Folies Bergère de Paris


1h 23m 1935
Folies Bergère de Paris

Brief Synopsis

An entertainer impersonates a look-alike banker, causing comic confusion for his girlfriend and his double's wife.

Film Details

Also Known As
Folies Bergère, L'homme des Folies Bergère, The Man from Folies Bergère
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 22, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
20th Century Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Red Cat by Rudolph Lothar and Hans Adler (New York, 19 Sep 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,338ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

After Eugene Charlier, star of the Folies Bergère in Paris, impersonates in his act the flirtatious Baron Cassini, the real baron, Fernand, goes backstage to congratulate Charlier and meets Charlier's lover Mimi, whom he tries to seduce. Meanwhile, Genevieve, the baroness, who is disillusioned with the baron's cheating and their passionless marriage, calls Charlier to her table, but she is taken aback when he flirts with her. When Henri Baneffe and Gustave Chatillard, the officials at the baron's bank, learn that the baron has gone to London to avoid bankruptcy by trying to get a loan to repay the twenty million francs he lost on the Nero mine in Mozambique, they hire Charlier to impersonate the baron during a reception for the premier of France. Genevieve plays along with the deception, although Charlier does not know that she knows he is not Fernand, and as a jest, she encourages his romantic inclinations. When Monsieur Paulet, the finance minister, asks to buy the baron's shares of stock in the Nero mine, Charlier unwittingly gets the price up to twenty-five million francs. Meanwhile, Mimi, angry at Charlier's absence, goes to visit the baron, whereupon Charlier, as the baron, kisses her to test her fidelity. She backs away until she recognizes the scratch marks she gave Charlier earlier, and then, to make him jealous, asks him to make violent love to her. Charlier slaps her, they argue and he leaves. The real baron returns and, having learned that Genevieve earlier had flirted with Charlier, tries to seduce her. Realizing the ruse, Genevieve kisses the baron passionately and leaves him thinking that she has betrayed him, but the next day, the baron, now aware of his wife's game, convinces her that he just arrived in town that morning. Ill with despair because she thinks that she earlier kissed Charlier, Genevieve learns the truth when he comes for a letter of recommendation. Although she tries to confuse the baron further, he kisses her passionately to prove that the earlier kiss was his. Later, he and the baroness watch Charlier, who has reconciled with Mimi, perform again in the Folies Bergère.

Cast

Maurice Chevalier

Fernand, the Baron Cassini/Eugene Charlier

Merle Oberon

Genevieve, the Baroness Cassini

Ann Sothern

Mimi

Eric Blore

François

Ferdinand Munier

Morrisot

Walter Byron

Rene, the Marquis de Lac

Lumsden Hare

Gustave [Chatillard]

Robert Greig

Henri [Baneffe]

Ferdinand Gottschalk

Perishot

Halliwell Hobbes

Monsieur Paulet

Georges Renavent

Premier of France

Phillip Dare

Victor

Frank Mcglynn Sr.

