sells it from the very beginning...Even when the film is violent, gritty and downright mean, it's still all part of one story and we know by the end the good guys are going to win." Varied Celluloid "Jack Hill was always a much better writer/director than most of his exploitation peers, and if his films were often formulaic they were never boring, and frequently laugh-out-loud funny. Foxy Brown has got some great lines...memorably dubious characters and plenty of suitably immoral behaviour. The evil drug runners are particularly amusing – in keeping with the film's Girl Power theme, they're led by the intensely unnerving Kathryn Loder, and are as idiotic a collection of goons as you're likely to find. Other male characters – a corrupt judge, lecherous drug trafficker, the loathsome Link – are deeply unimpressive examples of their gender and are quickly kicked into touch by the no-nonsense Foxy." Daniel Auty, The Spinning Image "There's grotesque Seventies fashions aplenty, a disgustingly kinky relationship between the nasty-looking mob boss and her gigolo boyfriend, big cars, big guns, big hair, and lots of wah-wah guitar soundtrack...Predictably, the story builds up to a torrent of violence and gunplay by the end (including death by airplane propeller). This is fun action sleaze from the classic era of drive-in blaxploitation films, driven by the no-nonsense direction of Jack Hill, and did well enough at the box office to help put the still-gorgeous Pam Grier on the map. Don't miss it." Jerry Renshaw, The Austin Chronicle "First of all, they just don't make movies like this anymore. Movies today are so sanitized and wiped free of genuine emotion that one doesn't have much of a reaction to them. This movie features RAW emotion, mainly rage and anger. It also doesn't play nice on the brutality. I could not believe Foxy was actually going to be raped... that would NEVER happen in a movie today, and if it did, it would never be treated as casually as it was here. The way she is brutalized in this movie is genuinely shocking, and the ways in which she gets her revenge are equally shocking... and exhilarating." Cinema de Merde "Sleazy blaxploitation film from the 70s that's built around big busted Pam Grier as Foxy Brown knocking you over with her brown sugar and spice. It's writer-director Jack Hill's follow-up to his commercially successful Coffy, which also featured Pam. Foxy lacks the fine subversive quality of the other film, instead it resorts to being an uninteresting revenge film with plenty of violence and cheap thrills aimed at satisfying its mostly black audience...Pam proves to be up for the role's physicality, looks hot in every tacky outfit she adorns, handles a gun like a pro, curses with the best of 'em, can drive a Cadillac Sedan de Ville as if it were a lethal weapon and still shines as a desirable sex symbol. This one is strictly for the blaxploitation crowd and fans of Pam." Dennis Schwartz, Ozus' Movie Reviews "Brutal, tasteless, nasty, and completely enjoyable. Pam looks great as always and gets to pull guns out of her afro. It's another prime example of the extremes you could explore in the 1970s that would never be permitted in a million years these days...And it goes without saying that the Willie Hutch soundtrack is superb. The theme song kicks almost as much ass as Pam, and the rest is suitably funky and cool. You only wish your life had this theme music." Keith Allison, Teleport City "When 'the party's over,' as Brown later announces, we are witnessing hero iconography reminiscent of Bruce Lee. Amid the pantsuits and head wraps, Grier shines in this sometimes-meandering production. She delivers a performance full of conviction and candor. Whether tore up or glammed up, Grier as Brown becomes the ultimate female hero. Rage never looked so good." Charles Conn, The Austin Chronicle Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

In The Know (Foxy Brown) - TRIVIA


Foxy Brown writer-director Jack Hill was the son of a set designer for Warner Brothers and The Walt Disney Studio. Hill's father designed Sleeping Beauty's Castle at Disneyland.

As a young musician, Hill earned rent money playing gypsy music at a Hungarian restaurant on the Sunset Strip.

Hill was a classmate of Francis Ford Coppola at UCLA and followed Coppola into work for Roger Corman.

