Eve of Destruction


1h 40m 1991

Brief Synopsis

The robot known as Eve was designed to be a weapon for peace. But when something goes wrong during Eve's shakedown tests, the android snaps and launches a killing spree that may end in nuclear annihilation, and only a terrorism expert stands in her way.

Film Details

Also Known As
Ange de la destruction, L', L' Ange de la destruction
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Valencia, California, USA; San Francisco, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m

Synopsis

The robot known as Eve was designed to be a weapon for peace. But when something goes wrong during Eve's shakedown tests, the android snaps and launches a killing spree that may end in nuclear annihilation, and only a terrorism expert stands in her way.

Crew

Frans J Afman

Consultant

Karyn L Alexander

Production Assistant

Kenny Alexander

Stunts

John Anderson

Driver

Raymond M Banigan

Driver

Lissa Barkwer

Production Coordinator

Gary Baxley

Stunts

Bob Bender

Assistant Director

Kimberly N Bennett

Assistant Editor

Sheryl Berkoff-lowe

Makeup

Brian Bernstein

Assistant Camera Operator

Caroline Biggerstaff

Editor

Chris Biggs

Makeup

Marsha Blackburn

Photography

Richard L Blackwell

Stunts

Carissa Blix

Casting

Fritz Braden

Transportation Coordinator

Brent Brewington

Boom Operator

Judith Brown

Other

Kelly Cabral

Rerecording

Jeff Cadiente

Stunts

Kevin Caffrey

Grip

Mike Cain

Electrician

Carina Camamile-barr

Assistant

Keith Campbell

Stunts

Pat Carman

Other

Tina Marie Carriere

Props Assistant

Giovanni Casalenuovo

Other

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Zane Cassidy

Stunts

Carlos Cave

Stand-In

Marienus Cetani

Other

Daryk Christian

Technical Advisor

T W Chu

Assistant Camera Operator

Joseph Cicio

Assistant Camera Operator

Martin Coblenz

Driver

Heather Conroy

Casting

David H Cooper

Driver

Glen Cooper

Other

Robert Cort

Executive Producer

Douglas M Crawford

Props

Everett Creach

Stunts

Gary Cruise

Driver

Phil Culotta

Stunts

Gary Dally

Driver

Dock A Davis

Props

Mike Davis

Production

Catherine Demeis

Production Coordinator

Rodney Dennis

Craft Service

Scott Frank Deshields

Foreman

Larry Dimauro

Electrician

Mark Donaldson

Stunts

Jessica Drake

Dialect Coach

Sherry Dreizen

Props Assistant

Robert Dreyer

Props

Clint Duvall

Props

Sandy Dvore

Titles

Kevin Edwards

Grip

Paul A. Edwards

Camera Operator

Ousaun Elam

Stunts

John A Escobar

Stunts

Debbie Evans

Stunts

Antonio Faretta

Other

Dennis Fill

Costumes

Ken Fisher

Steadicam Operator

Cliff Fleming

Stunts

Charles Edward Flint

Props

Cindy Folkerson

Stunts

Jeffrey Frink

Special Effects

Kelcey Fry

Makeup

Steve Galich

Special Effects Coordinator

Duncan Gibbins

Screenplay

Janet Gilmore

Casting Assistant

Alan Gitlin

Assistant Camera Operator

Charles Gray

Props

Bonnie Grossblatt

Production Supervisor

Kimberly Guenther

Costumes

Mando Guerrero

Stunts

Peter Gulla

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Hachey

Props

Mary Hallman-ramirez

Production Coordinator

Wayne Harbour

Grip

Ronald R Harris

Foley Mixer

Val Harris

On-Set Dresser

David Harshbarger

Property Master

Orwin Harvey

Stunts

Graham Henderson

Co-Executive Producer

Diane Hintz

Grip

Robin Hinz

Set Designer

Brent P Hirn

Grip

Tom Hoeck

Other

Larry Holt

Stunts

Alan Hume

Director Of Photography

Martin Hume

Camera Operator

John A Huskins

Driver

Niels Irgens-moller

Driver

Terry Jackson

Stunts

Matthew Jacobs

Art Director

Melinda Jason

Executive Producer

