Dracula: Dead and Loving It


1h 30m 1995

Brief Synopsis

Count Dracula, the Prince of Darkness, is dead and he's loving it but he's also in for some ego-puncturing problems and horrific surprises never encountered by Bela Lugosi or Gary Oldman. On Dracula's bumpy quest for blood, the blundering bloodsucker exhibits a dazzling and hilarious array of supernatural magic, including flying, superhuman falls, hanging upside-down, clinging to the ceiling, long-distance hypnosis, shadows with a mind of their own, and morphing into an accident-prone bat. Meanwhile, the immortal count's mortal enemy, Dr. Van Helsing, a brilliant professor of weird phenomena and world-famous vampire hunter, is busily masterminding the plan to expose and corner the bloodsucker who has infiltrated London's high society.

Film Details

Also Known As
Dracula - död men lycklig, Dracula, mort et heureux de l'être
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Period
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
CASTLE ROCK ENTERTAINMENT/SONY PICTURES RELEASING
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Count Dracula, the Prince of Darkness, is dead and he's loving it but he's also in for some ego-puncturing problems and horrific surprises never encountered by Bela Lugosi or Gary Oldman. On Dracula's bumpy quest for blood, the blundering bloodsucker exhibits a dazzling and hilarious array of supernatural magic, including flying, superhuman falls, hanging upside-down, clinging to the ceiling, long-distance hypnosis, shadows with a mind of their own, and morphing into an accident-prone bat. Meanwhile, the immortal count's mortal enemy, Dr. Van Helsing, a brilliant professor of weird phenomena and world-famous vampire hunter, is busily masterminding the plan to expose and corner the bloodsucker who has infiltrated London's high society.