Joseph

Barbara Leonard

Toinette

Olin Howland

Stage manager

Albert Pollet

Male secretary

Marcelle Corday

Josephine

Sailor Vincent

Rubber

Robert Graves

Doorman

Paul Kruger

Second doorman

Irene Bentley

Second usherette

June Gale

Showgirl

Joseph E. Bernard

Butler

Perry Ivins

Airport official

Mario Dominici

Doctor

Ed Reinach

Bearded man

Pop Garson

Bearded man

Charles Hagen

Bearded man

Harry Milton

Bearded man

Austin Browne

Bearded man

Joe Mack

Bearded man

Bruce Covington

Bearded man

Adolph Faylauer

Bearded man

Conrad Seidermann

Bearded man

Marbeth Wright

Girl in bar

Jeanne Hart

Girl in bar

Bernadene Hayes

Girl in bar

Fay Worth

Girl in bar

Lucille Lund

Girl in bar

Joan Woodbury

Girl in bar

Marie Wells

Girl in bar

Maryan Dowling

Girl in bar

Vivian Martin

Usherette

Doris Morton

Usherette

Jenny Gray

Usherette

Olga Borget

Usherette

Pauline Rosebrook

Model

Shirley Hughes

Model

Dixie Mckinley

Model

Zandra Dvorak

Model

Libby Marks

Model

Rosa Milano

Model

Roy Seagus

Bartender

Harry Semels

Bartender

Alex Chevron

Bartender

Rene Mimieux

Bartender

Henri Runique

Bartender

Eugene Beday

Bartender

Hans Schumm

Bartender

Luis Hanore

Bartender

Dick Allen

Bartender

Bob Von Dobeneck

Waiter

William O'brien

Waiter

Jack Raymond

Waiter

Al Mazzola

Waiter

Al Constance

Waiter

Boris Fedotoff

Waiter

Paul Toien

Page boy

Lew Hicks

Baron's attendant

Leon Beaumont

Baron's attendant

Nam Dibot

Ticket man

Harry Holman

Waiter in cafe

Leonard Walker

Assistant stage manager

Mike Seibert

Electrician

Max Barwyn

Waiter in box

Helen Mann

Girl in secretary number

Jill Evans

Girl in secretary number

Angela Blue

Girl in secretary number

Joan Sheldon

Girl in secretary number

Barbara Roberts

Girl in secretary number

Nell Rhoades

Girl in secretary number

Mae Madison

Girl in secretary number

Audrey Hall

Girl in shell

Rita Dunn

Girl in shell

Myra Jones

Girl in shell

Mary Jane Hodge

Girl in shell

Pokey Champion

Girl in shell

Claudia Fargo

Girl in shell

Billie Lee

Girl in shell

Wedgwood Nowell

Man in montage

Barlowe Borland

Man in montage

Anders Van Haden

Man in montage

John Ince

Man in montage

Wilson Millar

Man in montage

Yorke Sherwood

Man in montage

Cyril Thornton

Man in montage

Vesey O'davoren

Man in montage

Robert Cody

Man in montage

Jenny Gray

Girl in hat store

Thaya Foster

Girl in hat store

Ruth Day

Girl in hat store

Barbara Beall

Girl in hat store

Gale Goodson

Girl in hat store

Virginia Dabney

Girl in hat store

Charlotte Brent

Ann Johnson

Nancy Page

Arna Finston

Doris Toddings

Peggy Brandon

Ruth Cedar

Bobby Joyce

Dolly Newmire

Lillian Porter

Doris Carlyle

Mary Adair

Lynne Kelly

Alice Dean

Rosemary Grimes

Vera Champion

Barbara Ferris

Patsy Daly

Elinore Gates

Bobby Sheehan

Ann Delikat

Marguerite Caverley

Margaret Davis

Pauline Milan

Edna Waldron

Geneva Hall

Hazel Fitzgerald

Galia Grandall

Lucille La Marr

Pat Hanna

June Rohlfs

Lillian Ross

Lucille Day

Alice Stombs

Sue Curtis

Earlene Heath

Crystal Keate

Lois Bailey

Mildred Reagan

Patsy Murray

Dee Barnes

Kay Barnes

Bunny Bronson

Helen Mcallister

Muriel Paull

Patsy Perrin

Betty Gordon

Mary Jane Carey

Midgie Dare

Ruth Riley

Muriel Scheck

Helen Seamon

Marion Shelton

Marie Koile

Helen Splane

Film Details

Also Known As
Folies Bergère, L'homme des Folies Bergère, The Man from Folies Bergère
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 22, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
20th Century Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Red Cat by Rudolph Lothar and Hans Adler (New York, 19 Sep 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,338ft (9 reels)

Award Wins

Best Dance Direction

1936

Articles

Folies Bergere de Paris


In Hollywood of the early 1930s, no one epitomized the romantic charm of France and continental sophistication of Paris better than Maurice Chevalier. The popular singer and nightclub entertainer had made his American film debut in the early sound era, where his boulevardier persona and lilting accent helped make him a major star in Ernst Lubitsch's witty musical comedies.

But Chevalier was getting tired of playing what he called "the same old fellow," the seductive Frenchman sweeping women off their feet and into bed with a smile and wink, and he was battling Irving Thalberg over his MGM assignments when Fox producer Darryl F. Zanuck offered him the lead in Folies Bergère de Paris (1935), a musical comedy that moves from the Paris stage to the world of high society and high finance and back. Zanuck had negotiated the film rights for the legendary Paris show palace and developed the film (based on the play The Red Cat) for Charles Boyer. When Boyer declined, Chevalier took the part.

The film offered Chevalier the opportunity to play two different roles: Folies Bergère headliner Eugene Charlier, a singer famed for his impersonation of Parisian millionaire Baron Fernand Cassini, and the banker and notorious womanizer Cassini himself. British beauty Merle Oberon (in one of her earliest American films) co-stars as Cassini's wife in "the perfect modern marriage" (they each go their own way) and Ann Sothern is Charlier's pathologically jealous girlfriend. The two men flirt with one another's partners, of course, but the play of mistaken and swapped identities gets comically complicated as identities are swapped back and forth and the women use the confusion to play their own games.

