Eight Bells


1h 9m 1935

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 11, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Eight Bells by Percy G. Mandley (New York, 28 Oct 1933) and the novel Eight Bells by Percy G. Mandley (New York, 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Steamship line owner Walker, hoping to receive a five-year contract with a Chinese railroad, agrees to deliver a cargo to Shanghai, although the penalty for being late will be five thousand dollars for each day over schedule. Meanwhile, Walker's fiery daughter Marge becomes engaged to Roy Dale, the first mate of their biggest passenger ship. Although seretly pleased, Walker knows that the rebellious Marge needs to be put in her place, so he sends Roy with the cargo to China. Aboard the freighter Combermere , Roy takes over from Captain Steve Andrews, who becomes chief officer. To be with Roy, Marge stows away on the ship, together with her Aunt Susan. Steve finds them, and does little to hide his contempt for the imperious stowaways. Roy, who is unfamiliar with freighters, and also a poor seaman, orders a course through a dangerous storm area, despite Steve's warning. When the ship is hit by a hurricane, the radio operator is killed by debris, and Roy becomes so fearful that Steve is forced to take over. As the vessel begins to sink, Roy urges Steve to save the women, and places them, along with himself and two sailors, into the lifeboat. Overhearing the plan, the crew mutiny and demand that lots be drawn to see who will go in the small lifeboat, which can only hold ten people. Steve refuses to participate, and Marge and her aunt, unhappy with Roy, side with Steve. They influence the crew to remain aboard and keep the ship afloat. Days later, the Combermere arrives in Shanghai on schedule. Roy frees Marge from their engagement, as she is now in love with Steve, who happily agrees to marry her.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 11, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Eight Bells by Percy G. Mandley (New York, 28 Oct 1933) and the novel Eight Bells by Percy G. Mandley (New York, 1934).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Articles

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern


Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.
Tcm Remembers - Ann Sothern

TCM Remembers - Ann Sothern

Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Actor John Buckler also portrayed Roy Dale in the Broadway production of the play.