Crew

Peter Albiez

Special Effects

Tom Altobello

Assistant Property Master

Larz Anderson

Special Effects

Michael Anzalone

Production Assistant

Daniel Arkin

Assistant Editor

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Bill Banyai

Other

Bruce Barbour

Stand-In

Andy Bass

Other

Heidi Baumgarten

Props Buyer

Jeff Beattie

Editor

Scott Beattie

Motion Control

Frank Bennett

Original Music

Rick Bernos

Other

Alan Blauvelt

Assistant Camera Operator

Tim Bowen

On-Set Dresser

Bill Bowling

Location Manager

Mel Brooks

Screenplay

Mel Brooks

Producer

Jo Lumpkin Brown

Other

Clyde E Bryan

Camera Assistant

Janet Campolito

Assistant Production Coordinator

Danny Cangemi

Special Effects Foreman

Michael Cavette

Assistant

Dianne Chadwick

Production Assistant

Lindsay D. Chag

Casting

Terry P Chapman

Special Effects

Jim Chesney

Transportation Coordinator

Ron Chesney

Production Assistant

John Cleveland

Key Rigging Grip

Gary Combs

Stunt Coordinator

Gene Cooper

Art Department

Lauren Cory

Set Designer

Don Coufal

Sound

Louis Countee

Adr

Robert C Crockett

Grip

Robin Cross

Accounting Assistant

David Crowther

Assistant Editor

John Cucci

Foley Artist

David H Cunningham

Other

Phil Dagort

Visual Effects

Blaise Dahlquist

Rigging Gaffer

Clark Davis

Craft Service

Jennifer Dawson

Assistant Property Master

Mark Dawson

Other

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Kevin B Dean

Grip

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Suzanne Degrandis

Accounting Assistant

Carlos Delarios

Rerecording

Dan Deleeuw

Digital Effects Supervisor

Rudy Deluca

From Story

Rudy Deluca

Story By

Rudy Deluca

Screenplay

Paul Delucca

Costumes

Linda Demarco

Color Timer

Charles Demuth

Costume Supervisor

Wendy Dobrowner

Matte Painter

Rob Dressel

Graphic Artist

David Dunbar

Lighting Technician

Kimo Easterwood

Lighting Technician

Jane English

Makeup Artist

Mike Evans

Costumes

Jon Falkengren

Grip

Kevin Fitzgerald

Assistant Camera Operator

Wayne Fitzgerald

Main Title Design

Crys Forsyth-smith

Production Manager

Dorothy D Fox

Hair Stylist

Alan Friedman

Makeup Artist

Neil Gahm

Other

Mark M Galvin

Executive Producer

Mark Garbarino

Assistant

Belinda Gardea

Casting Associate

Marc Gebauer

Other

Gary S. Gerlich

Sound Editor

Gregory M Gerlich

Sound Editor

Roy Goldman

Stand-In

Gregg Goldstone

Assistant Director

Jeff Gomillion

Adr Mixer

Douglas Greenfield

Consultant

Chris Gutierrez

On-Set Dresser

Steve Haberman

Screenplay

Steve Haberman

From Story

Steve Haberman

Story By

Joseph Hagey

Motion Control

Marlin Hall

Key Grip

Jerelyn Harding

Adr Editor

Deborah Harman

On-Set Dresser

Dennis L Harper

Grip

Randy Harrington

Stand-In

Chris Heeter

Assistant

Christine Heinz

Costume Supervisor

Cheryl Henry

Stand-In

Mo Henry

Negative Cutting

Daren Hicks

Production Coordinator

Matt Hightower

Graphic Artist

Bruce Robert Hill

Art Director

Greg Holland

Sound

Darin Hollings

Graphic Artist

Dustin Huber

Electrician

Jeffrey Hunt

Lighting Technician

Dream Quest Images

Visual Effects

Chris Jackson

Assistant Editor

Barbara Ann Jaeckel

Set Designer

Johnnie Jenkins

Other

Greg C Jensen

Special Effects Foreman

Alan Johnson

Choreographer

Kristen Frances Jones

On-Set Dresser

K Lenna Katich

Production Accountant

Terry Kempf

Other

Al Kenders

Other

Blaine Kennison

Visual Effects

James J Keys

Electrician

Scott S Keys

Lighting Technician

Betty Kibbe

Stand-In

Gary B Kibbe

Photography

Rick Kline

Rerecording

Carlin Kmetz

Matte Painter

George D Knight

Grip

Elliot L. Koretz

Sound Editor

Conrad Krumm

Special Effects

Erwin H Kupitz

Wig Supplier

Allen Lafferty

Other

Tim Lafferty

Other

Anne Laing

Apprentice

Wayne Lamkay

Production Assistant

Norman Langley

Camera Operator

Robert Latham Brown

Associate Producer

Robert Latham Brown

Production Manager

David Lauer

Visual Effects

Chris Ledesma

Music Editor

Tricia Lewis

Assistant

Steve Lively

Music Contractor

Rick Lopez

Rerecording

John Lubin

Grip

Ryan Luithly

Foley

Hummie Mann

Music

Jack M Marino

Property Master

David Marquette

Other

Charles May

Video Assist/Playback

Michael May

Camera Assistant

Brian Mccarty

Music

Todd Mcintosh

Makeup

Monty Mckee

Stand-In

Joe Mckenzie

Electrician

Raymond Michels

Grip

Douglas R Miller

Other

Michael J Miller

Other

Kenneth J Moore

Transportation Captain

Colin C Mouat

Sound Editor

John Murrah

Graphic Artist

Robert A Nelson

Best Boy Grip

Don Nemitz

Original Music

David R Newhouse

Other

Robert Glen Newhouse

Other

Deborah A Nikkel

Production Coordinator

Daniel B Nix

Camera

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Dianne O'connor

