Dances With Wolves


3h 3m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A soldier stationed in North Dakota leaves his post to join a nearby Sioux tribe.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bailando con lobos, Balla Coi Lupi, Danse avec les loups, Danza con Lobos, Der mit dem Wolf Tanzt, mit dem Wolf Tanzt, Der
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
War
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Lee Loesch
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA; Rapid City, South Dakota, USA; Fort Pierre, South Dakota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 3m

Synopsis

Dunbar is a Civil War soldier who requests a transfer to the western frontier. Alone at his post, Dunbar befriends the nearby Sioux Indians, slowly becoming accepted into their culture. When the army returns, Dunbar finds himself torn between two worlds, and must decide where his allegiance lies.

Crew

David L Aaron

Titles

Wes Adams

Driver

J R Allen

Driver

Albert Aquino

Boom Operator

Bonnie Arnold

Associate Producer

Ron Ashmore

Other

Tammy Ashmore

Makeup Assistant

David Atherton

Makeup

James Augare

Stunts

Scotty Augare

Wrangler

Gregory Avellone

Assistant

Robert D Bailey

Camera

Barbara Barnaby

Adr Editor

Steven K Barnett

On-Set Dresser

John Barry

Music

Rob Beebe

Costumes

Jeffrey Beecroft

Production Designer

Larry Belitz

Technical Advisor

Bill W Benton

Sound

Howard Berger

Other

Joel Berkovitz

Foley Editor

David A Best

Foreman

Ivica Bilich

Property Master

Birgitta Bjerke

Costume Supervisor

Michael Blake

Screenplay

Michael Blake

Source Material (From Novel)

