Dreaming Lips


1h 34m 1937

Film Details

Release Date
May 28, 1937
Premiere Information
London premiere: 2 Feb 1937; New York opening: week of 19 May 1937
Production Company
Trafalgar Film Productions, Ltd.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Melo by Henry Bernstein (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Gaby is the young wife of orchestra violinist Peter Lawrence. Peter is thrilled to learn that his old school friend, famous violinist Miguel de Vavo, is coming to play a concert with his orchestra. Peter insists that Gaby hear his friend play, and she is immediately entranced by Miguel's music. The two fall in love and decide to confront her husband with the truth, but Peter suddenly falls gravely ill. Gaby is unwilling to leave her husband in his hour of need and becomes his nurse and constant companion, devoting herself fully to his recovery. Miguel leaves for a tour of America, but his love for Gaby is too strong to keep him away from her. Upon her lover's return, Gaby becomes torn between her desire for the violinist and her loyalty to her husband. Mentally and physically exhausted, she commits suicide by throwing herself in the Thames River, taking her secret with her.

Film Details

Release Date
May 28, 1937
Premiere Information
London premiere: 2 Feb 1937; New York opening: week of 19 May 1937
Production Company
Trafalgar Film Productions, Ltd.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Melo by Henry Bernstein (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Hollywood Reporter reports that Elisabeth Bergner's participation in this film was a fulfillment of a one-picture contract with United Artists, which was initially believed to be a personal contract with United Artists executive partner Samuel Goldwyn. Contemporary reviews note that the film is a recreation of the 1932 German version of the same material, entitled Der Traumende Mund, which was also directed by Paul Czinner and starred Bergner and Rudolf Foster. Some critics claimed that Bergner recreated her original performance "gesture for gesture." According to ^MPH , the London Pavilion premiere of this film was the first public appearance of Queen Mother Mary after the death of King George V. Variety stated that the London Symphony Orchestra performed in the film. The American version of this film was approximately twenty minutes shorter than the English version. According to modern sources, United Artists had great difficulty distributing the film in the United States, as many exhibitors refused the film, claiming it "was unfit to be shown." A French version, Melo, made in 1932, starred Gaby Morlay and Maria Fromet, and was also directed by Czinner. Modern sources indicate that the film was reissued in Great Britain in 1944.