Daughter of the West


1h 16m 1949

Film Details

Also Known As
Daughter of Ramona
Release Date
Feb 15, 1949
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Martin Mooney Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Film Classics, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Daughter of Ramona by Robert E. Callahan (New York, 1930).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Film Length
6,930ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

At her home at California's Mission San Juan Capistrano, Lolita Moreno, who unknown to her is the daughter of the slain Indian heroine Ramona, prepares to leave for a new teaching job at a Navajo reservation in Arizona. Before she boards the stagecoach, Lolita says farewell to her guardian, Father Vallejo, who gives her a cross pendant which belonged to her mother, but does not reveal her mother's identity. When the stage is still several miles from the reservation, the driver stops and explains that his route ends there. Dismayed, Lolita gets out, then agrees to deliver a package to a reservation resident named Navo White Eagle. Sometime later, Navo arrives in a horse-driven cart, collects the package from Lolita and offers her a lift to the reservation. When they arrive, Navo takes Lolita to her hosts, Mr. and Mrs. Beggs, who operate the reservation's trading post. There, Lolita meets the man who hired her, Indian agent Ralph Connors, who is secretly planning to steal some of the reservation's land because of a rich copper vein located there. Later, the chief's daughter Okeema quarrels with her lover Yuba, who has sensed her feelings for Navo. Yuba tells Connors that Navo has been selected as the tribe's new spokesman, and after he overhears Navo rejecting Okeema's romantic advances, Connors persuades her to come to his office that evening. There, Connors gives Okeema an ink pad, tells her to put her fingerprints onto a stack of documents bearing his agency's letterhead, then tries to seduce her. Later, Navo's mother Wateeka invites Lolita to dinner, and comments on Lolita's crucifix, saying she recalls seeing it on a young bride at the Mission San Diego. At a harvest festival hosted by Connors, Navo finds the drunken chiefs sleeping in the back of Yuba's wagon. After Yuba is arrested, he is shot in the back by Connors' henchman, Jed Morgan. Later, Jed and a vengeful Okeema implicate Navo in the shooting, and he is arrested. When the chief learns of the charge, he obtains permission from Connors to administer tribal justice to Navo. The tribe decides to banish Navo from the reservation, but he refuses to leave, and instead, demands a trial by fire. Navo then walks several feet over burning hot embers to prove his innocence. After she overhears Connors saying that he plans to kidnap and marry Lolita, Okeema guiltily confesses her misdeed to Wateeka, while Navo eavesdrops. Later, Lolita reports to a fort, where warrants are issued for the arrest of Connors and Jed. When Okeema kills herself by jumping from a bridge, the chief, who knows that his daughter died for Connors' love, buries her on the land adjoining Connors' office in protest of his actions. After Connors and Jed try to escape with the illegally obtained land transfers, they are captured and sentenced to death. Later, Navo is appointed Indian agent for the reservation, and he and Lolita kiss.

Film Details

Also Known As
Daughter of Ramona
Release Date
Feb 15, 1949
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Martin Mooney Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Film Classics, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Daughter of Ramona by Robert E. Callahan (New York, 1930).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Film Length
6,930ft (9 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Daughter of Ramona. The Variety review noted that the story deals with "the daughter of Ramona, heroine of an earlier book-film classic." In 1936, Fox released Ramona, which starred Loretta Young and Don Ameche and was directed by Henry King (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3616).