Lee Blasingame

Assistant Camera Operator

Charles Bludsworth

Property Master

Michael Blundell

Electrician

Michael Bolan

Special Effects Assistant

Brad Booth

Other

Bryon Bower

Grip

Linda Bowman

Hair Assistant

Linda Brachman

Assistant Director

James A Bradley

Swing Gang

Susan Brown

Casting Associate

Peter Buffett

Music

Stephen Burg

Visual Effects

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

William H Burton

Stunts

Tom Byrnes

Production Assistant

John C Cameron

Property Master Assistant

Andy Cannon

Other

Frank Carrisosa

Makeup Supervisor

Brenda J Carroll

Stand-In

Steve Chambers

Stunts

Jason Charger

Stunts

Leonard Charger

Stunts

Paul Clark

Production

John Coinman

Music Supervisor

Allison Conant

Assistant

Danny Costa

Stunts

Kevin Costner

Producer

Doug Cowden

Grip

Loren Cuny

Stunts

Paul Curley

Camera

Jay B Curry

Swing Gang

Monte Curry

Other

R L Curtin

Wrangler

Thomas A Davila

Accounting Assistant

Mark Davison

Assistant Camera Operator

Lisa Dean

Set Decorator

Ricky Dehorse

Stunts

Robert Des Jarlais

Carpenter

Mary Jo Devenney

Sound Mixer

Tony Devito

Grip

Bill Deyonge

Other

Ruben Domingo

Sound Editor

Lynda Donahue

Production Assistant

Dan Dooley

Driver

Alune Dubray

Animal Trainer

Fred Dubray

Animal Trainer

Duffy Ducheneaux

Stunts

Bernie Duffy

Driver

Catherine Duffy

Casting Associate

Dana Duffy

Driver

Robbie Dunn

Stunts

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Mike Dunson

Grip

John Duvall

Foley Editor

Jake Eberts

Executive Producer

Lyle Ehlers

Grip

Mark Eilers

Production Assistant

Elle Elliott

Hair

Bob Erickson

Wrangler

Tutt A Esquerre

Craft Service

Jan Evans

Script Supervisor

H. P. Evetts

Stunts

Al Eylar

Foreman

Ed Fassl

Sound Editor

Leigh Feitelberg

Other

Lynne Ferry

Production Assistant

Courtney Field

Driver

Ron M Field

Driver

Reed A Finch

Carpenter

Robert Fitzgerald

Sound Designer

Robert Fitzgerald

Sound Editor

Charles Fogg

Production

Blair Forward

Video Playback

Phil Fravel

Driver

Billy Joe Fredericks

Stunts

Jeff Fredericks

Stunts

Pete Fredericks

Stunts

Terrance Eugence Fredericks

Stunts

Kerry J Frosh

Carpenter

David A Fudge

Dga Trainee

Jerry G Gallaway

Camera

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Howard Gindoff

Sound Editor

Rocco Gioffre

Matte Painter

Michael E Gips

Camera

Ben Glass

Photography

Tea Jay Glass

Makeup Assistant

Terri Goett

Makeup Assistant

Julia Gombert

Assistant

Raymond Gonzales

Electrician

Barbara G Gordon

Set Costumer

Edward Gorsuch

Production Assistant

Dawna Gravatt

Production

Tamara Guthrie

Hair

Carter Hanner

Driver

Doris Hartley

Production Coordinator

Stacey Hartley

Other

Paul Arthur Hartman

On-Set Dresser

John Haun

Production Accountant

Darryl Hayes

Swing Gang

Karin Hayes

Makeup Assistant

Rene Haynes

Casting

Kim Heath

Dolly Grip

Rusty Hendrickson

Stunts

Rusty Hendrickson

Animal Trainer

Rusty Hendrickson

Animal Wrangler

Jim Hill

Foreman

Tim Hill

Craft Service

Chris A Hipple

Location Assistant

Craig Hofstrand

Driver

Tim Hoggatt

Foley Mixer

Larry Hoki

Sound

Marvin Holy

Carpenter

Roy Houck

Animal Services

Kanin J. Howell

Stunts

Norman Howell

Stunt Man

Norman Howell

Stunt Coordinator

Shawn Howell

Stunts

William Hoy

Editor

John Huneck

Director Of Photography

Beth Ann Irion

Production Assistant

Jay Ivers

Other

Tim Jacobs

Stunts

Chris Jargo

Adr Editor

Kymberly Jenkins

Production Assistant

James Jensen

Camera Assistant

C L Johnson

Stunts

Jacqueline C Johnson

Production Assistant

Jay Johnson

Titles

Wayne Jones

Transportation Co-Captain

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Derek Kavanagh

Unit Production Manager

Derek Kavanagh

Line Producer

Sean Kavanagh

Assistant

Scott Kelly

Driver

Joseph E Knott

Special Effects Assistant

Robert L Knott

Special Effects Supervisor

Clif Kohlweck

Music Editor

Dan Koko

Stunts

Robert Kurtzman

Other

Jolene Kusser

Driver

J R Kussman

Props

Gumbo Lamb

Stunts

Duane Lammers

Animal Services

Dayna Lee

On-Set Dresser

Elisabeth Leustig

Casting

Wade Livermont

Stunts

Lee Loesch

Cable Operator

Bruz Luger

Stunts

Jody Luger

Stunts

Alvin Lunak

Stunts

Alvin Lunak

Wrangler

Robert C Lusted

Assistant Editor

Todd Macdonald

Driver

Brian Macguire

Driver

Steve E Martin

Stunts

Chip Masamitsu

Editor

Heather Matisoff

Hair Assistant

Susan Mcclean

Music

David Mcgill

Camera

Fred Mclane

Camera Assistant

Cliff Mclaughlin

Stunts

Moira Mclaughlin

Production Assistant

Greig Mcritchie

Original Music

Timothy B Merrill

Video

Ron R Merritt

Driver

Doug Metzger

Assistant Director

Beth Miller

Hair Assistant

Deborah Mills-gusmano

Hair Assistant

Robert Molitor

Driver

Patrick Mollman

Carpenter

Leonard Morganti

Visual Effects

Linda Moss

Sound Editor

J Michael Muro

Camera Operator

Film Details

Also Known As
Bailando con lobos, Balla Coi Lupi, Danse avec les loups, Danza con Lobos, Der mit dem Wolf Tanzt, mit dem Wolf Tanzt, Der
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
War
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Lee Loesch
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA; Rapid City, South Dakota, USA; Fort Pierre, South Dakota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 3m