Hill's first screen credit was as a production assistant on Battle Beyond the Sun (1963), a Russian science fiction film retooled for US audiences by American International Pictures using footage shot by Coppola.

Hill worked with Boris Karloff in the aging horror icon's last four films: The Snake People (1971), Chamber of Fear (1972), House of Evil (1968) and Sinister Invasion (1971). The Mexican-financed features made use of Karloff in scenes shot by Hill in Hollywood on sets built by his father. Although Hill was contracted to travel to Mexico to finish these projects, producer Luis Enrique Vergara assigned their completion to various (and cheaper) Mexican directors but never lived to see them completed.

Born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1949, Pamela Suzette Grier is a cousin of football player-turned-actor Rosey Grier.

Like her character in Coffy, Pam Grier's mother, Gwendolyn Samuels, was a registered nurse.

When she was 18, Grier was the first runner-up in the Miss Colorado Universe Contest.

In 1967, Grier relocated from Denver to Los Angeles, where she worked initially as a receptionist in the Hollywood office of American International Pictures.

While a student at UCLA, Grier was a backup singer for Bobby Womack, whose soulful theme for Across 110th Street (1972) would be sampled by director Quentin Tarantino for Grier's comeback vehicle Jackie Brown (1997).

Grier's first starring roles were in movies shot in the Philippines. While on location there, she contracted an almost fatal tropical disease, lost her hair, and went temporarily blind.

Grier was the first African American woman to appear on the cover of Ms. magazine.

Diagnosed with cancer in 1988, Grier was given 18 months to live. She survived, but lost her sister to the disease in 1990.

Of Argentine descent, Terry Carter was born John DeCoste in Brooklyn, New York, in 1928. The name "Terry" came from his love of the popular comic strip "Terry and the Pirates."

As a youth, Carter was in the same Boy Scouts of America troupe as future jazz pianist Cecil Taylor.

In 1965, Carter became the first black TV news anchor, at Boston's WBZ-TV.

While filming Foxy Brown, Carter was a regular member of the cast of the TV detective series McCloud, which ran from 1970 to 1977.

Like his Foxy Brown costars Pam Grier and Terry Carter, Antonio Fargas is of mixed race: Puerto Rican on his father's side and West Indian on his mother's side.

Born in the Bronx and raised in Chelsea, Fargas is one of eleven children.

Fargas' professional acting career began at the age of 14, with a small role in the film The Cool World (1964), which was shot on location in Harlem.

Fargas missed his high school graduation because he was touring Austria in a traveling production of James Baldwin's The Amen Corner.

Fargas' trademark characterization of a street-smart hustler began with a bit in Gordon Parks' Shaft (1971).

After playing a small role in Across 110th Street, Fargas was requested by director Barry Shear to play "Huggy Bear" in the pilot film for the TV series Starsky and Hutch.

Fargas spoofed his streetwise image in Keenan Ivory Wayans' I'm Gonna Git You Sucka (1989), as former "Pimp of the Year" Flyguy.

Cast in the bit role as Antonio Fargas' girlfriend was Sally Ann Stroud, then-wife of character player Don Stroud.

Actor Sid Haig was born Sidney Eddie Mosesian in Fresno, California, in 1939. Haig was his father's given name.

An uncoordinated child, Haig was given dance lessons in hopes of giving him poise.

Haig's first stage role was as The Scarecrow in a school production of The Wizard of Oz.

Like Dustin Hoffman and Gene Hackman, Haig studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse.

Haig first worked for Jack Hill in the director's UCLA student film, The Host (1960).

In Jackie Brown, Haig appeared as a judge.

In 1973, Bob Minor was the first African-American to join the Stuntman's Association of Motion Pictures. Six years later, he was the association's second vice president.

Minor missed out on appearing with Pam Grier in Jackie Brown when he was seriously injured while performing a stunt in John Landis' Blues Brothers 2000 (1998).