Art Department Coordinator

Larry O'dien

Assistant

Michael O'shea

Director Of Photography

Michael O'shea

Dp/Cinematographer

Sean O'shea

Assistant Camera Operator

Marcie Olivi

Set Costumer

Marlo Pabon

Visual Effects

Joseph G. Pacelli

Set Designer

Katy Pacitti

Assistant

Charlene Painter

Choreographer

Jan Pascale

Set Decorator

Ron Peebles

Rigging Grip

Carol Pershing

Hair Stylist

Sonny Pettijohn

Assistant Sound Editor

John M Phillips

Sound Editor

Robert A Phillips

Special Effects

Jerry Pirozzi

Foley Editor

Lambert Powell

Special Effects

Albert Ramos

Dolly Grip

Corky Randall

Other

Richard Ratliff

Special Effects Coordinator

Michael Reale

Other

Rick Riccio

Other

Gary H Rizzo

On-Set Dresser

Carl Robarge

Other

Dennis Sager

Foley Recordist

Ahmed Saker

Other

Gary Sampson

Costumes

Hal Sanders

Sound Editor

Gary Schaedler

Special Effects

Peter Schindler

Unit Director

Peter Schindler

Executive Producer

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

David A. Schreiber

Assistant

Woody Schultz

Production Assistant

Carol Schwartz

Makeup Artist

Robert Scott

Assistant Director

Jay Selvester

Other

John Semedik

Accounting Assistant

Steve Shaver

Lighting

Mike Shea

Visual Effects Supervisor

Bill Shepard

Casting

Film Details

Also Known As
Dracula - död men lycklig, Dracula, mort et heureux de l'être
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Period
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
CASTLE ROCK ENTERTAINMENT/SONY PICTURES RELEASING
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Dracula - Dead and Loving It on DVD


The great movie producer Irving Thalberg used to have a sure-fire formula for movie success. He called it the "99-Yard Touchdown" and it worked like this: near the end of the movie, the hero is at his lowest point with no sign of rescue in sight. Then, in the last few minutes, the hero miraculously turns everything around, achieving victory. Mel Brooks could be said to have had his own 99-yard touchdown with the overwhelming success of his hit Broadway musical The Producers. If that can be considered the success, Dracula - Dead And Loving It! (1995), newly released on DVD by Warner Home Video, could be considered Mel at the one-yard line.

Mel Brooks' most recent in a string of parodies of classic Hollywood movies, does have some laughs. Peter Nicoll does a nice imitation of Dwight Frye's mannerisms in the original Dracula (1931) and steals the show in a scene in which he tries to convince Harvey Korman's Dr. Seward that he is not insane, all the while snatching bugs off the table and popping them into his mouth. Also noteworthy are the sets by Bruce Robert Hill featuring a perfect copy of Lugosi's cobwebbed staircase from the original Dracula and color photography by Michael D. O'Shea that is beautiful if sometimes too brightly lit.

So why does Dracula - Dead And Loving It! just lie there, especially considering the still-potent comic power of Brooks' Blazing Saddles (1974) and Young Frankenstein (1974)? For one thing, the timing, as with most of the latter Mel Brooks movies, is a good deal slower than those earlier examples. There is nothing sadder than a film comedy that pauses to let the laughter die down when there is no laughter to die down.

Next the comic invention tends to run out quickly. Renfield suffers from motion sickness caused by a bumpy stagecoach ride but, because the sun is going down, the driver does nothing but speed up. Renfield gets thrown around the inside of the stagecoach but nothing more comes of it. In another scene Brooks and company build a shiphold on gimbals to show Dracula's coffin sliding back and forth and bumping into the walls, but other than him groaning as the coffin hits the walls and Renfield failing to stop it, there is no payoff. Remember Dr. Frankenstein being choked by the monster in Young Frankenstein and going into charades to tell Igor to prepare a sedative? A few seconds of that scene has more invention than long stretches of Dracula - Dead And Loving It!.

The biggest drawback, however, is the approach to Dracula himself. Casting Leslie Nielsen as Dracula might not have been a bad idea. The Nielsen of Airplane! (1980), playing the role with perfect seriousness, might have managed it. Brooks, however, cannot resist letting Nielsen play the classic bloodsucker as a buffoon, banging his head or falling down the stairs of his castle. Afterwards, Nielsen will pull another of his goofy expressions from the Naked Gun movies. This completely undercuts the character when he is suppose to be threatening or seductive. What made Gene Wilder's Dr. Frankenstein so funny was the dignity with which he tried to carry himself as everything went wrong around him.

