Doin' Time on Planet Earth


1h 25m 1988

Brief Synopsis

Ryan Richmond, a lonely teenager living a Holiday Inn in Arizona, finds his world turned upside down when he learns there's a chance he may be an alien prince from another planet.

Film Details

Also Known As
Coming Down to Earth
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Synopsis

Ryan Richmond, a lonely teenager living a Holiday Inn in Arizona, finds his world turned upside down when he learns there's a chance he may be an alien prince from another planet.

Crew

Haim Adut

Hair Assistant

George S Ball

Electrician

Alan Balsam

Editor

Martin Becker

Special Effects

Izak Benmeir

Boom Operator

Carol D Bonnefil

Assistant Director

Shunil Borpujari

Key Grip

Mayling Braun

Other

Frank Bueno

Assistant Director

Duane Clark

Production Assistant

Denise Cochran

Assistant Editor

Byron J Cohen

Photography

Richard Connor

Production Associate

Andre B Costa

Grip

Anne Couk

Assistant Editor

Michelle Deal

Swing Gang

Anna Delanzo

Boom Operator

Mary Jo Devenney

Sound Mixer

Martha Elcan

Assistant Director

Evan A Ensign

On-Set Dresser

Joseph Fiacco

Props

Robert N Field

Electrician

Paul D Fischer

Grip

Sarah Fitzsimmons

Production Coordinator

Rachel A. Flores

Dolly Grip

Gabe Cubos Gabriel

Boom Operator

Yoram Globus

Executive Producer

Menahem Golan

Executive Producer

Scott Guthrie

Gaffer

Robert Guzman

Electrician

Nancy Banta Hansen

Script Supervisor

Paula Herold

Casting

Cindy Hochman

Production Coordinator

Vered Hochman

Makeup

Steve Housewright

Location Manager

Colin D Irwin

Art Director

Robert Jackson

Boom Operator

Libby Jacobs

Costumes

Jimmy Jones

Transportation Coordinator

Ronald Judkins

Sound Mixer

Dana Kaproff

Music

Mark D Karen

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Kasyan

Production Assistant

Bettie Kauffman

Special Effects

Dianne Ketchum

Location Manager

Joe Killian

Transportation Captain

Andrew Kimbrough

Art Department Coordinator

Karen Koch

Associate Producer

Cynthia K Lagerstrom

Electrician

Suzanne Lapick

Property Master

Adrian Licciardi

Assistant Camera Operator

Andrew Licht

From Story

David Lux

Storyboard Artist

Richard Manfredi

On-Set Dresser

Frances Mathias

Hair

Greg Mccullough

Electrician

Michele Mcguire

Assistant

Eric Mcleod

Consultant

Bill Millar

Visual Effects Designer

Douglas Mowat

Set Decorator

Jeffrey Mueller

From Story

Mike Nomad

Stunt Coordinator

Patrick Peach

Electrician

Christopher Pearce

Unit Production Manager

Donald Paul Pemrick

Casting

Michael Pizzuto

Grip

Robert A Preston

Electrician

Joel Renfro

Transportation Coordinator

Reve Richards

Costume Designer

Bill Roberts

Camera Assistant

Sharyn L Ross

Editor

Karen R Sachs

Production Assistant

Curtis A Schnell

Production Designer

Katharine Read Slonaker

Assistant

Darren Star

Screenplay

Darren Star

From Story

Marcy Stoeven

Photography

Garreth Stover

On-Set Dresser

Timothy Suhrstedt

Director Of Photography

George T Sweney

Auditor

Gil Talamantes

Transportation Co-Captain

Anton Uhl

Assistant Art Director

Dennis K Wilson

Grip

Tamar Mor Wyman

Assistant

Wendy Yorkshire

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Coming Down to Earth
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Articles

Martha Scott, 1914-2003


Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88.

Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery.

She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade.

Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88. Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery. She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade. Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall 1988

Released in United States Fall September 21, 1988

Released in United States on Video April 26, 1989

Feature directorial debut for Charles Matthau, the son of Academy Award-winning actor Walter Matthau.

Began shooting October 29, 1986.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States Fall 1988

Released in United States Fall September 21, 1988

Released in United States on Video April 26, 1989