The Flamingo Kid


1h 38m 1984

Brief Synopsis

In the early 60s a Brooklyn teenager gets a job waiting on the rich and the "shady" rich at a nearby beach club and comes of age in the process.

Film Details

Also Known As
Flamingo Kid, Mr. Hot Shot, Sweet Ginger Brown
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984
Production Company
William Schneiberg

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

In the early 60s a Brooklyn teenager gets a job waiting on the rich and the "shady" rich at a nearby beach club and comes of age in the process.

Crew

Nick Abdo

Associate Producer

Richard Adee

Property Master

Allan Amtzis

Casting Associate

Dave Appell

Song

Hank Ballard

Song

Nan Bernstein Freed

Production Associate

Acker Bilk

Song

Acker Bilk

Song Performer

Bumps Blackwell

Song

Janie Bradford

Song

Robert A Brennan

Dolly Grip

Irving Buchman

Makeup

Lucille Cannon

Auditor

Ray Charles

Song Performer

James A Contner

Director Of Photography

C Cooke

Song

Sam Cooke

Song

Sam Cooke

Song Performer

Anthony Cortino

Hair

Steve Crooper

Song

William Curry

Transportation Captain

Mike Delaney

Best Boy

Alan M Demkowicz

Hair

Don Digirolamo

Sound

Dion

Song Performer

Dion

Song

Ruth Doering

Costume Supervisor

Phil Downey

Color Timer

Lamont Dozier

Song

Duke Durfee

Art Director

Fleet Emerson

Casting

Gene Engels

Gaffer

Bettiann Fishman

Production Associate

Melinda Flurry

Other

Gary Foster

Production Associate

Diane Perkins Frazen

Other

Jesse Frederick

Song Performer

John Fundus

Boom Operator

Seth Gechter

Assistant

Robert W Glass

Sound

Elmo Glick

Song

Gerry Goffin

Song

Joanne Golden

Production Associate

Berry Gordy

Song

Penelope Gottlieb

Titles

Michael Green

Assistant Camera Operator

Christopher Griffin

Assistant Director

Robert Grimaldi

Hair

Earle Herdan

Editing

Brian Holland

Song

Eddie Holland

Song

Jack Hooper

Negative Cutting

Peter Ilardi

Sound

James J Isaacs

Sound Editor

Alan Jackson

Song

Johanna Jensen Santi

Production Associate

Booker T. Jones

Song

Jean J Jones

Assistant Editor

Thomas Kane

Production Manager

Ben E. King

Song

Ben E. King

Song Performer

Carole King

Song

Robert Knudson

Sound

Kenneth Kopro

Production Associate

Jerry Leiber

Song

Jay Levy

Assistant Camera Operator

Lewis

Song

Stephen Lim

Assistant Director

Michael Lindgren

Other

Little Richard

Song Performer

William Loger

Costume Supervisor

Kimberly Louis

Dialogue Coach

Chuck Lum

Production Associate

Harry Lynott

Construction Coordinator

Ronnie Mack

Song

Harry Madsen

Stunt Coordinator

Kal Mann

Song

John Marascalco

Song

Ernest Maresca

Song

Garry Marshall

Screenplay

Lori Marshall

Researcher

Neal Marshall

From Story

Neal Marshall

Screenplay

Arlene Matza

Theme Lyrics

Curtis Mayfield

Song

David Mccann

Post-Production Supervisor

Mark Mcgann

Assistant Director

Robert Mellin

Song

Lawrence Miller

Production Designer

Michael Wayne Miller

Key Grip

Ellen Mirojnick

Costume Designer

Colin C Mouat

Sound Editor

Priscilla Nedd-friendly

Editor

Peter R Norman

Camera Operator

Kevin O'callaghan

Other

Kevin O'callaghan

Special Effects

Sy Oliver

Song

Barbie Painter

Production Associate

Carroll Payne

Song

Michael Phillips

Producer

Martha Pinson

Script Supervisor

William F. Reynolds

Props

Gene Ritchings

Production Associate

Hank Salerno

Adr Editor

Bennett Salvay

Song

David Sardi

Production Associate

Thomas Sarr

Other

Jill Savitt

Assistant Editor

William Schneiberg

Cable Operator

Jim Schurmann

Color Timer

Ellen H. Schwartz

Dga Trainee

Norman B Schwartz

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Mickey Scott

Makeup

Pamela Sharp

Assistant Editor

James Simcik

Adr Editor

Margery Simkin

Casting Director

Curt Sobel

Sound Editor

Curt Sobel

Song

Susan Steed

Other

Lewis Steinberg

Song

Max Steiner

Song

Mike Stoller

Song

Barrett Strong

Song Performer

Alesandra Tabor

Production Coordinator

Doris Troy

Song Performer

John F Volpe

Dolly Grip

W.g. Snuffy Walden

Song

Don Warner

Sound Editor

Fred Weiler

Set Decorator

Josh Weiner

Photography

David A. Whittaker

Sound Editor

Flo Williamson

Assistant Editor

Florence Williamson

Assistant Editor

Bob Yorberg

Technical Advisor

Susan Zwerman

Location Manager

Film Details

Also Known As
Flamingo Kid, Mr. Hot Shot, Sweet Ginger Brown
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984
Production Company
William Schneiberg

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

Richard Crenna, 1927-2002


Actor Richard Crenna, the versatile, highly respected character actor of television and film, died on December 17 of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He was 75.

