Dudes


1h 37m 1987
Dudes

Brief Synopsis

A couple of punks from the big city go on a cross country road trip out west and take revenge against a group of rednecks.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Western
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
New Century/Vista Film Company
Location
New Mexico, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Jerome, Arizona, USA; Utah, USA; Cottonwood, Arizona, USA; Flagstaff, Arizona, USA; Sedona, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Milo, Grant, and Biscuit, three punk kids from New York City, decide to go to Hollywood, traveling across the country in their Volkswagen bug. While they are stopped in Utah for the night, Milo is murdered by a gang wandering through the West on a killing spree. Grant and Biscuit temporarily postpone their trip to avenge the death of their friend.

Crew

Gary Anderson

Song

Brian Armstrong

Assistant Camera Operator

Bengt Aronsson

Song

Kat Arthur

Song

Anne Aulenta

Hair

Nina Axelrod

Casting

Rick Barker

Stunts

Ray Benson

Song

Bernie Bernstein

Song

Charles Bernstein

Music

Ray Berwick

Animal Trainer

Levon Besnelian

Grip

Sylvie Bourin

Music Supervisor

Dan Bradley

Stunt Coordinator

Dan Bradley

Stunts

Dennis Brookins

Negative Cutting

Vincent M Bruno

Property Master Assistant

Patrick Cassidy

Swing Gang

Lori Chapman

Assistant

Peter Chesney

Special Effects Coordinator

Nick Cline

Electrician

Michael Cocks

Song

Simon Coke

Sound Editor

Kathy Coleman

Music Coordinator

Eric Collins

Location Manager

Kevin Connors

Grip

Mike Connors

Grip

Scott Cook

Stunts

Charlie Croughwell

Stunts

Eric Dare

Casting Associate

Lisa Dean

Assistant Art Director

Dennis Diltz

Sound Editor

Lee Dragu

Associate Editor

Mort Engelberg

Executive Producer

Jon Epstein

Stunts

Joseph Escalante

Stunts

Gary Farr

Photography

Perry Farrell

Theme Lyrics

Wesley Ferrier

Song

Star Fields

Construction Coordinator

Glory Fioramonti

Stunts

Elizabeth Flaherty

On-Set Dresser

Kim Fowler-esser

Foley Artist

John Fruin

Grip

Matt Gatson

Post-Production Accountant

Christine Gerhardt

Makeup Assistant

Christine Gerhardt

Hair Assistant

Pat Gerhardt

Hair Assistant

Pat Gerhardt

Makeup Assistant

Joe Gilbride

Stunts

James Gilliam

Stunts

Jennifer Goldsmith

Accounting Assistant

Debra Goldstein

Other

Ted J Gomillion

Foley

Robert Gordon

Song Performer

Phil Gorth

Color

Mark J Greenberg

Production Auditor

Richard H Greever

Transportation Captain

Billy Hall

Production Assistant

Mindy Hall

Hair Assistant

Mindy Hall

Makeup Assistant

Brian Hansen

Song

Marguerite Happy

Stunts

Bruce Hayes

Special Effects

Duane Hensel

Foley Artist

Doug Hiserodt

Swing Gang

Jonathan Hodges

On-Set Dresser

Dennis Hollis

Transportation Captain

Marin Brooke Hopper

Post-Production Assistant

Andy Horvitch

Editor

Kevin Hughes

Property Master

Herb Jaffe

Producer

Randall Jahnson

Screenplay

Randall Johnson

Screenplay

Al Jones

Stunts

Kevin Kelley

Lighting Technician

Bill Kirkpatrick

Assistant

Frank Kostenko

Other

Janet Kusnick

Visual Effects

Tip Landay

Craft Service

Larry Larson

Caterer

Blackie Lawless

Song

Don Leady

Song

Celeste Lee

Set Decorator

Donald Likovich

Assistant Editor

Chris Lombardi

Assistant Camera Operator

Guy J Louthan

Assistant Director

