Eighteen and Anxious


1h 33m 1957

Film Details

Also Known As
No Greater Sin, Young Mother
Release Date
Nov 15, 1957
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 11 Nov 1957
Production Company
AB-PT Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Las Vegas--Dunes Hotel, Nevada, United States; Los Vegas--Dunes Hotel, Nevada, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

In Southern California, eighteen-year-old Judy Graham has secretly married fellow high school student Jack Bayne, who is waiting for "the right psychological moment" to tell his wealthy parents about their elopement to Tijuana. When Jack, an amateur racecar driver, is killed during a competition, Judy is forced to grieve in secret. Her friends, unaware that she was in a relationship with Jack, think her sadness at his death is overdone and urge her to accompany them to a rock and roll dance event at a Hollywood diner. There she is noticed by a young disk jockey, Danny Fuller, but she faints and must leave early. Concerned for her health, her worldly friend, twenty-one-year-old Ava Norton, takes Judy to a doctor, where she learns she is pregnant. Fearing the reaction of her mother Lottie and her overbearing stepfather Harvey, Judy tries telling Jack's parents, but they refuse to believe that their son married her. Mr. Bayne, deceiving himself, brags that Jack had always planned to go to West Point and accuses her of having loose morals. To gain proof of the marriage, Judy and Ava go to Tijuana to get a copy of the license, but the clerk claims to have no record for the surname "Bayne." Frantic, Judy considers abortion, but when she and Ava meet with a sleazy doctor who tells her to think of the operation as removing a "blemish," Judy backs out. As she gains weight, the domineering Harvey guesses Judy's condition. Already resentful of bearing the cost of rearing a teenager, he calls her a "tramp." Fearing damage to his reputation as an insurance salesman, he sends Judy away to have the baby. The weak-willed Lottie, who suffers from vague, chronic health problems and Harvey's bullying, gives her daughter support and, claiming illness, does not attend Judy's childbirth. Judy, refusing to look at her newborn son, orders the infant to be taken away, contrary to the advice of the hospital manager, Mrs. Warren, who later confides that she never knew who her own parents were. Of her family and friends, only Ava helps Judy and invites her to share an apartment. She gets Judy a job as a waitress at the Hollywood diner, where Judy again meets Danny and begins to date him. Meanwhile, without Judy's knowledge, Lottie repents neglecting her daughter and decides, against Harvey's will, to take the baby. On a date with Danny, Judy meets Pete Bailey, a singer and trumpeter with whom Danny is pitching an idea for a record album. Although the flirtatious Pete behaves boorishly, Judy takes an interest in him, because she feels down-trodden and admires him as someone whom "no one pushes around." Danny is in love with Judy and goes to her apartment to warn her that Pete, a womanizer, is "bad news." While Danny is visiting, Lottie arrives with the baby, whom she introduces as "Butch," her adopted son. After Danny departs, Lottie tells Judy that she plans to leave Harvey and wants to make a home for Judy and Butch. Warming to the idea, Judy urges her to act immediately, but Lottie loses her resolve, saying that she must wait for the "right time." Having heard that line before, Judy doubts Lottie's sincerity. Later, at a party honoring of the "premiere" of his album, Pete gets Judy drunk. Danny arrives late, after a meeting in which he has been offered a job as television show host. For her own good, Danny tries to get her away from the lecherous Pete, but she stubbornly refuses to give him up, because she wants to be connected to someone important. Without being told Judy's story, Danny has guessed that Butch is her child, but assumes that the father deserted her. When he suggests that she is using Pete to get even with the child's father, Judy, offended that no one believes that she and Jack were in love, orders him away. She and Pete begin dating, but Judy refuses to grant him sexual favors, as she is holding out for marriage. When the Baynes find Jack and Judy's marriage license among his belongings, which erroneously states their surname as "Payne," they realize that Judy was telling the truth and their attitude toward her changes. The Baynes meet with Lottie and Harvey, and offer to take over the care of the child. Hoping that he can sell the Baynes insurance and a trust fund, Harvey behaves like a loving father. That a "piece of paper" has the power to change her elders' attitudes angers Judy and she bristles at their hypocrisy. Confronting them, she announces that she wants to rear the baby, but they accuse her of abandoning him. Only Lottie supports Judy and apologizes, hoping that she is not too late to help her. Soon after, Pete is offered a performing job in Las Vegas. Wanting Judy to accompany him, he pretends that he will marry her there. Ava, who is attracted to Danny, tells him about the marriage license. Although she believes Judy has made up the whole story to save face, Danny believes it and drives to Las Vegas to try to win her back. In Las Vegas, entertainment manager Harold "Eager" Beaver urges Pete to drop Judy, claiming that he cannot "sell" Pete to female audiences if the public knows that he is not available. At Eager's suggestion, Pete buys Judy an expensive car, but lets her believe that it is a wedding present. After drinking and romancing, Judy wakes up the next morning, believing it to be her wedding day, but Pete explains that he cannot marry her. Later, Eager thanks Judy for being a "good sport," explaining how Pete would lose his "appeal" if he marries. Realizing that she has been played the fool, Judy goes to her hotel room and drinks. Upon finding her there, disillusioned and without hope, Danny chases Pete around the hotel, beating him up for mistreating Judy. Upset, Judy races off to the desert in her new car, oblivious to everything around her. Haunted by memories, she drives on the wrong side of the road and crashes into an oncoming vehicle. Her car then overturns and catches fire. When Danny, who has followed, rescues her, she admits that she wanted to die. As Danny carries her away from the burning car, he says, "Everyone has a lot to make up to you."