Award Wins

Best Adapted Screenplay

1990

Best Cinematography

1990

Best Director

1990
Kevin Costner

Best Editing

1990
Neil Travis

Best Picture

1990

Best Score

1990

Best Sound

1990

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1990
Kevin Costner

Best Art Direction

1990

Best Costume Design

1990

Best Supporting Actor

1990

Best Supporting Actress

1990
Mary Mcdonnell

Articles

Dances With Wolves


Leading man Kevin Costner made his directorial debut in 1990 with Dances with Wolves, the fictional tale of a despondent white man who regains his sense of purpose with a tribe of American Indians against the backdrop of the western frontier. The film was a hard sell: Westerns were not in vogue at the time, not to mention that Costner was insistent on keeping the running time at a potentially-lethal three hours as well as relying on the heavy use of subtitles. Accordingly, he was unable to secure any funding for the project through typical US channels, ultimately getting aid from a British investor and paying the rest out of his own pocket. The critics were kind but ultimately panned the offering as an exercise in self-indulgence: one remarked that Costner's Indian name would have been more accurate as "Obsesses with People Silhouetted Against Horizons." Concerns grew as budgets began to overflow and the shooting schedule continued to be extended; industry insiders tagged the project as "Kevin's Gate", referring to the infamous production catastrophe of Heaven's Gate (1980) ten years before. Despite all the ominous signs, Dances with Wolves opened to enthusiastic audiences, eventually grossing over 400 million in worldwide box office receipts. The film was nominated for twelve Academy Awards and won seven, including Best Picture and Best Director for Costner, beating out the critics' darling Goodfellas (1990) and its director, Martin Scorsese.

The roots of Dances with Wolves were seeded 8 years earlier, with Costner's first screen credit, a largely forgettable offering titled Stacy's Knights (1983). The film's greatest contribution was the initial collaboration between Costner, the film's director, Jim Wilson, and the scriptwriter Michael Blake. In subsequent years, Wilson and Costner would create a production company and make seven films together, including Dances with Wilson in the producer's seat. Their continued friendship with Blake provided for an evening the writer spent at the Costner house several years later in which he first described the idea for Dances with Wolves in preparation for developing it as a screenplay. According to Blake from a 1990 Rolling Stone article, Costner was instantly attracted to the project but strongly urged the writer to write the story as a novel first versus a script. Blake obliged, producing a tome which thoroughly engaged Wilson and helped him visualize the story. Costner soon agreed, deeming the book, "the clearest idea of a movie I'd ever read." Although Blake always saw Costner in the director's chair, he had another actor in mind when writing the story: Viggo Mortensen, most recently of The Lord of the Rings trilogy fame. Blake explained, "I said, 'Kev, I don't know if anyone is going to really believe in you [in this part] after seeing your other movies.' And he said, 'Don't worry about it.' One thing I've learned about Kevin is that you do not bet against him, no matter what he's going to do. As it turns out, I think he's done some of his best acting work in this movie."

As a first-time director, Costner impressed many not only with the ambitiousness of the epic project but his ability to handily pull it off: the project spanned a five-month shoot schedule on location in South Dakota with over 700 cast members and extras with temperatures ranging from a boiling 115 in the height of the summer months down to 20 degrees as the chilliness of Autumn set in. In a marked departure from a typical shoot, almost every scene (save the opening Civil War ones) were filmed in sequence. This was done in order to ensure weather realism from scene to scene, since so much of the action takes place outdoors. A tremendous amount of time and resources were allocated to the learning and delivery of the Lakota Sioux dialect, making Dances the first major feature film to use authentic Indian language onscreen with subtitles. Costner defended his atypical decisions with passion: "You've got to want to do it because you believe in your story. People don't go into directing for power. They go in for the completion of something they want to see. Dances needed a tone. Somebody else might not have done subtitles. I wanted to see it in the Native American language. Somebody else might have made it shorter, because they don't think people can sit with this movie. I think they can." Despite his independent streak, Costner still knew when to ask for help: friend and director Kevin Reynolds helped him film the difficult buffalo hunt scene. Reynolds, who gave Costner one of his first breaks with Fandango (1985) would direct him again in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), as well as the disastrous Waterworld (1995).

Some little known buffalo facts: 3500 were used in the production, with two of the tamed ones belonging to rocker Neil Young. And how do you get a buffalo to charge on film? Tempt him with Oreo cookies.