Chalmer Lumary

Stunts

Ray Lykins

Stunts

Christopher Lyons

Electrician

Don Macdougall

Sound

John Mack

Sound

Gar Macrae

Sound

Susan Malerstein-watkins

Script Supervisor

Zen Mansley

Sound Editor

Vera M Martin

Production Coordinator

Walt Martin

Sound Mixer

Charles W Mccann

Sound Editor

Steve Mccroskey

Music Editor

Tim Mcginnis

Electrician

Frank Mckelvy

Sound Editor

Jeff Meyer

Wrangler

Mike Milliken

Color Timer

Tim Minear

Production Assistant

Justin Mitchell

Stunts

Taime Molvik

Song

Robert Montgomery

Other

Kathy Nelson

Music Supervisor

Scott Nesselrode

Special Effects Assistant

David W Nims

Best Boy

Valli O'reilly

Makeup

Jill Ohanneson

Costume Designer

Roger Olkowski

Lighting Technician

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Carl Perkins

Song

Denney Pierce

Stunts

Patti Pritchard

Photography

Dan Quackenbush

Stunts

Yasmin Qureshi

Other

Pinki Ragan

Location Manager

Brian Reinhardt

Craft Service

Marc Reshovsky

Director Of Photography

Robert Richardson

Director Of Photography

Todd Roberts

Costumes

Daniel Lane Root

Stunts

Kerry Rossall

Stunts

Jan Sakert

Music

John R Savka

Key Grip

John Scherer

Assistant Director

Anna Schoeller

Other

Derek Scott

Assistant Camera Operator

Charlie Sexton

Song

John Sherrod

Stunts

Jonathan Smart

Art Assistant

Stephen E Smith

Music

Perri Sorel

Hair Assistant

Perri Sorel

Makeup Assistant

Catherine M Speakman

Sound Editor

Chris Spedding

Song Performer

Anthony Starbuck

Boom Operator

Simon Steele

Song

Sting

Song

Ned Sublette

Song

Ned Sublette

Song Performer

Michael Sullivan

Pyrotechnics

Michael Sullivan

Pyrotechnics

Rob Sweeney

Assistant Camera Operator

James C. Taylor

Transportation Coordinator

Miguel Tejada-flores

Producer

Leland R Thomas

Sound Editor

John Thum

Song

Sammy Thurman

Stunts

Ernest Tubb

Song Performer

Talmadge Tubb

Song

Dick Tyler Sr.

Sound

Steve Vai

Song Performer

Gore Verbinski

Song

Gene Walker

Stunts

Earl Watson

Sound Editor

Bob Weitz

Consultant

Peter Wells

Song

Tim Wick

Production Assistant

Chris Wilding

Assistant Editor

Chuck Williams

Assistant Director

Howard Winer

Assistant Director

Gordon Wolf

Line Producer

Bob Ziembicki

Production Designer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adventure
Western
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
New Century/Vista Film Company
Location
New Mexico, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Jerome, Arizona, USA; Utah, USA; Cottonwood, Arizona, USA; Flagstaff, Arizona, USA; Sedona, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Dudes


It's probably safe to say that very few filmmakers have a more diverse or playful filmography than Penelope Spheeris. A music video pioneer with an uncanny knack of finding the pulse of the burgeoning music scene in one decade after another, she burst onto the feature film scene in 1979 with the groundbreaking punk rock documentary, The Decline of Western Civilization (1981), which she followed with a flamboyant heavy metal-themed sequel in 1988 and a lesser seen third one in 1998. In cinematic pop culture terms she's best known for performing the remarkable task of turning a plotless Saturday Night Live skit into the blockbuster Wayne's World (1992), which led to a handful of lesser comedies throughout the '90s.

