The Fabulous Suzanne


1h 10m 1946

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 15, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.; Steve Sekely Productions
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Beautiful Suzanne O'Neill works as a waitress in a diner owned by baker William Harris. Bill and Suzanne are engaged, but Bill refuses to name the wedding date until he has enough money so that Suzanne will not have to work. Fed up with waiting for the overly proud Bill, Suzanne distracts herself by employing her "lucky" pin to pick out winning horses for gambler Jonathan Tuttle. The nervous Tuttle passes away one day, and Suzanne is astonished to learn that he has left her seven thousand dollars, even though she had thought that he was penniless. Suzanne offers the money to Bill to build a larger diner, and when he refuses, she returns his ring and leaves to seek her fortune in New York City. After sticking her pin in the phone book, Suzanne goes to the investing firm of Hendrick Courtney, Sr. and Sons. Hendrick "Hank" Courtney, Jr. is flabbergasted when her pin picks a profit-making stock. Suzanne quickly amasses a tidy sum, while both the dour Hank and his fun-loving younger brother Rex fall in love with her. Suzanne entertains herself by dating both men, but her heart still belongs to Bill. With Hank's help, Suzanne sends Bill some money as if it had been left to him by his late aunt. Bill soon has his new diner, but waitress Mary, who wants Bill for herself, tries to convince Bill that Suzanne would never leave her fast-paced, luxury-filled lifestyle to return to him. Meanwhile, Suzanne is also being pursued by Rex and Hank's father, whose suave charm endears him to the former waitress. Nonetheless, Suzanne attends Bill's grand opening with the hope of reconciling with him. Her hopes are dashed, however, by Mary, who lies and tells her that she is now engaged to Bill. The crushed Suzanne leaves and sends Bill a congratulatory note. After he receives it, Bill heads for New York to set the record straight. The couple go for a romantic coach ride in the park, but when they return to Suzanne's apartment, they find all three Courtneys looking for Suzanne. After a madcap encounter with the other men, Bill angrily denounces Suzanne and the couple break off their burgeoning reunion. Once again desolate, Suzanne agrees to marry one of the brothers without specifying which one. On the day of the wedding, both Rex and Hank are left standing at the altar, as Courtney, Sr. has spirited Suzanne away. Realizing that Suzanne truly loves Bill, he takes her in search of him, only to discover that Bill has deserted the new diner. They find him re-opening the old diner, and with the help of her trusty pin, Suzanne wins an embrace from Bill.

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 15, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.; Steve Sekely Productions
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Actor Frank Darien's surname is mistakenly spelled "Darian" in the onscreen credits, and photographer Henry Sharp's name is misspelled "Sharpe." According to Hollywood Reporter news items, due to a lack of stage space on the Republic lot, the picture was also filmed at Consolidated, Gordon Street and PRC Studios. Although an March 8, 1946 Hollywood Reporter news item includes Herbert Evans in the cast, his appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Richard Denning was borrowed from Paramount for the production. According to a March 19, 1946 Hollywood Reporter news item, Republic prepared a large advertising campaign aimed at the Hungarian-American population, hoping to capitalize on the appearance of Hungarian actress Iren Agay, who made her American film debut in The Fabulous Suzanne.
       The film features a scene in which "Hank" disparages the "yowling" of a nightclub singer named Rudy Vallee and wonders why the crooner cannot get "an honest job." Although the Variety review judged the scene to be "laugh-provoking," the Hollywood Reporter review termed it a gag that had "grown tired through repetition."