Cast in Foxy Brown as a lesbian bar bully who goes mano a mano with Pam Grier, stunt woman Jeannie Epper later doubled for Lynda Carter on the Wonder Woman TV series. She recently performed stunt work and acted in Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, Vol. 2 (2004).

Sources:
Jack Hill audio commentary, Foxy Brown DVD, MGM Home Entertainment, c® 2001
"#1 Bad Ass: An Interview with Stuntman-Actor Bob Minor," by David Konow, Shock Cinema No. 28, May 2005.
Terry Carter Official Website, www.terrycarter.com
"A Psychotronic Interview with Sid Haig," Psychotronic Video No. 3, 1989.
"Jack Hill: Exploitation Genius," interview by Sean Axmaker, Psychotronic Video No. 13, 1992
"Antonio Juan Fargas: How Huggy Bear Made it to Hollywood Squares," by Anthony Petkovich, Derek Johnson and Chris Davidson, Psychotronic Video No. 15, 1993.
The Official Home of Sid Haig, www.sidhaig.com
Interview: Sid Haig, by John Marcotte, www.badmouth.net, 2004.
The Internet Movie Database

Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

In The Know (Foxy Brown) - TRIVIA

Foxy Brown writer-director Jack Hill was the son of a set designer for Warner Brothers and The Walt Disney Studio. Hill's father designed Sleeping Beauty's Castle at Disneyland. As a young musician, Hill earned rent money playing gypsy music at a Hungarian restaurant on the Sunset Strip. Hill was a classmate of Francis Ford Coppola at UCLA and followed Coppola into work for Roger Corman. Hill's first screen credit was as a production assistant on Battle Beyond the Sun (1963), a Russian science fiction film retooled for US audiences by American International Pictures using footage shot by Coppola. Hill worked with Boris Karloff in the aging horror icon's last four films: The Snake People (1971), Chamber of Fear (1972), House of Evil (1968) and Sinister Invasion (1971). The Mexican-financed features made use of Karloff in scenes shot by Hill in Hollywood on sets built by his father. Although Hill was contracted to travel to Mexico to finish these projects, producer Luis Enrique Vergara assigned their completion to various (and cheaper) Mexican directors but never lived to see them completed. Born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1949, Pamela Suzette Grier is a cousin of football player-turned-actor Rosey Grier. Like her character in Coffy, Pam Grier's mother, Gwendolyn Samuels, was a registered nurse. When she was 18, Grier was the first runner-up in the Miss Colorado Universe Contest. In 1967, Grier relocated from Denver to Los Angeles, where she worked initially as a receptionist in the Hollywood office of American International Pictures. While a student at UCLA, Grier was a backup singer for Bobby Womack, whose soulful theme for Across 110th Street (1972) would be sampled by director Quentin Tarantino for Grier's comeback vehicle Jackie Brown (1997). Grier's first starring roles were in movies shot in the Philippines. While on location there, she contracted an almost fatal tropical disease, lost her hair, and went temporarily blind. Grier was the first African American woman to appear on the cover of Ms. magazine. Diagnosed with cancer in 1988, Grier was given 18 months to live. She survived, but lost her sister to the disease in 1990. Of Argentine descent, Terry Carter was born John DeCoste in Brooklyn, New York, in 1928. The name "Terry" came from his love of the popular comic strip "Terry and the Pirates." As a youth, Carter was in the same Boy Scouts of America troupe as future jazz pianist Cecil Taylor. In 1965, Carter became the first black TV news anchor, at Boston's WBZ-TV. While filming Foxy Brown, Carter was a regular member of the cast of the TV detective series McCloud, which ran from 1970 to 1977. Like his Foxy Brown costars Pam Grier and Terry Carter, Antonio Fargas is of mixed race: Puerto Rican on his father's side and West Indian on his mother's side. Born in the Bronx and raised in Chelsea, Fargas is one of eleven children. Fargas' professional acting career began at the age of 14, with a small role in the film The Cool World (1964), which was shot on location in Harlem. Fargas missed his high school graduation because he was touring Austria in a traveling production of James Baldwin's The Amen Corner. Fargas' trademark characterization of a street-smart hustler began with a bit in Gordon Parks' Shaft (1971). After playing a small role in Across 110th Street, Fargas was requested by director Barry Shear to play "Huggy Bear" in the pilot film for the TV series Starsky and Hutch. Fargas spoofed his streetwise image in Keenan Ivory Wayans' I'm Gonna Git You Sucka (1989), as former "Pimp of the Year" Flyguy. Cast in the bit role as Antonio Fargas' girlfriend was Sally Ann Stroud, then-wife of character player Don Stroud. Actor Sid Haig was born Sidney Eddie Mosesian in Fresno, California, in 1939. Haig was his father's given name. An uncoordinated child, Haig was given dance lessons in hopes of giving him poise. Haig's first stage role was as The Scarecrow in a school production of The Wizard of Oz. Like Dustin Hoffman and Gene Hackman, Haig studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse. Haig first worked for Jack Hill in the director's UCLA student film, The Host (1960). In Jackie Brown, Haig appeared as a judge. In 1973, Bob Minor was the first African-American to join the Stuntman's Association of Motion Pictures. Six years later, he was the association's second vice president. Minor missed out on appearing with Pam Grier in Jackie Brown when he was seriously injured while performing a stunt in John Landis' Blues Brothers 2000 (1998). Cast in Foxy Brown as a lesbian bar bully who goes mano a mano with Pam Grier, stunt woman Jeannie Epper later doubled for Lynda Carter on the Wonder Woman TV series. She recently performed stunt work and acted in Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill, Vol. 2 (2004). Sources: Jack Hill audio commentary, Foxy Brown DVD, MGM Home Entertainment, c® 2001 "#1 Bad Ass: An Interview with Stuntman-Actor Bob Minor," by David Konow, Shock Cinema No. 28, May 2005. Terry Carter Official Website, www.terrycarter.com "A Psychotronic Interview with Sid Haig," Psychotronic Video No. 3, 1989. "Jack Hill: Exploitation Genius," interview by Sean Axmaker, Psychotronic Video No. 13, 1992 "Antonio Juan Fargas: How Huggy Bear Made it to Hollywood Squares," by Anthony Petkovich, Derek Johnson and Chris Davidson, Psychotronic Video No. 15, 1993. The Official Home of Sid Haig, www.sidhaig.com Interview: Sid Haig, by John Marcotte, www.badmouth.net, 2004. The Internet Movie Database Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Quote It (Foxy Brown) - QUOTES FROM "FOXY BROWN"