However, Spheeris also served as a chronicler of the American youth experience in narrative films in the 1980s with a trio of cult films about disaffected youth involved in varying levels of criminal behavior: Suburbia (1983), a Roger Corman-produced look at punk-loved kids left to their own devices in the middle class; The Boys Next Door (1985), a crime spree thriller about two high school grads gone very bad; and the lightest and most bizarre of the trilogy, Dudes (1987), starring Jon Cryer, Daniel Roebuck, and Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea. Dudes was the brainchild of writer Randall Jahnson (credited as "J. Randal Johnson"), a current screenwriting teacher who parlayed this, his first produced script, into writing such films as The Doors (1991) and The Mask of Zorro (1998), as well as two episodes of TV's Tales from the Crypt. "The dialogue was very realistic and true to contemporary kids' thinking," Spheeris said during promotional interviews for the film. "I know a lot about that because of the other films that I've done, and that's why I responded to it." Cryer was equally enthusiastic about the project, noting, "It's too bad they don't make very many westerns anymore because it's a lot of fun. I learned how to horseback ride and do chase scenes and got to shoot at people and get shot at. In movies, you always think 'He didn't even wince when he got shot,' but it takes a long time to set that stuff up! When those things blow off, they hurt! So you aren't automatically thinking about your performance. I only got shot once; I felt really sorry for people who had to get shot more times."

Once again drawing on the punk rock scene as the natural habitat of the three central friends in the film, Dudes plunges them into the world of the wild American West when they have a tragic run-in with some violent rednecks. What ensues is both comical, action-packed, and fueled by Spheeris' love of music, with a soundtrack including such disparate acts as Megadeth, W.A.S.P., The Vandals, Steve Vai, and Jane's Addiction.

Though best known today as the star of TV's Two and a Half Men, Cryer will always hold a place in the '80s movie firmament as Ducky in Pretty in Pink (1986). That breakthrough role led to his casting in a rapid succession of films, including the troubled Superman IV: The Quest for Peace and Hiding Out (both 1987) and a comedic pairing with his most famous future co-star, Charlie Sheen, in Hot Shots! (1991). Still a busy actor as well, Roebuck, most recently seen in the series The Man in the High Castle, was cast on the strength of his performance in River's Edge (1986), and remains known today primarily for his TV roles, with the exception of a significant support appearance in The Fugitive (1993).

Almost impossible to market outside of the midnight movie crowd, Dudes can lay claim as the decade's only rockabilly punk western survival thriller comedy. You can trace its cinematic DNA back a bit with such counterculture oddities as Zachariah (1971), but the end result is unlike anything else out there and could have been sold successfully as a cult film in the making. Almost every fan of Dudes had to encounter it through its belated VHS release in the early 1990s, as it received only a handful of token theatrical screenings from distributor The Vista Organization (also known as New Century Vista Film Company). Very short-lived and financially troubled, the company started off strong with such films as The Stepfather, The Gate, and The Wraith in 1987, but it soon floundered with a string of misfires and ended up closing shop in 1989 after botching the releases of such sure things as Fright Night Part 2 and Lady in White in 1988. Dudes was actually one of two Cryer films released by Vista in 1987 along with another cable TV and VHS favorite, Morgan Stewart's Coming Home. Unfortunately Dudes befell the same fate as Spheeris's Western Civilization trilogy and remained out of public sight for decades on home video and television, but its return to the public is a cause for celebration as it allows people to enjoy a key entry in the career of a truly unique and fearless American filmmaker.

