Exclusive


1h 25m 1937

Film Details

Also Known As
Things Began to Happen
Release Date
Aug 6, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Roaring Girl by John C. Moffitt (Los Angeles, 4 Feb 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

When Mountain City racketeer Charles Gillette is acquitted, he arrives at the Mountain City World newsroom and vows revenge on the Better Government Committee who put him behind bars. Members of the committee include Colonel Bogardus, owner of the World , Horace Mitchell, a candidate for mayor, and Mr. Franklin, a department store owner. First Gillette buys a rival newspaper, the Sentinel , and offers a pricey editorship to World newsman Ralph Houston, who refuses the offer on principle. That evening, Ralph and his partner, Tod Swain, are greeted at home by a creditor, and Vina Swain, Ralph's fiancée, is furious to find out he turned down Gillette's offer. When she learns Ralph went into debt to put her through college, she warns Gillette of a police raid and pays back Ralph's debt with Gillette's renumeration. When Ralph orders Vina not to work for Gillette, she breaks their engagement. Gillette then terrorizes city shopkeepers and newsstands into advertising in the Sentinel and assigns Vina to find evidence of scandal in Mitchell's house, which would damage his reputation. Vina then prints a story that names Mitchell as an ex-convict and ruins his political career. Tod tells Vina that the World previously had refrained from printing the story because Mitchell's public service record had proved him a good man. Mitchell then kills himself in front of Vina, and Tod, to teach her a lesson, prints an article that blames Vina for Mitchell's death. Gillette's next target, Mr. Franklin, is accused of having antiquated elevators in his store, and sues the Sentinel for libel. The World then stages a public safety test of the elevators, and Gillette's henchman, Beak McArdle, who wears a cameo ring, greases the elevator cables, hoping to sabotage the test. The accident occurs after the test, however, and a few people are killed and Ralph is injured. Hearing of Ralph's injury, Gillette rushes Vina out of town on assignment with McArdle, who then receives orders from Gillette to kill her. When Ralph arrives at the Swains' delirious, Tod figures out Gillette's part in the accident and rushes to save Vina. Pretending to be drunk, Tod tells McArdle he found his ring in a grease can at the store and forces a confession that indicts Gillette. Tod then has McArdle arrested, and Gillette's men chase Vina and Tod's car. Tod is shot, but drives Vina safely to the World newsroom, where he finishes his story and dies. The colonel then announces his sale of the World to Gillette. The next day, when headlines blame Gillette for the elevator murders, townspeople storm the Sentinel headquarters and Gillette is finally apprehended. Franklin and the Better Government Committee then buy the World and put the recovered Ralph in charge.

Cast

Fred Macmurray

Ralph Houston

Frances Farmer

Vina Swain

Charles Ruggles

Tod Swain

Lloyd Nolan

Charles Gillette

Fay Holden

Mrs. Swain

Ralph Morgan

Horace Mitchell

Edward H. Robins

Colonel Bogardus

Harlan Briggs

Springer

Willard Robertson

Mr. Franklin

Horace Macmahon

Beak [McArdle]

William Mansell

Formby

Gaylord Pendleton

Elliott

Chester Clute

Garner

Irving Bacon

Dr. Boomgarten

Frank Bruno

Lollipop

James Blakeley

Mr. Walton

Sam Hayes

Radio announcer

Bennie Bartlett

Boy

Mack Gray

Secretary

Edward Churchill

Advertising manager

John Kelly

Cab driver

Richard Allen

Policeman

Edward Hearn

Policeman

Jack Daley

Policeman

Dick Rush

Policeman

Mariska Aldrich

Policewoman

Antrim Short

Messenger boy

Frances Morris

Beak's wife

Billy Lee

Beak's child

Pat West

Santa Claus

Sam Ash

Elevator starter

Charlene Wyatt

Girl in elevator

Almeda Fowler

Mrs. Mitchell

Spec O'donnell

Telephone boy

Ann Marsters

Reporter

Billy Arnold

Reporter

Hubbard Keavy

Reporter

Clark Wales

Reporter

Paul Harrison

Reporter

Erskine Johnson

Reporter

Harold Heffernan

Reporter

Jack Chapin

Reed

Oscar G. Hendrian

Janitor

Harry Hayden

City editor

Joseph De Stephani

Foreman

Ray Turner

Bellboy

Frank Puglia

Johnny

Joe Cunningham

Editor

Frank Hammond

Switchman

Libby Taylor

Maid

Bill Franey

News vendor

Jack Cheatham

Rioter

Dick Baldry

Rioter

Alfred Sears

Rioter

Freddie Lord

Rioter

Jimmie Dime

Rioter

Tex Higginson

Rioter

Margaret Fealy

Rioter

Carol Holloway

Rioter

Lou Salter

Rioter

James Quinn

Rioter

Robert E. Milasch

Gangster

Max Davidson

Tailor

Gertrude Simpson

Ricca Allen

Ethel Clayton

Gloria Williams

Film Details

Also Known As
Things Began to Happen
Release Date
Aug 6, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Roaring Girl by John C. Moffitt (Los Angeles, 4 Feb 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a March 11, 1937 Hollywood Reporter news item, this film's title originally was Exclusive and was temporarily changed to Things Began to Happen. Although a 1937 copyright statement is listed on the viewed print, the title is not listed in the copyright register. A news item in Hollywood Reporter on March 13, 1937 states that director Alexander Hall and producer Benjamin Glazer left the previous evening for Richmond, near Tanforan, CA, to scout waterfront locations for this film, although it is unclear where the location shooting actually took place. Numerous reviews mentioned cast members' affiliation with newspapers: John C. Moffitt worked for the Kansas City Star, Benjamin Glazer was part of the old Philadelphia Press, and Rian James was employed by the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. This story May have been inspired by the real-life political scandal that was going on in Los Angeles at the time of the production involving Mayor Frank Shaw, who was investigated by Clifford Clinton and his C.I.V.I.C. Committee (Citizens Independent Vice Investigating Committee). The Shaw scandal included rival newspapers the Los Angeles Times and the Citizen News.