Those of Brooks' fans who must own everything will find a well-packaged presentation in the Dracula - Dead And Loving It! DVD. The image is available letterboxed and in 16X9 formats and is accompanied by a feature length commentary track by Brooks, his two writers and his co-stars Steven Weber and Amy Yasbeck. Although it would be asking a bit too much to love this Dracula, some mild chuckles will be found by the patient.

For more information about Dracula - Dead and Loving It, visit Warner Video. To order Dracula - Dead and Loving It, go to TCM Shopping.

by Brian Cady
Dracula - Dead And Loving It On Dvd

Dracula - Dead and Loving It on DVD

The great movie producer Irving Thalberg used to have a sure-fire formula for movie success. He called it the "99-Yard Touchdown" and it worked like this: near the end of the movie, the hero is at his lowest point with no sign of rescue in sight. Then, in the last few minutes, the hero miraculously turns everything around, achieving victory. Mel Brooks could be said to have had his own 99-yard touchdown with the overwhelming success of his hit Broadway musical The Producers. If that can be considered the success, Dracula - Dead And Loving It! (1995), newly released on DVD by Warner Home Video, could be considered Mel at the one-yard line. Mel Brooks' most recent in a string of parodies of classic Hollywood movies, does have some laughs. Peter Nicoll does a nice imitation of Dwight Frye's mannerisms in the original Dracula (1931) and steals the show in a scene in which he tries to convince Harvey Korman's Dr. Seward that he is not insane, all the while snatching bugs off the table and popping them into his mouth. Also noteworthy are the sets by Bruce Robert Hill featuring a perfect copy of Lugosi's cobwebbed staircase from the original Dracula and color photography by Michael D. O'Shea that is beautiful if sometimes too brightly lit. So why does Dracula - Dead And Loving It! just lie there, especially considering the still-potent comic power of Brooks' Blazing Saddles (1974) and Young Frankenstein (1974)? For one thing, the timing, as with most of the latter Mel Brooks movies, is a good deal slower than those earlier examples. There is nothing sadder than a film comedy that pauses to let the laughter die down when there is no laughter to die down. Next the comic invention tends to run out quickly. Renfield suffers from motion sickness caused by a bumpy stagecoach ride but, because the sun is going down, the driver does nothing but speed up. Renfield gets thrown around the inside of the stagecoach but nothing more comes of it. In another scene Brooks and company build a shiphold on gimbals to show Dracula's coffin sliding back and forth and bumping into the walls, but other than him groaning as the coffin hits the walls and Renfield failing to stop it, there is no payoff. Remember Dr. Frankenstein being choked by the monster in Young Frankenstein and going into charades to tell Igor to prepare a sedative? A few seconds of that scene has more invention than long stretches of Dracula - Dead And Loving It!. The biggest drawback, however, is the approach to Dracula himself. Casting Leslie Nielsen as Dracula might not have been a bad idea. The Nielsen of Airplane! (1980), playing the role with perfect seriousness, might have managed it. Brooks, however, cannot resist letting Nielsen play the classic bloodsucker as a buffoon, banging his head or falling down the stairs of his castle. Afterwards, Nielsen will pull another of his goofy expressions from the Naked Gun movies. This completely undercuts the character when he is suppose to be threatening or seductive. What made Gene Wilder's Dr. Frankenstein so funny was the dignity with which he tried to carry himself as everything went wrong around him. Those of Brooks' fans who must own everything will find a well-packaged presentation in the Dracula - Dead And Loving It! DVD. The image is available letterboxed and in 16X9 formats and is accompanied by a feature length commentary track by Brooks, his two writers and his co-stars Steven Weber and Amy Yasbeck. Although it would be asking a bit too much to love this Dracula, some mild chuckles will be found by the patient. For more information about Dracula - Dead and Loving It, visit Warner Video. To order Dracula - Dead and Loving It, go to TCM Shopping. by Brian Cady

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 22, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 25, 1996

Began shooting May 8, 1995.

Completed shooting July 26, 1995.

Released in United States Winter December 22, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 25, 1996