James Jensen

Assistant Camera Operator

Lynn Johanson

Other

John M Johnson

Stunts

Gordon K Kee

Production Accountant

Billy Kelly

Swing Gang

Chris Kennard

Dolly Grip

David Koneff

Set Decorator

Tom Kramer

Song Performer

Tom Kramer

Song

Tom Kramer

Music Editor

Philip M Krystosek

Assistant Director

Tammy Kusian

Hair Stylist

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Peter Lamont

Production Designer

William T Lane

Stunts

Lane Leavitt

Stunts

Jules Lichtman

Assistant Director

David Lindup

Original Music

Marci Liroff

Casting

Frank Lloyd

Stunts

Kimberly Lord

Apprentice

Vincent Lozano

Props

Walter Lucas

Other

Brian R Lukas

Electrician

Brett Mabry

Electrician

James A Macdonald

Props

Don Macdougall

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

David Madden

Producer

Dessie Markovsky

Sound Designer

Dessie Markovsky

Sound Editor

Jeff Mart

Steadicam Operator

Bob Mayberry

Electrician

William Mccaughey

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Dwayne Mcgee

Stunts

Tim Mchenry

Driver

Tony Meade

Production Assistant

Carey Meyer

On-Set Dresser

David Michels

Dolly Grip

Mike Milliken

Color Timer

Mindy

Song Performer

Wayne Montanio

Stunts

Paula Moody

Stunts

Robert R Moore

Transportation Captain

T A Moore

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

William L Morrison

Driver

Ron Moser

Construction Coordinator

Amy Ness

Location Manager

Angela Nogaro

Hair Assistant

Angela Nogaro

Makeup Assistant

Randy Nolen

Steadicam Operator

Terry O'brien

Dolly Grip

Mike Paventi

Driver

Nat Peck

Music Contractor

Reinhart Peschke

Gaffer

John F Peterson

Driver

Ron Peterson

Props

Joseph Ponticelle

Assistant Camera Operator

Harry Rabinowitz

Music Conductor

Emile Razpopov

Sound Editor

Emile Razpopov

Sound Designer

Bill Reed

Props

P Bradford Reed

Assistant Camera Operator

Ross Reynolds

Stunts

Brad Ricker

Assistant Art Director

Steven Riley

Special Effects

Richard Robbins

Props

Mario Roberts

Stunts

Jack Roe

Unit Production Manager

Tim Roe

Assistant Camera Operator

Doug Roosendahl

Driver

David Russell

Production Assistant

Philippe Sarde

Music

Philippe Sarde

Music Arranger

Christopher Saunders

Stunts

Frank Scheidbach

Electrician

Dan Schlax

Props

Harold Schlax

Foreman

Robin Schreer

Assistant

Michael Schultz

Caterer

Pat Schunk

Song Performer

Pat Schunk

Song

Deborah Scott

Costume Designer

John-clay Scott

Stunts

Tim Segulin

Motion Control

Tim Segulin

Other

Adr Voice Services

Other

Dylan Shepherd

Key Grip

John Shoemaker

Electrician

Mark Skupen

Grip

James Smith

Grip

Marcee Smith

Costumes

Jeff Smolek

Stunts

David Snell

Song

Kurt Soderling

Assistant Camera Operator

Karen Sorum

Other

Impact Sound

Sound

Donald F Spinney

Animal Trainer

John Stabile

Grip

Paul Stader

Stunts

Edward Steidele

Foley Artist

Jonathan Earl Stein

Sound

Film Details

Also Known As
Ange de la destruction, L', L' Ange de la destruction
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Valencia, California, USA; San Francisco, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m

Articles

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States on Video September 11, 1991

Released in United States Winter January 18, 1991

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 28 - March 8, 1991.

Began shooting December 11, 1989.

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 28 - March 8, 1991.)

Released in United States Winter January 18, 1991

Released in United States on Video September 11, 1991