Les Misérables


1h 48m 1935
Les Misérables

Brief Synopsis

An obsessed policeman relentlessly pursues an escaped convict.

Film Details

Also Known As
Victor Hugo's Les Misérables
Genre
Drama
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1935
Production Company
Darryl Zanuck
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (Paris, 1862).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

An obsessed policeman relentlessly pursues an escaped convict.

Cast

Fredric March

Jean Valjean/Champmathieu

Charles Laughton

[Emile] Javert

Sir Cedric Hardwicke

Bishop Bienvenue

Rochelle Hudson

Cosette

Frances Drake

Eponine

John Beal

Marius

Florence Eldridge

Fantine

Jessie Ralph

Mme. Magloire

Mary Forbes

Mlle. Baptiseme

Florence Roberts

Toussaint

Jane Kerr

Mme. Thenardier

Ferdinand Gottschalk

Thenardier

Charles Haefeli

Brevet

Marilynne Knowlden

Little Cosette

John Bleifer

Chenildieu

Leonid Kinskey

Genflou

Harry Semels

Cochepaille

Eily Malyon

Mother Superior

Ian Maclaren

Head gardener

Vernon Downing

Brissac

Lyons Wickland

Lamarque

John Carradine

Enjolras

Lorin Raker

Valsin

Perry Ivins

M. Devereux

Thomas Mills

L'Estrange

Lowell Drew

Duval

Davidson Clark

Marcin

Pat Somerset

François

Herbert Bunston

Judge at Favorelles

Keith Kenneth

Senior Prefect

G. Raymond "bill" Nye

Jacques

Robert Greig

Prison governor

Virginia Howell

Old beggarwoman

Perry N. Vekroff

Clerk in Favorelles

Harry Cording

Beam warder

Edward Cooper

Prison clerk

Jacques Lory

Prison clerk

Paul Irving

Innkeeper

Roger Gray

Gendarme at inn

Alden Chase

1st gendarme at Bishop's home

Claude Payton

2d gendarme at Bishop's home

Ethan Laidlaw

3d gendarme at Bishop's home

Montague Shaw

Factory foreman

Margaret Bloodgood

Factory forewoman

Sidney Bracy

Mayor's clerk

Christian J. Frank

1st gendarme investigator

Eric Wilton

2d gendarme investigator

Murdock Macquarrie

Fauchelevant

Billie Orlean

Peasant child

Jean Marion

Peasant child

E. Midge Ingleton

Peasant woman on road

Emma Tansey

Peasant woman on road

Nick Shaid

Old beggar on road

Joseph De Stefani

Usher in Arras courtroom/Old clerk in Arras

George Barraud

Prosecutor

Gunnis Davis

Defense consul in Arras

William P. Carleton

1st judge in Arras

Anders Van Haden

2d judge in Arras

John Ince

3d judge in Arras

Gertrude W. Hoffman

Nurse in hospital

Mary Maclaren

2d nurse in hospital

Cliff Smith

Javert's aide in chase

G. Raymond "bill" Nye

Javert's aide in chase

Paul Palmer

Javert's aide in chase

Frank Mccarroll

Javert's aide in chase

Cecil Weston

Lodging housekeeper

Bradley Ward

Plainclothesman in Bois

Olaf Hytten

Pierre

Cecile Elliott

Concierge

Al Ferguson

Gendarme in chase on street

George Guhl

Onlooker on street

Gerald Rogers

Onlooker on street

Wilfred Lucas

Onlooker on street

Leonard Mudie

Priest

George Macquarrie

Frenchman at door

Reginald Barlow

Henri on street

Monte Van Der Grift

Gendarme on street

Robert L. Stevenson

Drunk at inn

Heinie Conklin

Drunk at inn

Herbert Ashley

Drunk at inn

J. P. Mcgowan

Javert's plainclothesman

Cyril Thornton

Javert's plainclothesman

Pietro Sosso

Jean's valet

Lillian West

Jean's servant

Kathleen Chambers

Jean's servant

Frank Hagney

Prisoner in galley

Albert Prisco

Prisoner in galley

Robert Wilber

Prisoner in galley

Sam Baker

Black convict

Everett Brown

Black convict

Olin Francis

Whip warder in galley

Frederick Peters

Whip warder in galley

Leo Sulky

Whip warder in galley

Philo Mccollough

Whip warder in galley

Bud Fine

Cook/Fight warder in galley

Leo Willis

Cook/Fight warder in galley

Harry Wilson

Cook/Fight warder in galley

T. C. Jacks

Cook/Fight warder in galley

Art Miles

Blacksmith warder and gendarme in prefect's office

Dave Dunbar

Gendarme in prefect's office

Stan Blystone

Gendarme in prefect's office

Bob St. Angelo

Gendarme in prefect's office

Ray Burgess

Gendarme in prefect's office

Leon Beaumont

Gendarme in prefect's office

Lew Hicks

Gendarme in prefect's office

Al Ferguson

Gendarme in prefect's office

Jack Curtis

Gendarme in prefect's office

John Northpole

Gendarme in prefect's office

Raul Figarola

Lawyer in 1st court

Billy Elmer

Lawyer in 1st court

Kai Schmidt

Lawyer in 1st court

Harry Webberly

Lawyer in 1st court

Francis Powers

Lawyer in 1st court

Joe Rickson

Gendarme in 1st court

Hercules Mendez

Gendarme in 1st court

Cyril Thornton

Gendarme in 1st court

Tony Merlo

Gendarme in 1st court

Elmer Pallard

Clerk in 1st court

Arthur Evers

Clerk in 1st court

Walter Stegmeier

Carpenter warder in galley

Phillip Cash