While Costner was inarguably the star of the show both in front and behind the camera, the supporting cast of Dances with Wolves are not to be overlooked: Mary McDonnell played his love interest, Stands With A Fist. Bringing a 20-year stage history to the production, McDonnell gained celluloid notice with the film, spurring her breakthrough performance a few years later with John Sayles' Passion Fish (1992). She earned Oscar® nominations for both roles. Graham Greene as holy man Kicking Bird had memorable roles later with Val Kilmer in Thunderheart (1992) and Mel Gibson in Maverick (1994). Character actors Robert Pastorelli and Maury Chaykin also contribute to the solid featured cast, with Pastorelli best remembered as Murphy Brown's housepainter on the long-running television series, and Chaykin portraying detective Nero Wolfe on the popular series of television films. Costner's own daughter Annie, then six years old, makes a brief appearance in a flashback sequence. SNL diehards might spot Charles Rocket in a small part; the actor was featured on the sketch comedy show for one season. And Wes Studi, who plays the villainous Pawnee Indian in Dances later played the cunning, malevolent Huron Indian in the 1992 remake of The Last of the Mohicans.

Producer: Bonnie Arnold, Kevin Costner, Jake Eberts, Derek Kavanagh, Jim Wilson
Director: Kevin Costner
Screenplay: Michael Blake
Cinematography: Dean Semler
Film Editing: William Hoy, Chip Masamitsu, Stephen Potter, Neil Travis
Art Direction: William Ladd Skinner
Music: John Barry, Peter Buffett
Cast: Kevin Costner (Lt. John Dunbar), Mary McDonnell (Stands With A Fist), Graham Greene (Kicking Bird), Rodney A. Grant (Wind In His Hair), Floyd 'Red Crow' Westerman (Ten Bears), Tantoo Cardinal (Black Shawl).
C-181m. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin
Dances With Wolves

