Eva


2h 35m 1964

Brief Synopsis

A dark tale set in Venice, about a con-man/writer, Stanley Baker who seems to have it all: an international best-seller that's already a hit film, a house in Rome, a venetian farmhouse, not to mention a sweet and gorgeous fiancee, yet he's bitter. Stanley meets his existential match in mod courtesan

Film Details

Also Known As
Eve, The Devil's Woman
MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1964
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 28 Oct 1964
Production Company
Interopa Film; Paris-Films Production
Distribution Company
Times Film Corp.
Country
France
Location
Rome, Italy; Venice, Italy
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Eve by James Hadley Chase (London, 1945).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 35m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In Venice Tyvian Jones, purported author of the autobiography of a Welsh coal miner, reaps the profits of the book's cinematic adaptation. He is, however, an impostor, the book being the work of his dead brother. Though engaged to Francesca, a screenwriter, Tyvian becomes madly infatuated with Eva, a French woman of pleasure, whom he encounters unexpectedly in his own apartment, where she and a lover have sought refuge during a storm. After ejecting her male friend, Tyvian attempts to seduce Eva, whereupon she knocks him out with an ashtray. Tyvian nevertheless follows Eva to Rome, where he woos her with promises of a Venetian holiday. During the idyll Eva demands an extravagant hotel suite, gambling stakes, and compensation for her sexual favors, humiliating him further by scorning the sum he offers her. Following the abortive weekend, Tyvian marries Francesca, only to betray her with Eva during their honeymoon. Discovering the two together, Francesca commits suicide in a speedboat. After her funeral Tyvian visits Eva. Although he intends to kill her, he can only proclaim his love. Disgusted, Eva flogs him with a riding whip and ushers him from her flat. On a Venetian holiday 2 years later, Eva encounters Tyvian, now an impecunious guide but still infatuated with her. Despite his ardent supplications, Eva shuns him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Eve, The Devil's Woman
MPAA Rating
Release Date
Jan 1964
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 28 Oct 1964
Production Company
Interopa Film; Paris-Films Production
Distribution Company
Times Film Corp.
Country
France
Location
Rome, Italy; Venice, Italy
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Eve by James Hadley Chase (London, 1945).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 35m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

Eva - EVA or EVE? - TWO VERSIONS OF A JOSEPH LOSEY FILM


In 1962, after toiling in the British B-movie industry for years, blacklisted director Joseph Losey was finally offered a promising project and a lucrative contract from the producing team of Robert and Raymond Hakim (Belle de Jour, 1967). With a pulp fiction novel by James Hadley Chase as his source material and Venice, Italy during the off season as his setting, Losey created a dark, wintry tale about an obsessive but destructive relationship entitled Eva (1963). Jeanne Moreau plays the title role - a seductress but also a destroyer. Her new victim is Tyvian Jones (Stanley Baker), a renowned Scottish writer who has an adoring fiancee (Virna Lisi) and a promising career ahead of him. But there are major chinks in Jones' self-confident facade. His deep-seated feelings of guilt - over claiming credit for his dead brother's novel and reaping international fame - are beginning to erupt in acts of self-loathing and disgust which are only intensified by his masochistic relationship with the enigmatic Eva.

Eva was originally intended as a three hour drama but Losey was forced to cut it down to a two and a half hour running time by his producers. In that form, the film enjoyed several acclaimed press screenings but censorship fears resulted in further editing on Eva and by the time it was released theatrically, it ran a mere 103 minutes. Needless to say, Losey was terribly disappointed with the final cut (he disowned it) and moved on to The Servant (1963) which was a unanimous success with critics and the film that elevated his status as a director.

Thanks to Kino International, we can finally see an alternate director's cut of Eva (titled Eve in the credits) and the original release version of the film on the same DVD! The director's cut runs 119 minutes and, though shorter than Losey's 140 minute cut, is much closer to his original conception. This version was taken from the only surviving print of a Swedish/Finnish release print that was housed in the British Film Institute. Although the visual quality is often on a par with VHS public domain titles and there are two sets of Scandinavian subtitles, Eve still affords Losey fans the opportunity to view several previously unseen sequences that flesh out Eva and Tyvian's self-destructive relationship. Much more pleasing to the eye is the shorter theatrical release version of Eva which perfectly captures the decadent romantic allure of Venice in silvery, black and white tones. The music score by Michel Legrand is equally striking.

