Dreamscape


1h 35m 1984
Dreamscape

Brief Synopsis

A psychic tries to thwart a plot to control the U.S. president through his dreams.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

A psychic tries to thwart a plot to control the U.S. president through his dreams.

Crew

Julie Ahlberg

Production Coordinator

James M Arnett

Stunt Coordinator

James Aupperle

Visual Effects

Linda M Bass

Costume Designer

Barbara Boguski

Sound Editor

Gary Bourgeois

Sound

Neil Brody

Sound

Joseph Citarella

Sound

Bruce Cohn Curtis

Producer

Tom Curtis

Executive Producer

Michael Daves

Assistant Editor

Lorenzo Destefano

Associate Editor

Rob Doherty

Assistant Director

M J Elliott

Photography

Julie Feiner

Assistant Editor

Kirk Francis

Sound

James W Gavin

Stunts

David Glaser

Props

Rebecca Greeley

Other

Richard Halsey

Editor

Joseph Hornok

Animal Trainer

Aloma Ichinose

Photography

Dream Quest Images

Matte Painter

Maurice Jarre

Music

John Robert Jennings

Animal Trainer

Jack Johnson

Key Grip

Alan Jones

Creative Consultant

Jerry Ketcham

Assistant Director

Peter Kuran

Visual Effects

Peter Kuran

Other

Kevin Kutchaver

Photography

Thomas Lofaro

Assistant Director

David Loughery

Screenplay

Edward Manning

Animator

Barbara Martin

Technical Advisor

Francesca Maxwell

Makeup

Karl Miller

Animal Trainer

Charles Paley

Music Editor

Dennis Pies

Special Effects

Johanna Ray

Casting

Craig Reardon

Other

Craig Reardon

Special Effects

R J Robertson

Rotoscope Animator

Ben Roscolone

Key Grip

Joseph Ruben

Screenplay

Chuck Russell

Associate Producer

Chuck Russell

Screenplay

Clifford Searcy

Art Director

Jeff Staggs

Art Director

David Stone

Sound Editor

Ken Sweet

Sound Editor

Cami Dempsey Taylor

Production Associate

Richard F. Taylor

Special Effects

Richard F. Taylor

Other

Allen Terry

Construction

Jerry Tokofsky

Coproducer

Susumu Tokunow

Sound

Brian Tufano

Director Of Photography

Susan K Turner

Miniatures

David Lewis Yewdall

Sound Editor

Kathy Zatarga

Script Supervisor

Stanley R Zupnik

Executive Producer

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Videos

Movie Clip

Dreamscape (1984) - Cerebral Peeping Tom Ready for his first dream-linking experiment, overseen by scientists Novotny (Max von Sydow) and DeVries (Kate Capshaw), psychic-genius subject Alex (Dennis Quaid) has more success than expected connecting to steel-worker Hardy (Fred Waugh), the first big special effects scene, in Dreamscape, 1984.
Dreamscape (1984) - Doctor Deep Freeze Ambivalent, playful and petulant psychically gifted genius Alex (Dennis Quaid) has been persuaded to take part in a dream research project, doesn’t mind admitting he’s more interested in fetching scientist Dr. DeVries (Kate Capshaw), in Dreamscape, 1984.
Dreamscape (1984) - He Was An Authentic Genius Introducing principals via the pacey opening with Virginia Kiser running from a nuclear fireball, awakening Eddie Albert, Madison Mason checking on him, then Dennis Quaid in a photo, Max von Sydow as Dr. Novotny, Kate Capshaw as Dr. Devries, Christopher Plummer as Blair, then finally at the Los Alamitos track, in the popular sci-fi/thriller Dreamscape, 1984.
Dreamscape (1984) - This Nuclear Madness An abrupt edit begins another nuclear-horror nightmare which again turns out to be in the mind of the widower president (Eddie Albert), comforted by his daughter (Kate Charleson) then receiving Christopher Plummer as mysterious government player Blair, whose motives not revealed, in Dreamscape, 1984.
Dreamscape (1984) - With A Little Help From Science At the pub at the college where research scientist Novotny (Max von Sydow) has brought his gently-kidnapped genius former subject Alex (Dennis Quaid) to talk him into taking part in an experiment about dreaming, detailing the premise in the sci-fi hit Dreamscape, 1984.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Dreamscape


Science fiction dabbles in political paranoia in this intriguing thriller. Dennis Quaid stars as a young psychic helping scientists research dream states. When government agent Christopher Plummer hijacks the project, Quaid has to enter president Eddie Albert's dreams to save him from an assassination plot. Twentieth Century-Fox started with an outline by science-fiction legend Roger Zelazny inspired by his story "He Who Shapes" and his novel The Dream Master. Since they assigned another writer, David Loughery, to do the screen treatment, Zelazny was never credited (he has denied rumors that he deliberately removed his name from the project). Critics and fans were charmed by the film's light tone, particularly as embodied in Quaid's deft performance as the psychic adventurer. The film also benefited greatly from Maurice Jarre's score. Although best known for his symphonic music for such David Lean epics as Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Doctor Zhivago (1965), Jarre insisted on using only electronic music for Dreamscape, arguing it better suited the film's tone. Another highlight includes the impressive designs by Clifford Searcy and Jeff Staggs, which made the dream scenes distinctive and appropriately unsettling.

By Frank Miller
Dreamscape

Dreamscape

Science fiction dabbles in political paranoia in this intriguing thriller. Dennis Quaid stars as a young psychic helping scientists research dream states. When government agent Christopher Plummer hijacks the project, Quaid has to enter president Eddie Albert's dreams to save him from an assassination plot. Twentieth Century-Fox started with an outline by science-fiction legend Roger Zelazny inspired by his story "He Who Shapes" and his novel The Dream Master. Since they assigned another writer, David Loughery, to do the screen treatment, Zelazny was never credited (he has denied rumors that he deliberately removed his name from the project). Critics and fans were charmed by the film's light tone, particularly as embodied in Quaid's deft performance as the psychic adventurer. The film also benefited greatly from Maurice Jarre's score. Although best known for his symphonic music for such David Lean epics as Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Doctor Zhivago (1965), Jarre insisted on using only electronic music for Dreamscape, arguing it better suited the film's tone. Another highlight includes the impressive designs by Clifford Searcy and Jeff Staggs, which made the dream scenes distinctive and appropriately unsettling. By Frank Miller

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)


Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99.

The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941).

His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956).

As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace.

After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78).

The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99. The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956). As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace. After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78). The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States August 1984

Released in United States Summer August 1, 1984

Completed shooting December 1983.

Released in United States August 1984

Released in United States Summer August 1, 1984