Dances With Wolves

Leading man Kevin Costner made his directorial debut in 1990 with Dances with Wolves, the fictional tale of a despondent white man who regains his sense of purpose with a tribe of American Indians against the backdrop of the western frontier. The film was a hard sell: Westerns were not in vogue at the time, not to mention that Costner was insistent on keeping the running time at a potentially-lethal three hours as well as relying on the heavy use of subtitles. Accordingly, he was unable to secure any funding for the project through typical US channels, ultimately getting aid from a British investor and paying the rest out of his own pocket. The critics were kind but ultimately panned the offering as an exercise in self-indulgence: one remarked that Costner's Indian name would have been more accurate as "Obsesses with People Silhouetted Against Horizons." Concerns grew as budgets began to overflow and the shooting schedule continued to be extended; industry insiders tagged the project as "Kevin's Gate", referring to the infamous production catastrophe of Heaven's Gate (1980) ten years before. Despite all the ominous signs, Dances with Wolves opened to enthusiastic audiences, eventually grossing over 400 million in worldwide box office receipts. The film was nominated for twelve Academy Awards and won seven, including Best Picture and Best Director for Costner, beating out the critics' darling Goodfellas (1990) and its director, Martin Scorsese. The roots of Dances with Wolves were seeded 8 years earlier, with Costner's first screen credit, a largely forgettable offering titled Stacy's Knights (1983). The film's greatest contribution was the initial collaboration between Costner, the film's director, Jim Wilson, and the scriptwriter Michael Blake. In subsequent years, Wilson and Costner would create a production company and make seven films together, including Dances with Wilson in the producer's seat. Their continued friendship with Blake provided for an evening the writer spent at the Costner house several years later in which he first described the idea for Dances with Wolves in preparation for developing it as a screenplay. According to Blake from a 1990 Rolling Stone article, Costner was instantly attracted to the project but strongly urged the writer to write the story as a novel first versus a script. Blake obliged, producing a tome which thoroughly engaged Wilson and helped him visualize the story. Costner soon agreed, deeming the book, "the clearest idea of a movie I'd ever read." Although Blake always saw Costner in the director's chair, he had another actor in mind when writing the story: Viggo Mortensen, most recently of The Lord of the Rings trilogy fame. Blake explained, "I said, 'Kev, I don't know if anyone is going to really believe in you [in this part] after seeing your other movies.' And he said, 'Don't worry about it.' One thing I've learned about Kevin is that you do not bet against him, no matter what he's going to do. As it turns out, I think he's done some of his best acting work in this movie." As a first-time director, Costner impressed many not only with the ambitiousness of the epic project but his ability to handily pull it off: the project spanned a five-month shoot schedule on location in South Dakota with over 700 cast members and extras with temperatures ranging from a boiling 115 in the height of the summer months down to 20 degrees as the chilliness of Autumn set in. In a marked departure from a typical shoot, almost every scene (save the opening Civil War ones) were filmed in sequence. This was done in order to ensure weather realism from scene to scene, since so much of the action takes place outdoors. A tremendous amount of time and resources were allocated to the learning and delivery of the Lakota Sioux dialect, making Dances the first major feature film to use authentic Indian language onscreen with subtitles. Costner defended his atypical decisions with passion: "You've got to want to do it because you believe in your story. People don't go into directing for power. They go in for the completion of something they want to see. Dances needed a tone. Somebody else might not have done subtitles. I wanted to see it in the Native American language. Somebody else might have made it shorter, because they don't think people can sit with this movie. I think they can." Despite his independent streak, Costner still knew when to ask for help: friend and director Kevin Reynolds helped him film the difficult buffalo hunt scene. Reynolds, who gave Costner one of his first breaks with Fandango (1985) would direct him again in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), as well as the disastrous Waterworld (1995). Some little known buffalo facts: 3500 were used in the production, with two of the tamed ones belonging to rocker Neil Young. And how do you get a buffalo to charge on film? Tempt him with Oreo cookies. While Costner was inarguably the star of the show both in front and behind the camera, the supporting cast of Dances with Wolves are not to be overlooked: Mary McDonnell played his love interest, Stands With A Fist. Bringing a 20-year stage history to the production, McDonnell gained celluloid notice with the film, spurring her breakthrough performance a few years later with John Sayles' Passion Fish (1992). She earned Oscar® nominations for both roles. Graham Greene as holy man Kicking Bird had memorable roles later with Val Kilmer in Thunderheart (1992) and Mel Gibson in Maverick (1994). Character actors Robert Pastorelli and Maury Chaykin also contribute to the solid featured cast, with Pastorelli best remembered as Murphy Brown's housepainter on the long-running television series, and Chaykin portraying detective Nero Wolfe on the popular series of television films. Costner's own daughter Annie, then six years old, makes a brief appearance in a flashback sequence. SNL diehards might spot Charles Rocket in a small part; the actor was featured on the sketch comedy show for one season. And Wes Studi, who plays the villainous Pawnee Indian in Dances later played the cunning, malevolent Huron Indian in the 1992 remake of The Last of the Mohicans. Producer: Bonnie Arnold, Kevin Costner, Jake Eberts, Derek Kavanagh, Jim Wilson Director: Kevin Costner Screenplay: Michael Blake Cinematography: Dean Semler Film Editing: William Hoy, Chip Masamitsu, Stephen Potter, Neil Travis Art Direction: William Ladd Skinner Music: John Barry, Peter Buffett Cast: Kevin Costner (Lt. John Dunbar), Mary McDonnell (Stands With A Fist), Graham Greene (Kicking Bird), Rodney A. Grant (Wind In His Hair), Floyd 'Red Crow' Westerman (Ten Bears), Tantoo Cardinal (Black Shawl). C-181m. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)


Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49.

Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums.

In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons.

After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter.

by Michael T. Toole

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)

Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49. Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums. In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons. After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Kevin Costner won the Directors Guild of America's 1990 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1990) by the National Board of Review. Also cited for Best Director.

Limited Release in United States November 9, 1990

Released in United States Fall November 9, 1990

Wide Release in United States November 21, 1990

Released in United States on Video August 28, 1991

Re-released in United States on Video August 31, 1994

Re-released in United States on Video March 28, 1995

Released in United States February 1991

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 15-26, 1991.

Director Kevin Costner's original cut was 5 1/2 hours long.

Directorial debut for actor Kevin Costner.

Completed shooting November 21, 1989.

Began shooting July 17, 1989.

Extended special edition released in Paris May 6, 1992.

Extended special edition released in London December 6, 1991.

Expanded release in United Kingdom April 5, 1991.

Limited Release in United States November 9, 1990

Wide Release in United States November 21, 1990

Released in United States on Video August 28, 1991

Re-released in United States on Video August 31, 1994 (Limited Collector's Edition)

Re-released in United States on Video March 28, 1995 (Special Expanded Edition)

Released in United States February 1991 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 15-26, 1991.)

Released in United States Fall November 9, 1990

Nominated for a 1992 French Cesar award for Best Foreign Film.