Both Eva and Eve are presented in the 1:85:1 letterboxed format though, as noted, Eve comes with a dual set of on-screen subtitles which are not optional. Otherwise, the disk has no extra features other than an attractive snapcase and the liner notes by Bret Wood.

For more information on Eva>, visit Kino International. To purchase a copy of Eva, visit Movies Unlimited.

By Jeff Stafford

Eva - Eva Or Eve? - Two Versions Of A Joseph Losey Film

Eva - EVA or EVE? - TWO VERSIONS OF A JOSEPH LOSEY FILM

In 1962, after toiling in the British B-movie industry for years, blacklisted director Joseph Losey was finally offered a promising project and a lucrative contract from the producing team of Robert and Raymond Hakim (Belle de Jour, 1967). With a pulp fiction novel by James Hadley Chase as his source material and Venice, Italy during the off season as his setting, Losey created a dark, wintry tale about an obsessive but destructive relationship entitled Eva (1963). Jeanne Moreau plays the title role - a seductress but also a destroyer. Her new victim is Tyvian Jones (Stanley Baker), a renowned Scottish writer who has an adoring fiancee (Virna Lisi) and a promising career ahead of him. But there are major chinks in Jones' self-confident facade. His deep-seated feelings of guilt - over claiming credit for his dead brother's novel and reaping international fame - are beginning to erupt in acts of self-loathing and disgust which are only intensified by his masochistic relationship with the enigmatic Eva. Eva was originally intended as a three hour drama but Losey was forced to cut it down to a two and a half hour running time by his producers. In that form, the film enjoyed several acclaimed press screenings but censorship fears resulted in further editing on Eva and by the time it was released theatrically, it ran a mere 103 minutes. Needless to say, Losey was terribly disappointed with the final cut (he disowned it) and moved on to The Servant (1963) which was a unanimous success with critics and the film that elevated his status as a director. Thanks to Kino International, we can finally see an alternate director's cut of Eva (titled Eve in the credits) and the original release version of the film on the same DVD! The director's cut runs 119 minutes and, though shorter than Losey's 140 minute cut, is much closer to his original conception. This version was taken from the only surviving print of a Swedish/Finnish release print that was housed in the British Film Institute. Although the visual quality is often on a par with VHS public domain titles and there are two sets of Scandinavian subtitles, Eve still affords Losey fans the opportunity to view several previously unseen sequences that flesh out Eva and Tyvian's self-destructive relationship. Much more pleasing to the eye is the shorter theatrical release version of Eva which perfectly captures the decadent romantic allure of Venice in silvery, black and white tones. The music score by Michel Legrand is equally striking. Both Eva and Eve are presented in the 1:85:1 letterboxed format though, as noted, Eve comes with a dual set of on-screen subtitles which are not optional. Otherwise, the disk has no extra features other than an attractive snapcase and the liner notes by Bret Wood. For more information on Eva>, visit Kino International. To purchase a copy of Eva, visit Movies Unlimited. By Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Filmed on location in Venice and Rome. Original running time: 155 min. Opened in Paris in October 1962; running time: 116 min; in Rome in October 1962; running time: 107 min. Originally intended for U. S. release in 1963 as Eve. Also known as Eva (The Devil's Woman).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States Fall October 28, 1964

Released in United States on Video August 30, 2000

Re-released in United States April 14, 2000

Shown at MOMA (Jeanne Moreau: Nouvelle Vague and Beyond) in New York City February 18 - March 25, 1994.

2000 re-release is a full-length, never before seen in the United States, director's cut which adds 20 minutes of previously lost footage taken from the only existing complete negative of the film.

Joseph Losey has a bit part in the film.

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at MOMA (Jeanne Moreau: Nouvelle Vague and Beyond) in New York City February 18 - March 25, 1994.)

Re-released in United States April 14, 2000 (director's cut; Film Forum; New York City)

Released in United States on Video August 30, 2000

Released in United States Fall October 28, 1964