Film Details

Also Known As
No Greater Sin, Young Mother
Release Date
Nov 15, 1957
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 11 Nov 1957
Production Company
AB-PT Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Las Vegas--Dunes Hotel, Nevada, United States; Los Vegas--Dunes Hotel, Nevada, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Articles

Martha Scott, 1914-2003


Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88.

Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery.

She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade.

Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88. Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery. She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade. Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of the film were Young Mother and No Greater Sin. Actor Damian O'Flynn's first name was misspelled "Damien" in the opening credits. The screenwriting team, who were listed as "Katherine and Dale Eunson" in the opening credits, were married. Actress Jackie Loughery, who portrayed "Ava Norton" in the film, was Miss America of 1952 and the third wife of actor-director-producer Jack Webb of Dragnet fame. Mike Wallace, then an ABC-TV interview personality, who would later be one of the original anchormen on CBS television's 60 Minutes, recorded a thirty-second radio spot recommending the film. Eighteen and Anxious marked the motion picture debut of Connie Stevens, although her first film role was in Young and Dangerous, which was made just prior to Eighteen and Anxious but released later.
       A May 1957 Hollywood Reporter news item reported that John Barrymore, Jr. was cast in a lead role; however, he does not appear in the final film. Although their appearance in the film has not been confirmed, a July 1, 1957 Hollywood Reporter news item adds Fred Fisher, Pat Dean and Billy Snyder to the cast. According to a May 1957 Hollywood Reporter news item, portions of the film were shot at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas, NV.
       The Motion Picture Herald review described the film as "crude and unsuitable for the majority of the impressionable teenagers for which it was primarily designed." However, other reviews differed, such as Hollywood Reporter, which reported the story as "a tasteful and honest attempt to deal with the problems of teenagers." New York Times stated that the story was a "surprisingly decent and absorbing case history that rings true," despite its title, which to the reviewer sounded like "trash." The LA Mirror announced that the film was better "than its sleazy titled indicates" and went on to say, "The subject matter [about] the troubles of a pregnant girl who can't get anyone to believe she was secretly married seem almost wholesome in view of the recent rash of stories about teen-age murders and dope addicts."
       The suggestiveness of the film's title was carried over into the studio's publicity campaign, which was geared toward teenagers. One tagline advertised, "Parents will be shocked but...youth will understand." Other taglines provided by the studio were "Over 35? Feeling low? Eighteen and Anxious...guaranteed to revitalize you" and "Old enough to be a mother...Too young to be married."

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 1957

Released in United States Fall November 1957