Carpenter warder in galley

J. J. Lentz

Carpenter warder in galley

Maxine Cook

Thernardier's child

Roberta Mountjoy

Thernardier's child

Skipper Zeliff

Videos

Movie Clip

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Victor Hugo's Les Misérables
Genre
Drama
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1935
Production Company
Darryl Zanuck
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (Paris, 1862).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Award Nominations

Best Assistant Director

1935

Best Cinematography

1935

Best Film Editing

1935

Best Picture

1935

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

In the opening credits, this film is introduced as "Victor Hugo's Les Misérables." After the opening credits, the film includes the following quote from Victor Hugo: "So long as there exists in this world that we call civilized, a system whereby men and women, even after they have paid the penalty of the law and expiated their offenses in full, are hounded and persecuted wherever they go-this story will not have been told in vain." In detailed conference notes regarding the screenplay, in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, studio head Darryl Zanuck is quoted concerning his views of the story: "The romance between Jean Valjean and Cosette is the most important element of the story and should be developed. His feeling for her when he first takes her is one of attachment. This later develops into devotion and culminates in her being his life blood. By treating it this way, the scene where he finally gives her up will absolutely slaughter audiences. This treatment will strike a human note in the picture and make it something much more important than just a finely conceived melodrama."
       Director Richard Boleslawski and screenwriter W. P. Lipscomb also wrote and directed an earlier 20th Century Pictures historical epic, Clive of India. Sir Cedric Hardwicke was knighted the previous year by King George V for his work on the English stage. According to a review, 200 inmates of the Midnight Mission in Los Angeles were given roles as prisoners in the film for ten dollars a day for a week; Fredric March used nine different makeups; the film cost almost $1,000,000 to make; March and Charles Laughton were each paid $100,000, and Rochelle Hudson was borrowed from Fox. According to news items, the film was shot in thirty-four days, and Zanuck attended the New York premiere. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Picture, Cinematography (Gregg Toland), Film Editing (Barbara McLean) and Assistant Director (Eric Stacey). It was fifth on the list of 10 Best Pictures of 1935 in the Film Daily Nation Wide Poll of Critics of America, rated an "Honorable Mention" by the National Board of Review and was fifth on the list of New York Times reviewer Andre Sennwald's ten best films of the first six months of 1935. Other film versions of the novel include a four-part series produced by Vitagraph in 1909; a 1917 Fox Film Corp. production directed by Frank Lloyd and starring William Farnum (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.2961); a 1934 French production starring Harry Baur and Charles Vanel and directed by Raymond Bernard; a 1947 Italian film entitled I Miserablili, starring Gino Cervi and Valentina Cortese and directed by Riccardo Freda; a 1950 Japanese production starring Sessue Hayakawa and directed by Daisuke Ito and Masahiro Makino; a 1952 Twentieth Century-Fox production starring Michael Rennie and Robert Newton and directed by Lewis Milestone; a 1958 French/Italian co-production starring Jean Gabin and Bernard Blier and directed by Jean Paul Le Chanois; a 1978 Norman Rosemont Production made for television starring Richard Jordan and Anthony Perkins and directed by Glenn Jordan; and a 1982 French production starring Lino Ventura and directed by Robert Hossein. A musical based on the novel, with French text by Alain Boubil and Jean-Marc Natel, additional material by James Fenton, and music by Claude-Michel Schönberg, opened in Paris in 1980. The American version of the musical, with lyrics by Boubil, Herbert Kretzmer, Jean-Marc Natel, Trevor Nunn and John Caird, had its premiere in Washington, D.C. on December 20, 1986.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1935

Released in United States March 1977

Released in United States on Video January 21, 1988

Released in United States 1935

Released in United States on Video January 21, 1988

Released in United States March 1977 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Treasures from UCLA Archives) March 9-27, 1977.)