The choreography by Dave Gould is right out of the Busby Berkeley playbook, with sets that expand back from the proscenium arch of the physical stage into impossibly epic spaces, dancers that multiply into small armies, overhead cameras that look down on a chorus forming elaborate geometric patterns, and increasingly abstract and surreal sets. The opening number sends Chevalier dancing through a downpour that covers half the stage, and the film ends with the Academy Award-winning "Straw Hat" number, an elaborate set piece built around Chevalier's trademark boater hat, which becomes the basis for crazy props and massive sets inspired by the texture of the simple straw hat.

Even though he was in Hollywood, Chevalier proved to be a major attraction for French audiences, and French language versions of his Hollywood pictures were routinely produced simultaneously with the American shoot. The overseas version of this film, titled simply Folies-Bergère, also included alternate versions of the dance numbers with the chorus girls performing as they do on the stage of the real Folies Bergère: topless. American audiences were not so privileged and had to settle for double entendres and suggestive dialogue like: "If I can't be happy with another man's wife, how can I be happy with one of my own?"

"I got a kick" out of making Folies Bergère de Paris, Chevalier told the New York Times, "and although I did not think I was a great actor or that the picture was a masterpiece, it was something new and different." But Chevalier had become frustrated with the direction of his career in Hollywood and it became his last American picture for over two decades. He broke his contract with MGM and returned to France and to the stage. He didn't return to American screens until Billy Wilder cast him in the 1957 Love in the Afternoon, the beginning of a brief American comeback.

Meanwhile, Folies Bergère de Paris was remade twice, as That Night in Rio (1941) with Alice Faye headlining and Don Ameche in Chevalier's role and On the Riviera (1951) with Danny Kaye in the double role and Gene Tierney and Corinne Calvet as the women in his life.

by Sean Axmaker

Sources:
"The Good Frenchman: The True Story of the Life and Times of Maurice Chevalier," Edward Behr. Villard Books, 1993.
"Maurice Chevalier," Michael Freedland. William Morrow and Co., 1981.
"Chevalier: The Films and Career of Maurice Chevalier," Gene Ringgold and DeWitt Bodeen. Citadel Press, 1973.
IMDb
Folies Bergere De Paris

Folies Bergere de Paris

In Hollywood of the early 1930s, no one epitomized the romantic charm of France and continental sophistication of Paris better than Maurice Chevalier. The popular singer and nightclub entertainer had made his American film debut in the early sound era, where his boulevardier persona and lilting accent helped make him a major star in Ernst Lubitsch's witty musical comedies. But Chevalier was getting tired of playing what he called "the same old fellow," the seductive Frenchman sweeping women off their feet and into bed with a smile and wink, and he was battling Irving Thalberg over his MGM assignments when Fox producer Darryl F. Zanuck offered him the lead in Folies Bergère de Paris (1935), a musical comedy that moves from the Paris stage to the world of high society and high finance and back. Zanuck had negotiated the film rights for the legendary Paris show palace and developed the film (based on the play The Red Cat) for Charles Boyer. When Boyer declined, Chevalier took the part. The film offered Chevalier the opportunity to play two different roles: Folies Bergère headliner Eugene Charlier, a singer famed for his impersonation of Parisian millionaire Baron Fernand Cassini, and the banker and notorious womanizer Cassini himself. British beauty Merle Oberon (in one of her earliest American films) co-stars as Cassini's wife in "the perfect modern marriage" (they each go their own way) and Ann Sothern is Charlier's pathologically jealous girlfriend. The two men flirt with one another's partners, of course, but the play of mistaken and swapped identities gets comically complicated as identities are swapped back and forth and the women use the confusion to play their own games. The choreography by Dave Gould is right out of the Busby Berkeley playbook, with sets that expand back from the proscenium arch of the physical stage into impossibly epic spaces, dancers that multiply into small armies, overhead cameras that look down on a chorus forming elaborate geometric patterns, and increasingly abstract and surreal sets. The opening number sends Chevalier dancing through a downpour that covers half the stage, and the film ends with the Academy Award-winning "Straw Hat" number, an elaborate set piece built around Chevalier's trademark boater hat, which becomes the basis for crazy props and massive sets inspired by the texture of the simple straw hat. Even though he was in Hollywood, Chevalier proved to be a major attraction for French audiences, and French language versions of his Hollywood pictures were routinely produced simultaneously with the American shoot. The overseas version of this film, titled simply Folies-Bergère, also included alternate versions of the dance numbers with the chorus girls performing as they do on the stage of the real Folies Bergère: topless. American audiences were not so privileged and had to settle for double entendres and suggestive dialogue like: "If I can't be happy with another man's wife, how can I be happy with one of my own?" "I got a kick" out of making Folies Bergère de Paris, Chevalier told the New York Times, "and although I did not think I was a great actor or that the picture was a masterpiece, it was something new and different." But Chevalier had become frustrated with the direction of his career in Hollywood and it became his last American picture for over two decades. He broke his contract with MGM and returned to France and to the stage. He didn't return to American screens until Billy Wilder cast him in the 1957 Love in the Afternoon, the beginning of a brief American comeback. Meanwhile, Folies Bergère de Paris was remade twice, as That Night in Rio (1941) with Alice Faye headlining and Don Ameche in Chevalier's role and On the Riviera (1951) with Danny Kaye in the double role and Gene Tierney and Corinne Calvet as the women in his life. by Sean Axmaker Sources: "The Good Frenchman: The True Story of the Life and Times of Maurice Chevalier," Edward Behr. Villard Books, 1993. "Maurice Chevalier," Michael Freedland. William Morrow and Co., 1981. "Chevalier: The Films and Career of Maurice Chevalier," Gene Ringgold and DeWitt Bodeen. Citadel Press, 1973. IMDb

