Finger Of Guilt


1h 35m 1956
Finger Of Guilt

Brief Synopsis

Blackmail threatens an American filmmaker's attempts to rebuild his career in England.

Film Details

Also Known As
Intimate Stranger, The
Genre
Drama
Mystery
Thriller
Release Date
1956

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

Blackmail threatens an American filmmaker's attempts to rebuild his career in England.

Film Details

Also Known As
Intimate Stranger, The
Genre
Drama
Mystery
Thriller
Release Date
1956

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Articles

Finger of Guilt -


Finger of Guilt is the American release title of Joseph Losey's Intimate Stranger (1956), a psychological thriller that the American expatriate directed in Great Britain after having been branded a Communist sympathizer in Hollywood. After directing one film in Italy and having been asked to leave France, a penniless Losey migrated to England, where he struck a deal with producer Nat Cohen to make three low budget features for a meager payment of £1,000 per film (plus percentages). Scripted by Howard Koch (another Tinseltown refugee, who was "grey listed" after scripting Warner Bros.' Stalin-friendly Mission to Moscow in 1943), Finger of Guilt is Losey's only film about the film industry, the story of an American producer who assumes control of his British father-in-law's film studio, only to become the target of a blackmailer. It is to Losey's credit as an artist that Finger of Guilt was not a roman à clef by which he might have painted himself as a victim but rather an honest appraisal of a man whose fate is tied to his inability to accept responsibility for his past transgressions. While Koch signed the film as "Peter Howard," Losey allowed directorial credit to go to producer Alec C. Snowden, though publicity materials for foreign markets gave him credit as "Joseph Walton." Made on the cheap (with Shepperton Studios playing the fictitious "Commonwealth Studios"), Finger of Guilt nonetheless boasts a topflight supporting cast in Roger Livesey (The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp), Mervyn Johns (Dead of Night), and Mary Murphy, Marlon Brando's leading lady in The Wild One (1954).

By Richard Harland Smith
Finger Of Guilt -

Finger of Guilt -

Finger of Guilt is the American release title of Joseph Losey's Intimate Stranger (1956), a psychological thriller that the American expatriate directed in Great Britain after having been branded a Communist sympathizer in Hollywood. After directing one film in Italy and having been asked to leave France, a penniless Losey migrated to England, where he struck a deal with producer Nat Cohen to make three low budget features for a meager payment of £1,000 per film (plus percentages). Scripted by Howard Koch (another Tinseltown refugee, who was "grey listed" after scripting Warner Bros.' Stalin-friendly Mission to Moscow in 1943), Finger of Guilt is Losey's only film about the film industry, the story of an American producer who assumes control of his British father-in-law's film studio, only to become the target of a blackmailer. It is to Losey's credit as an artist that Finger of Guilt was not a roman à clef by which he might have painted himself as a victim but rather an honest appraisal of a man whose fate is tied to his inability to accept responsibility for his past transgressions. While Koch signed the film as "Peter Howard," Losey allowed directorial credit to go to producer Alec C. Snowden, though publicity materials for foreign markets gave him credit as "Joseph Walton." Made on the cheap (with Shepperton Studios playing the fictitious "Commonwealth Studios"), Finger of Guilt nonetheless boasts a topflight supporting cast in Roger Livesey (The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp), Mervyn Johns (Dead of Night), and Mary Murphy, Marlon Brando's leading lady in The Wild One (1954). By Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 1956

Losey and Koch were blacklisted durning the McCarthy era and made this film under psuedonyms.

Released in United States Fall October 1956