Ever Since Eve


1h 12m 1934

Film Details

Also Known As
The Heir to the Hoorah
Release Date
Feb 9, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Heir to the Hoorah by Paul Armstrong, produced by Kirke LaShelle (New York, 10 Apr 1905).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Film Length
6,650ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Neil Rogers lives with his three foster fathers, Jim Wood, Horace Sanders and Dave Martin, at the site of their mine, the Hoorah, in Nevada. When Jim, Horace and Dave discover that a trip must be made to New York City in order to pick up mechanical parts for the mine, Neil volunteers with alacrity. Having decided that Neil must be saved from the treachery of the female sex, however, Jim, Horace and Dave refuse to allow him to go to the city, where they fear he may be exposed to feminine wiles. Winning a card draw, Neil makes the trip to New York anyway, with Horace as his chaperone. Waking up in the early hours of the morning as if they were on the ranch, Horace and Neil ride horses in Central Park, and Neil encounters Elizabeth Vandegrift, who has jumped into a creek for a hundred dollar bet with one of her decadent friends. Neil rescues her and then takes her on his horse as the police chase them out of the park. While Jim and Dave wire Neil and Horace demanding to know what is delaying them, Neil and Beth begin to see one another frequently. Neil and Beth marry, and on the train to Nevada, Beth admits with candor that she wouldn't have married Neil if he were poor. The next morning, Neil, embittered, asks Beth to pretend that she loves him and promises to pay her for her trouble, a statement which perplexes the young bride, who really loves her husband. At the ranch in Nevada, Jim and Dave at first greet Beth with suspicion. After she proves herself a devoted wife and a wiz in the kitchen, however, the older men systematically fall in love with the new lady in the house. Neil is injured in a mine explosion and, in a delirium, reveals that he thinks Beth only wants his money. Beth leaves at Neil's request much to his foster fathers' chagrin. The reformed misogynists send Neil to New York to retrieve Beth, and when he finds her in a club dancing with her old friend Tony, she kisses Tony in order to make her husband jealous. Neil storms out and then flees to China to escape his pain. Beth goes back to the ranch and tells the boys that she is pregnant, impressing on them how important it is that she find Neil. Beth gives birth to a boy, and Neil arrives a few weeks later. The new mother asks that the baby be kept a secret until Neil can forgive her. At a party assembled for Neil's homecoming, Jim, Horace and Dave hire a gang to stage Beth's kidnapping, and when Neil rescues her, the two realize that they want to be together. After the reconciliation, Beth shows Neil their son, and they embrace as Jim, Horace and Dave dance happily outside the bedroom window.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Heir to the Hoorah
Release Date
Feb 9, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Heir to the Hoorah by Paul Armstrong, produced by Kirke LaShelle (New York, 10 Apr 1905).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Film Length
6,650ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credits sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. The working title of this film was The Heir to the Hoorah. According to the legal files, Denis Morrison wrote a treatment for the film that was not purchased by the studio, and Dorothy Fletcher, Leonard Spigelgass and Philip Dunne produced work based on Morrison's treatment, but none of this material was used in the final film. This was George O'Brien's last film produced by Fox. According to Daily Variety and Hollywood Reporter news items, Malcolm St. Clair, the original director, withdrew after four days of shooting because of a difference of opinion concerning the screenplay, and George Marshall, who had been the production supervisor, took over as director. According to Daily Variety, some scenes were shot at Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA. Paramount Pictures Corp. released a film based on the same source in 1916 entitled The Heir to the Hoorah, which was produced by Famous Players-Lasky Corp., directed by William C. de Mille and starred Thomas Meighan and Anita King (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.1838).