Link (Antonio Fargas): Look, there's two big motherf*ckers waiting to beat the living sh*t out of me as soon as these two cops finish they g*ddamn lunch."

Link: "Say, you know where I could find an all-night men's room?"

Link: "Jesus, you saved my beautiful black ass, you really did."

Link: "Foxy, look baby...I'm a black man and I don't know how to sing and I don't know how to dance and I don't know how to preach to no congregation. I'm too small to be a football hero and I'm too ugly to be elected mayor."

Link: "Baby, jail is where some of the first people I know are these days."

Mike (Terry Carter): "A little taste of honey ain't enough for me. I gotta have the whole beehive."

Nurse Campbell (Esther Sutherland): "Clean a body, clean a mind. Then a body Jesus will find."

Oscar (Bob Minor): You a friend of Foxy's, you're all right, brother."

Mike: "Maybe he's got the right idea."
Foxy (Pam Grier): "Sho' do."
Mike: "But I don't know...vigilante justice?"
Foxy: "It's as American as apple pie."

Foxy: "He always has his feelers out. Like a cockroach."

Bunyan (Fred Lerner): "I zapped him between the blades. He fell, just like in the movies."
Steve (Peter Brown): "Just like in the movies? And then he probably got up again-just like in the movies."

Foxy: "Now I only got so much self control and I'm happy to put one of those right between your eyes no matter what Mama'd say."