By Nathaniel Thompson
Dudes

Dudes

It's probably safe to say that very few filmmakers have a more diverse or playful filmography than Penelope Spheeris. A music video pioneer with an uncanny knack of finding the pulse of the burgeoning music scene in one decade after another, she burst onto the feature film scene in 1979 with the groundbreaking punk rock documentary, The Decline of Western Civilization (1981), which she followed with a flamboyant heavy metal-themed sequel in 1988 and a lesser seen third one in 1998. In cinematic pop culture terms she's best known for performing the remarkable task of turning a plotless Saturday Night Live skit into the blockbuster Wayne's World (1992), which led to a handful of lesser comedies throughout the '90s. However, Spheeris also served as a chronicler of the American youth experience in narrative films in the 1980s with a trio of cult films about disaffected youth involved in varying levels of criminal behavior: Suburbia (1983), a Roger Corman-produced look at punk-loved kids left to their own devices in the middle class; The Boys Next Door (1985), a crime spree thriller about two high school grads gone very bad; and the lightest and most bizarre of the trilogy, Dudes (1987), starring Jon Cryer, Daniel Roebuck, and Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea. Dudes was the brainchild of writer Randall Jahnson (credited as "J. Randal Johnson"), a current screenwriting teacher who parlayed this, his first produced script, into writing such films as The Doors (1991) and The Mask of Zorro (1998), as well as two episodes of TV's Tales from the Crypt. "The dialogue was very realistic and true to contemporary kids' thinking," Spheeris said during promotional interviews for the film. "I know a lot about that because of the other films that I've done, and that's why I responded to it." Cryer was equally enthusiastic about the project, noting, "It's too bad they don't make very many westerns anymore because it's a lot of fun. I learned how to horseback ride and do chase scenes and got to shoot at people and get shot at. In movies, you always think 'He didn't even wince when he got shot,' but it takes a long time to set that stuff up! When those things blow off, they hurt! So you aren't automatically thinking about your performance. I only got shot once; I felt really sorry for people who had to get shot more times." Once again drawing on the punk rock scene as the natural habitat of the three central friends in the film, Dudes plunges them into the world of the wild American West when they have a tragic run-in with some violent rednecks. What ensues is both comical, action-packed, and fueled by Spheeris' love of music, with a soundtrack including such disparate acts as Megadeth, W.A.S.P., The Vandals, Steve Vai, and Jane's Addiction. Though best known today as the star of TV's Two and a Half Men, Cryer will always hold a place in the '80s movie firmament as Ducky in Pretty in Pink (1986). That breakthrough role led to his casting in a rapid succession of films, including the troubled Superman IV: The Quest for Peace and Hiding Out (both 1987) and a comedic pairing with his most famous future co-star, Charlie Sheen, in Hot Shots! (1991). Still a busy actor as well, Roebuck, most recently seen in the series The Man in the High Castle, was cast on the strength of his performance in River's Edge (1986), and remains known today primarily for his TV roles, with the exception of a significant support appearance in The Fugitive (1993). Almost impossible to market outside of the midnight movie crowd, Dudes can lay claim as the decade's only rockabilly punk western survival thriller comedy. You can trace its cinematic DNA back a bit with such counterculture oddities as Zachariah (1971), but the end result is unlike anything else out there and could have been sold successfully as a cult film in the making. Almost every fan of Dudes had to encounter it through its belated VHS release in the early 1990s, as it received only a handful of token theatrical screenings from distributor The Vista Organization (also known as New Century Vista Film Company). Very short-lived and financially troubled, the company started off strong with such films as The Stepfather, The Gate, and The Wraith in 1987, but it soon floundered with a string of misfires and ended up closing shop in 1989 after botching the releases of such sure things as Fright Night Part 2 and Lady in White in 1988. Dudes was actually one of two Cryer films released by Vista in 1987 along with another cable TV and VHS favorite, Morgan Stewart's Coming Home. Unfortunately Dudes befell the same fate as Spheeris's Western Civilization trilogy and remained out of public sight for decades on home video and television, but its return to the public is a cause for celebration as it allows people to enjoy a key entry in the career of a truly unique and fearless American filmmaker. By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1989

Released in United States on Video September 15, 1988

Released in United States September 1987

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1988

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 24-July 2, 1989.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 1987.

Formerly distributed by International Video Entertainment (IVE).

Began shooting August 14, 1986.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States 1989 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 24-July 2, 1989.)

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1988

Released in United States September 1987 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 1987.)

Released in United States on Video September 15, 1988