Dizzy Dames


1h 5m 1935

Film Details

Release Date
May 1, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Liberty Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Liberty Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the short story "The Watch Dog" by P. G. Wodehouse in Hampton's Magazine (Jul 1910).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

Lillian Bennett, a former theater professional, is now the proprietor of a comfortable and respectable theatrical boardinghouse. To keep her daughter Helen from the stage, Lillian has not told her of her past career, and has kept Helen at a boarding school. Helen pays her mother a surprise visit, only notifying her by wire the very day she arrives. Lillian makes her boarders, including Arlette, Buzz, La Vere and Dad Hackett, promise to behave as proper ladies and gentlemen and to not reveal their occupations. The secret is kept until the guests are rushed into roles to liven up an amateur musical production at a charitable society function. Terry, a tenor who is not in on Lillian's plans, exposes the truth when he tells Helen of his songwriting ambitions. Helen feels the lure of the theater and wants to work with Terry, although she is courted by a wealthy suitor favored by Lillian. During the performance at the rich youth's estate, the romance and talent of Helen and Terry triumph thanks to Lillian's change of heart.

Film Details

Release Date
May 1, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Liberty Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Liberty Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Suggested by the short story "The Watch Dog" by P. G. Wodehouse in Hampton's Magazine (Jul 1910).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Film Length
9 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The P. G. Wodehouse story "The Watch Dog" was subsequently published in England by Strand Magazine under the title "Love Me, Love My Dog." In some advertisements for the film, "The Martinique," which was sung by Lillian Miles and Lawrence Gray, is prominently featured immediately below the film's title. According to modern sources, Arthur Swanstrom was an additional collaborator on the words and music of "The Martinique."