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern


Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern

Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Please, Monsieur Charlier. You know that kissing is not hygienic. Doctors claim that millions die each year from kissing.
- Perishot
Oh, yes? But what a pleasant way to die! Darling, kill me quick!
- Eugene Charlier
Rene, why don't you marry, get yourself a wife of your own, and leave me alone?
- Baroness Genevieve Cassini
If I can't be happy with another man's wife, how can I be happy with one of my own?
- Marquis Rene de Lac

Trivia

Notes

This film was also produced in a French-language version, L'homme des Folies Bergère. Reviews in March and April 1935 note that the English-language version's title had been changed to The Man from Folies Bergère. Although the complete name of this film as it appears in the screen credits is Folies Bergère de Paris, it is called Folies Bergère in reviews, studio records, copyright listings and modern sources. Reviews of the New York opening of the play The Red Cat, upon which this film was based, noted that it was presented with the backing of Twentieth Century Pictures. The Variety reviewer of the film commented that the play was a flop. According to the Motion Picture Herald review of the play, the character of "Baron Cassini" was based on "a combination of Otto Kahn, Match King [Ivar] Kreuger, with a touch of the late Monsieur [Serge Alexandre] Stavisky."

       According to a Daily Variety news item dated October 20, 1934, attorneys for the Folies Bergère in Paris attempted to halt production, charging that the film would cause the show irreparable damage. The studio, however, went ahead with the preparation and, according to the news item, photographed the theater from every angle. According to Dancing Times, Twentieth Century Pictures Vice-President in Charge of Production Darryl Zanuck, acquired in Paris the rights to use the title Folies Bergère.

       According to a pressbook in the copyright descriptions, Maurice Chevalier had been a star of the Folies Bergère, where he gained fame as the partner of the renowned performer Mistinguette. In the film he sings "Valentine," which, according to the pressbook, he sang originally in the Folies Bergère. Modern sources state that Charles Boyer was first offered the leading role, but because of his recent marriage to Pat Paterson, he declined and suggested Chevalier. Motion Picture Herald, in their review of the play, noted that Chevalier and Constance Bennett were rumored to be cast for the film. This was Merle Oberon's first Hollywood film. According to New York Times, she was paid $20,000. Modern sources state that Oberon at the time was engaged to Twentieth Century President Joseph M. Schenck.

       Daily Variety reported that Zanuck invited songwriters to an open competition to write songs for the film. He then let Chevalier select those he wanted to sing, and Chevalier chose Jack Meskill and Jack Stern's songs without hesitation, according to the news item. Information in the Produced Scripts Collection indicates that other songwriters who submitted songs included Con Conrad, Ann Ronell, Endor and Farrell, and Barry Trivers. In notes contained in the Produced Scripts Collection, Zanuck commented that he wanted a particular number in the film to emulate the "Shadow Waltz Number" from Gold Diggers of 1933 in that it should begin "intimately on the stage with Chevalier" and then develop "into a big production number with tremendous scope, which does not confine itself to the walls of the stage set, but allows us to develop with as much latitude as we want to." According to call sheets in the Produced Scripts Collection, Zanuck himself was scheduled to direct the "Hydraulic Hat Number," which became known as the "Straw Hat" number. This number, which May have been designed according to Zanuck's above comments, became one of two numbers for which dance director Dave Gould won an Academy Award for Best Dance Direction of 1935. (Please see the entry for Broadway Melody of 1936 for further information about Gould's award.) According to the pressbook, the "Straw Hat" number cost $100,000, while the film itself cost over $1,000,000. Also in this Produced Scripts Collection notes, Zanuck discussed a plan to use the Boswell Sisters "for a quick second chorus or a harmony chorus in the middle of some of the production numbers," but they do not appear in the film.

