The Cyclone Ranger


60m 1935

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 15, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Spectrum Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Spectrum Pictures Corp.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Film Length
5,382ft

Synopsis

The Pecos Kid, who is the leader of a band of cattle rustlers, shows his friend, Juan Castelar, a newspaper ad requesting information regarding Juan's whereabouts because his mother, Doña Castelar, is seriously ill. The ad was placed by Nita Garcia, whom Juan explains is his mother's ward. Juan tells Pecos that he ran away from home fifteen years before seeking adventure, but now it is time to return. Juan, Pecos and their friend, Pancho Gonzales, the Doña's servant who cares for Juan, agree to quit the gang and go to Juan's ranch in Mexico, where they will have a fresh start. Just then, Duke and other gang members arrive with Clem Rankin, a local loan shark whom they have kidnapped. Pecos is furious with Duke, telling him that the gang only rustles cattle and does not perpetrate violent crimes such as kidnapping or murder. Pecos orders Duke to free Rankin, after which he tells Duke that he is now the head of the gang. The three friends leave, but they are soon pursued by Sheriff Luke Saunders and his posse, who have been told about the kidnapping by Rankin. Juan is shot in the chase, and while Pecos and Pancho try to help him, Juan knows that they will not be able to elude capture with him holding them back. Juan commits suicide, and Pancho and Pecos sadly continue to the ranch to tell Doña Castelar the news. Once they arrive, however, they discover that the Doña is blind, and she mistakes Pecos for Juan as Juan had given him his ring. Nita also thinks Pecos is Juan, and the two former bandits do not have the heart to tell the truth to her or the kindly blind woman, who is overjoyed by her "son's" return. They settle into life on the ranch until one day Duke and his men appear. Duke tells the Doña and Nita that he is the Pecos Kid, and Pecos and Pancho are forced to go along with the charade. Duke wants to steal the ranch's cattle, but Pecos stalls him for a week, and when Duke complains about waiting, Pecos promises to give him the deposit for the cattle's sale after the roundup. That night, Duke steals the deposit money, and before Pecos and Pancho can apprehend him, they are captured by his men. At their hideout, Duke orders his men to raid the herd anyway. Pecos manages to escape, then returns to free Pancho. Meanwhile, Saunders arrives at the ranch house and shows Nita a wanted poster of Pecos, and tells her that the real Juan is dead. Pancho arrives and after telling him of Pecos' good intentions, asks for his help in catching Duke. Pancho promises that he and Pecos will return with Saunders to jail in exchange for his assistance, and the men and Nita ride to the rescue. They reach the herd, where Pecos is fighting with Duke. The gang is rounded up, and Duke is stabbed in the fight with Pecos. Saunders tears up the wanted poster and wishes Pecos good luck in his new life. Pecos promises to go straight, and he and Nita happily embrace.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 15, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Spectrum Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Spectrum Pictures Corp.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Film Length
5,382ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although there is a copyright statement on the opening title card of this film, the title is not listed in the copyright catalog. The onscreen credits of the print viewed include those for producer Ray Kirkwood, writer Oliver Drake and the cast; other credits were obtained from contemporary sources. Actress Soledad Jiménez' onscreen credit misspelled her name as "Solidad Jimines." According to a Film Daily news item, this was the second in a proposed series of eight westerns featuring Cody and his Arabian horse, "Chico." The plots of The Cyclone Ranger (see below) and the 1933 Western Star Productions picture Gun Law (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.1749), both of which were written by Oliver Drake, bear a striking resemblance to each other, although no information has been located to verify that the later picture was a remake of the earlier one. Modern sources include Herman Hack in the cast.