Escape to Witch Mountain


1h 37m 1975
Escape to Witch Mountain

Brief Synopsis

An unscrupulous millionaire tries to catch two mysterious children with super powers.

Film Details

Also Known As
montagne ensorcelée
MPAA Rating
Genre
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1

Synopsis

Psychic twins seek their origin while running from an evil tycoon who wants to use them.

Film Details

Also Known As
montagne ensorcelée
MPAA Rating
Genre
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1

Articles

Escape to Witch Mountain


Escape to Witch Mountain became one of Disney's most popular live-action films ever when it was released in 1975. Based on the much-loved story by Alexander Key, the film continues to act as a rich introduction to science fiction for kids and nostalgic entertainment for adults. Starring Kim Richards and Ike Eisenmann as Tia and Tony Malone, the film follows the flight of two orphaned children with extraterrestrial powers from the powerful millionaire Aristotle Bolt (Ray Milland) and his lackey Lucas Deranian (Donald Pleasence) – men who want to use the children's powers to nefarious ends. Tony and Tia aren't sure where they're running to, except for the map they discover in Tia's box, emblazoned with double suns, and the memories of a watery crash -- snippets of recall that pronounce themselves as the two move closer to Witch Mountain and the salvation that seems to await them there. Befriended by the widowed and bitter RV enthusiast Jason O'Day (Eddie Albert), who is moved by the children's' plight, Tony and Tia will eventually reach the place of a predestined rendezvous and discover where they really come from.

Richards was already an established child actor at the time Escape to Witch Mountain was released, having made many commercials and television appearances, in addition to 54 episodes of Nanny and the Professor (1970). She followed Escape to Witch Mountain with No Deposit, No Return (1976) and Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), in which her character meets a shocking end. Her younger sister, Kyle Richards, makes an appearance in Escape to Witch Mountain, portraying the younger Tia. Their half-sister, Kathy, went on to gain a different kind of notoriety as a Hilton and mother of Paris and Nicki.

Ike Eisenmann, now known as Lake Eisenmann, moved behind the camera in 1987 after a rich television career. He works as a sound technician and directs and produces animated projects.

Director John Hough (The Legend of Hell House, 1973) was well-versed in horror and suspense when he took on Escape to Witch Mountain, beginning in the UK as assistant director on The Avengers (1961). He returned, as did Richards and Eisenmann, for Return from Witch Mountain (1978).

That television staple of the '70s and '80s Denver Pyle (Dukes of Hazard, 1979) plays Uncle Bené, who has been looking for Tony and Tia since their spaceship crash-landed. And '70s teen star Lance Kerwin (James at 15, 1977), makes a short appearance in the film as one of Tony and Tia's fellow orphans, as does a young actor named Dermott Downs, who was often misidentified afterwards as another red-headed child star by the name of Johnny Whitaker.

The distinctive score for the movie was written by Johnny Mendel, who also composed the music for the film and television versions of MASH.

Escape to Witch Mountain was remade in 1995 and another version is due to be released in 2009, titled Race to Witch Mountain, in which Richards and Eisenmann will both make appearances.

Producer: Jerome Courtland
Director: John Hough
Screenplay: Robert Malcolm Young; Alexander Key (book)
Cinematography: Frank Phillips
Art Direction: John B. Mansbridge, Al Roelofs
Music: Johnny Mandel
Film Editing: Robert Stafford
Cast: Eddie Albert (Jason O'Day), Ray Milland (Aristotle Bolt), Donald Pleasence (Lucas Deranian), Kim Richards (Tia Malone), Ike Eisenmann (Tony Malone), Walter Barnes (Sheriff Purdy), Reta Shaw (Mrs. Grindley), Denver Pyle (Uncle Bene), Alfred Ryder (Astrologer), Lawrence Montaigne (Ubermann), Terry Wilson (Biff Jenkins).
C-98m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Emily Soares
Escape To Witch Mountain

Escape to Witch Mountain

Escape to Witch Mountain became one of Disney's most popular live-action films ever when it was released in 1975. Based on the much-loved story by Alexander Key, the film continues to act as a rich introduction to science fiction for kids and nostalgic entertainment for adults. Starring Kim Richards and Ike Eisenmann as Tia and Tony Malone, the film follows the flight of two orphaned children with extraterrestrial powers from the powerful millionaire Aristotle Bolt (Ray Milland) and his lackey Lucas Deranian (Donald Pleasence) – men who want to use the children's powers to nefarious ends. Tony and Tia aren't sure where they're running to, except for the map they discover in Tia's box, emblazoned with double suns, and the memories of a watery crash -- snippets of recall that pronounce themselves as the two move closer to Witch Mountain and the salvation that seems to await them there. Befriended by the widowed and bitter RV enthusiast Jason O'Day (Eddie Albert), who is moved by the children's' plight, Tony and Tia will eventually reach the place of a predestined rendezvous and discover where they really come from. Richards was already an established child actor at the time Escape to Witch Mountain was released, having made many commercials and television appearances, in addition to 54 episodes of Nanny and the Professor (1970). She followed Escape to Witch Mountain with No Deposit, No Return (1976) and Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), in which her character meets a shocking end. Her younger sister, Kyle Richards, makes an appearance in Escape to Witch Mountain, portraying the younger Tia. Their half-sister, Kathy, went on to gain a different kind of notoriety as a Hilton and mother of Paris and Nicki. Ike Eisenmann, now known as Lake Eisenmann, moved behind the camera in 1987 after a rich television career. He works as a sound technician and directs and produces animated projects. Director John Hough (The Legend of Hell House, 1973) was well-versed in horror and suspense when he took on Escape to Witch Mountain, beginning in the UK as assistant director on The Avengers (1961). He returned, as did Richards and Eisenmann, for Return from Witch Mountain (1978). That television staple of the '70s and '80s Denver Pyle (Dukes of Hazard, 1979) plays Uncle Bené, who has been looking for Tony and Tia since their spaceship crash-landed. And '70s teen star Lance Kerwin (James at 15, 1977), makes a short appearance in the film as one of Tony and Tia's fellow orphans, as does a young actor named Dermott Downs, who was often misidentified afterwards as another red-headed child star by the name of Johnny Whitaker. The distinctive score for the movie was written by Johnny Mendel, who also composed the music for the film and television versions of MASH. Escape to Witch Mountain was remade in 1995 and another version is due to be released in 2009, titled Race to Witch Mountain, in which Richards and Eisenmann will both make appearances. Producer: Jerome Courtland Director: John Hough Screenplay: Robert Malcolm Young; Alexander Key (book) Cinematography: Frank Phillips Art Direction: John B. Mansbridge, Al Roelofs Music: Johnny Mandel Film Editing: Robert Stafford Cast: Eddie Albert (Jason O'Day), Ray Milland (Aristotle Bolt), Donald Pleasence (Lucas Deranian), Kim Richards (Tia Malone), Ike Eisenmann (Tony Malone), Walter Barnes (Sheriff Purdy), Reta Shaw (Mrs. Grindley), Denver Pyle (Uncle Bene), Alfred Ryder (Astrologer), Lawrence Montaigne (Ubermann), Terry Wilson (Biff Jenkins). C-98m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Emily Soares

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)


Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99.

The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941).

His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956).

As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace.

After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78).

The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99. The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956). As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace. After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78). The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1975

Released in USA on video as part of Walt Disney's Family Film Collection.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1975