Foxy: "You're movin' out, brother-out of town. And I mean it, Link. You think you're back in with those people but they got a stick of dynamite up your ass and the fuse is burning, you understand? Now, I want you out. O-U-T."

Deb (Sally Ann Stroud): "Who does she think she is?"
Link: "Whoa, that's my sister, baby. And she's a whole lot of woman."

Foxy: "You tell me who you want done and I'll do the hell out of him-if the price is right."

Katherine (Kathryn Loder): "The material should cling to the breast so the nipples show through. Arabella...I want that fat toad drooling in his pants. Whenever he looks at you, think sex. If you find him repulsive, think of someone else who turns you on."

Claudia (Juanita Brown): "True love hits the strangest people, I guess."

Foxy: "Why don't we go and, uh, adjudicate this matter in chambers, as they say, and maybe we can make a few motions or something."

Foxy: "The charge, your Honor, is assault with a very un-deadly weapon."

Foxy: "I've heard of a meat shortage, but that's ridiculous."

Foxy: "You pink-assed corrupt honky judge, take your little wet noodle out of here and if you see a man anywhere send him to me, because I do need a man."

Bobbie (Jeannie Epper): "Listen skinny, before you start talking tough, I'd better warn you I've got a black belt in karate. So why don't you get out of here quietly, while you still got some teeth left in that ugly face?" Foxy: "And I got my black belt...in barstools."

Foxy: "The game ain't over yet, bitch."

Saloon: "This is gasoline--"
Foxy: "You know it, motherf*cker."

Hays (Sid Haig): "Bartender, get this dusky young lady whatever it is she needs to quench her magnificent thirst."

Committee Leader: "All right, uh, we've talked about your request and, uh, we're not sure whether we want to help you or not. We're a neighborhood committee and, uh, this is sort of out of our neighborhood, you know what I mean?"
Oscar: "Maybe the time has come to grow a bit, brother"
Committee Leader: "What is it you really want?"
Foxy: "Justice."
Committee Leader: "For whom, your brother?"
Foxy: "Why not? It could be your brother, too. Or your sister. Or your children. I want justice for all of them. And I want justice for all the other people whose lives are bought and sold so that a few big shots can climb up on their backs and laugh at the law. And laugh at human decency. And most of all, I want justice for a good man. This man had love in his heart. And he died because he went out of his neighborhood to try to do what he thought was right."
Committee Leader: "Sister, I think want you're asking for is revenge."
Foxy: "You just take care of the justice and I'll handle the revenge myself."

Katherine: "I really do love you in this shirt."

Eddie (Tony Giorgio): "You're gonna be a spook for real pretty soon."

Foxy: "Don't pinch the fruit, faggot."

Katherine: "What is it, Eddie?"
Eddie: "I don't know. Looks like a pickle jar or something."

Foxy: "The rest of your boyfriend is still around and I hope you two live a long time. And then maybe you'll get to feel what I feel. Death is too easy for you, bitch. I want you to suffer."

Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Quote It (Foxy Brown) - QUOTES FROM "FOXY BROWN"