       According to the information in the Produced Scripts Collection, after the original ending for the film was shot, Zanuck ordered retakes and, in fact, wrote two new scenes himself. He complained that "Genevieve" in the original ending, "was too calm, too deliberate when she should have been unnerved and almost hysterical" and commented, "The trouble with the scene as it now stands is that it drags on and on and does not have a funny conclusion, and, after all this is a comedy."

       The French version, L'homme de Folies Bergère, was shot simultaneously with the English-language version, according to the call sheets in the Produced Scripts Collection. Zanuck, in a letter in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, stated that for the French version, he brought over "the best known translators and adaptors headed by Mr. Marcel Achard" and that he "borrowed from the Theatre Française the leading actors and imported some of the best known screen names." The screen credits for the French version noted that actor Fernand Ledoux was from the Comédie Française. Gossip columnist Sidney Skolsky's column of January 15, 1935 in DN was devoted to the filming of a scene in the French version at which he was present on the set. As Skolsky described the scene, the camera followed Chevalier backstage to reveal an onstage tableau of "nude girls." Skolsky noted that the shooting of the scene drew many observers and that the scene was taken over and over again. He also stated that the members of the regular dancing chorus refused to work in the sequence, because they feared the harm that might come to their later careers because of the scene, should they become stars. The studio, according to Skolsky, was then forced to hire professional models. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, PCA Director Joseph Breen inquired of Zanuck about the scene, and Zanuck informed him that the director of the French version "permitted several of the stage girls to walk through the various scenes with their breasts uncovered" and that he, Zanuck, allowed the director "to uncover the breasts of some of the people that were merely used as atmosphere backstage inasmuch as this picture has not been made for exhibition in America or any English speaking countries." Following this exchange, Will H. Hays, President of the MPPDA, informed Schenck that under an agreement reached by the MPPDA Board, there could be no deviation from the principles of the Production Code in the making of any picture in an American studio, and thus that there could be no shot allowed in the French version that would be objectionable under the Production Code. Hays commented in a letter to Schenck, "It would do real harm, indeed, if they ever start making in Hollywood pictures of nude breasts." Zanuck responded with an angry letter to Breen, in which he began, "Hasn't Mr. Hays got enough troubles of his own without trying to find something else to worry about?" He conceded that several scenes "photographed as background atmosphere only" contained "several French chorus girls with their breasts undraped. I have managed to eliminate them to the extent that they are quite inconspicuous." Zanuck went on to assure Breen, "Our French version could be seen tomorrow by any American audience and there would be nothing any more offensive in it than there is in the American version." In a letter dated March 21, 1935, Zanuck explained to Breen that he could not submit a print of the French version for review because the negative and only print had already been sent to France, where, because of an arrangement with the French United Artists Co., who financed the film, all further prints would be struck. However, Zanuck assured Breen that the French verison contained "no nude or undraped women-I saw to it that the one girl with her breasts uncovered was eliminated. You can assure the General [i.e. Hays] that he can sleep well; Hollywood has again upheld the true standards of France." On April 9, 1935, a contact in France wrote the Hays Office that he had viewed the film and "didn't see any naked breasts in it. All appear to be covered." When the French version played in New York in April 1936, Variety commented, "Rumor lane had it that the French version had been made a good deal more risque than the original. If so, it doesn't show as screened here."

       According to the call sheets in the Produced Scripts Collection, Ern Westmore did make-up for Merle Oberon's tests, and Gilbert Emery was originally cast as "Monsieur Paulet." Modern sources list as additional cast members in the French version, Ferdinand Munier, Albert Pollet, Mario Dominici and Olga Borget, and give the following additional credits: Chief sd eng E. H. Hansen; Art dir supv William Darling; Costumes Albert M. Levy. The film marked Chevalier's last American film until Love in the Afternoon in 1957. Chevalier did not return to Fox until he made the film Can-Can in 1960. Fox remade the film twice: in 1941 as That Night in Rio, directed by Irving Cummings and starring Alice Faye and Don Ameche; and in 1951 as On the Riviera, directed by Walter Lang and starring Danny Kaye and Gene Tierney.