Born on November 30, 1927 in Los Angeles, California, Crenna was the son of a pharmacist father and a mother who managed a number of small hotels in the Los Angles area the family owned, where Crenna was raised. At the tender age of 11, he was encouraged by a teacher to audition for a radio show, "Boy Scout Jamboree" at the nearby KFI-AM radio studio. Little did he realize that it would be the start of a very long and prosperous career.

Crenna found steady radio work for the next several years, culminating in 1948 with his breakthrough role of the goofy, squeaky-voiced Walter Denton in the hit radio series Our Miss Brooks. Crenna carried the momentum of his success to television when he spent four more seasons as Walter on Our Miss Brooks (1952-1956). Almost immediately after the run of that show, Crenna scored another hit series as Luke McCoy in the rustic comedy The Real McCoys (1957-1963) co-starring Walter Brennan.

Although he had been acting in films since the early '50s Crenna roles didn't come to critical notice until the mid '60s, appearing in Robert Wise's acclaimed The Sand Pebbles (1966) as the stalwart gunboat captain co-starring Steve McQueen; Terence Young's intense thriller, Wait Until Dark (1967), as a criminal who terrorizes a blind Audrey Hepburn; and another Robert Wise film, the Gertrude Lawrence biopic Star! (1968) playing the high profile role of Richard Aldrich opposite Julie Andrews.

Crenna's profile slowed down in the '70s, despite a brief return to television comedy in Norman Lear's political satire All's Fair (1976-1977) with Bernadette Peters. That show may not have lasted long, but Crenna bounced back with a resurgence in the '80s with a string of hit character parts: Lawrence Kasden's stylish film noir Body Heat (1981), as Kathleen Turner's ill-fated husband; Ted Kotchoff's hit Rambo: First Blood (1982), as Colonel Samuel Trautman, Sylvester Stallone's former Commander; Gary Marshall's excellent coming-of-age tale The Flamingo Kid (1984), one of his best performances (for which he received a Golden Globe nomination) as a smooth, charismatic gin-rummy champ who takes Matt Dillon under his tutelage; and many other quality roles in theatrical and made for television movies.

At the time of his death, Crenna was a member of the Screen Actors Guild board of directors and had a recurring role in the hit CBS dramatic series Judging Amy. In addition to Penni, his wife of 47 years, Crenna is survived by a son, Richard, two daughters, Seana and Maria, and three granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Richard Crenna, 1927-2002

Richard Crenna, 1927-2002

Actor Richard Crenna, the versatile, highly respected character actor of television and film, died on December 17 of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He was 75. Born on November 30, 1927 in Los Angeles, California, Crenna was the son of a pharmacist father and a mother who managed a number of small hotels in the Los Angles area the family owned, where Crenna was raised. At the tender age of 11, he was encouraged by a teacher to audition for a radio show, "Boy Scout Jamboree" at the nearby KFI-AM radio studio. Little did he realize that it would be the start of a very long and prosperous career. Crenna found steady radio work for the next several years, culminating in 1948 with his breakthrough role of the goofy, squeaky-voiced Walter Denton in the hit radio series Our Miss Brooks. Crenna carried the momentum of his success to television when he spent four more seasons as Walter on Our Miss Brooks (1952-1956). Almost immediately after the run of that show, Crenna scored another hit series as Luke McCoy in the rustic comedy The Real McCoys (1957-1963) co-starring Walter Brennan. Although he had been acting in films since the early '50s Crenna roles didn't come to critical notice until the mid '60s, appearing in Robert Wise's acclaimed The Sand Pebbles (1966) as the stalwart gunboat captain co-starring Steve McQueen; Terence Young's intense thriller, Wait Until Dark (1967), as a criminal who terrorizes a blind Audrey Hepburn; and another Robert Wise film, the Gertrude Lawrence biopic Star! (1968) playing the high profile role of Richard Aldrich opposite Julie Andrews. Crenna's profile slowed down in the '70s, despite a brief return to television comedy in Norman Lear's political satire All's Fair (1976-1977) with Bernadette Peters. That show may not have lasted long, but Crenna bounced back with a resurgence in the '80s with a string of hit character parts: Lawrence Kasden's stylish film noir Body Heat (1981), as Kathleen Turner's ill-fated husband; Ted Kotchoff's hit Rambo: First Blood (1982), as Colonel Samuel Trautman, Sylvester Stallone's former Commander; Gary Marshall's excellent coming-of-age tale The Flamingo Kid (1984), one of his best performances (for which he received a Golden Globe nomination) as a smooth, charismatic gin-rummy champ who takes Matt Dillon under his tutelage; and many other quality roles in theatrical and made for television movies. At the time of his death, Crenna was a member of the Screen Actors Guild board of directors and had a recurring role in the hit CBS dramatic series Judging Amy. In addition to Penni, his wife of 47 years, Crenna is survived by a son, Richard, two daughters, Seana and Maria, and three granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984

Re-released in United States on Video February 21, 1995

Completed shooting in 1984.

Todd-AO

Re-released in United States on Video February 21, 1995