Link (Antonio Fargas): Look, there's two big motherf*ckers waiting to beat the living sh*t out of me as soon as these two cops finish they g*ddamn lunch." Link: "Say, you know where I could find an all-night men's room?" Link: "Jesus, you saved my beautiful black ass, you really did." Link: "Foxy, look baby...I'm a black man and I don't know how to sing and I don't know how to dance and I don't know how to preach to no congregation. I'm too small to be a football hero and I'm too ugly to be elected mayor." Link: "Baby, jail is where some of the first people I know are these days." Mike (Terry Carter): "A little taste of honey ain't enough for me. I gotta have the whole beehive." Nurse Campbell (Esther Sutherland): "Clean a body, clean a mind. Then a body Jesus will find." Oscar (Bob Minor): You a friend of Foxy's, you're all right, brother." Mike: "Maybe he's got the right idea." Foxy (Pam Grier): "Sho' do." Mike: "But I don't know...vigilante justice?" Foxy: "It's as American as apple pie." Foxy: "He always has his feelers out. Like a cockroach." Bunyan (Fred Lerner): "I zapped him between the blades. He fell, just like in the movies." Steve (Peter Brown): "Just like in the movies? And then he probably got up again-just like in the movies." Foxy: "Now I only got so much self control and I'm happy to put one of those right between your eyes no matter what Mama'd say." Foxy: "You're movin' out, brother-out of town. And I mean it, Link. You think you're back in with those people but they got a stick of dynamite up your ass and the fuse is burning, you understand? Now, I want you out. O-U-T." Deb (Sally Ann Stroud): "Who does she think she is?" Link: "Whoa, that's my sister, baby. And she's a whole lot of woman." Foxy: "You tell me who you want done and I'll do the hell out of him-if the price is right." Katherine (Kathryn Loder): "The material should cling to the breast so the nipples show through. Arabella...I want that fat toad drooling in his pants. Whenever he looks at you, think sex. If you find him repulsive, think of someone else who turns you on." Claudia (Juanita Brown): "True love hits the strangest people, I guess." Foxy: "Why don't we go and, uh, adjudicate this matter in chambers, as they say, and maybe we can make a few motions or something." Foxy: "The charge, your Honor, is assault with a very un-deadly weapon." Foxy: "I've heard of a meat shortage, but that's ridiculous." Foxy: "You pink-assed corrupt honky judge, take your little wet noodle out of here and if you see a man anywhere send him to me, because I do need a man." Bobbie (Jeannie Epper): "Listen skinny, before you start talking tough, I'd better warn you I've got a black belt in karate. So why don't you get out of here quietly, while you still got some teeth left in that ugly face?" Foxy: "And I got my black belt...in barstools." Foxy: "The game ain't over yet, bitch." Saloon: "This is gasoline--" Foxy: "You know it, motherf*cker." Hays (Sid Haig): "Bartender, get this dusky young lady whatever it is she needs to quench her magnificent thirst." Committee Leader: "All right, uh, we've talked about your request and, uh, we're not sure whether we want to help you or not. We're a neighborhood committee and, uh, this is sort of out of our neighborhood, you know what I mean?" Oscar: "Maybe the time has come to grow a bit, brother" Committee Leader: "What is it you really want?" Foxy: "Justice." Committee Leader: "For whom, your brother?" Foxy: "Why not? It could be your brother, too. Or your sister. Or your children. I want justice for all of them. And I want justice for all the other people whose lives are bought and sold so that a few big shots can climb up on their backs and laugh at the law. And laugh at human decency. And most of all, I want justice for a good man. This man had love in his heart. And he died because he went out of his neighborhood to try to do what he thought was right." Committee Leader: "Sister, I think want you're asking for is revenge." Foxy: "You just take care of the justice and I'll handle the revenge myself." Katherine: "I really do love you in this shirt." Eddie (Tony Giorgio): "You're gonna be a spook for real pretty soon." Foxy: "Don't pinch the fruit, faggot." Katherine: "What is it, Eddie?" Eddie: "I don't know. Looks like a pickle jar or something." Foxy: "The rest of your boyfriend is still around and I hope you two live a long time. And then maybe you'll get to feel what I feel. Death is too easy for you, bitch. I want you to suffer." Compiled by Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Don't mess with me! I've got a black belt in crime!
- Broad
I've got a black belt in barstools!
- Foxy Brown

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1996

Released in United States October 1998

Released in United States on Video August 25, 1988

Re-released in United States June 23, 1995

Shown at Chicago International Film Festival October 8-18,. 1998.

Re-released in United States June 23, 1995 (New York City)

Released in United States July 1996 (Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Thrills and chills with Jack Hill" July 13 - 14, 1996.)

Released in United States on Video August 25, 1988

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Chicago International Film Festival October 8-18,. 1998.)