The Crying Game


2h 1992
The Crying Game

Brief Synopsis

A British soldier kidnapped by IRA terrorists befriends one of his captors.

Film Details

Also Known As
Crying Game, Juego de lágrimas, La moglie del soldato
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
1992
Production Company
British Screen Finance; Channel 4; Channel Four Television; Film4 Productions; Nippon Film Development & Finance Inc; Palace Pictures
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Live Home Video; MIRAMAX; Senator Film Verleih; Wild Bunch AG
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

Intriguing tale of a group of IRA kidnappers and the British soldier they nab and want to exchange for one of their own.

Crew

Brian Aldridge

Dressing Prop

Dave Allen

Construction Manager

Wendy Asher

Wardrobe Assistant (Irish Unit)

Mickey Bacon

Property Master

Brian Bassett

Carpenter (Irish Unit)

Miri Ben-shlomo

Assistant Makeup

Terry Blyther

Location Manager

Celia Bobak

Production Buyer

Victoria Boydell

2nd Assistant Editor

Paul Bradburn

Stand-By Prop

Ken Byrne

Other

Martin Childs

Set Decorator

Jim Clay

Production Designer

Gary Colkett

Electrician

Seamus Collins

2nd Assistant Director (Irish Unit)

Louis Conroy

Electrician (Irish Unit)

Tony Cook

Boom Operator

Paul Cowan

Line Producer

Paul Cowan

Associate Producer

Noel Cullen

Electrician (Irish Unit)

Clive Curtis

Stunt Coordinator

Sara Desmond

Unit Driver

Diana Dill

Script Supervisor

Anne Dudley

Music

Terry English

Unit Driver

Dave Escoffrey

Bestboy

Gemma Fallon

Production Manager (Irish Unit)

Susie Figgis

Casting

Gerry Floyd

Unit Driver

Edward Francis

Props

Peter Gallagher

Dressing Props (Irish Unit)

Brendan Galvin

Other

Paul Ghirardani

Assistant Art Director

Ken Hawkey

Other

Tom Hilton

Stills Photographer

Gary Hutchins

Camera Grip

Peter Hutchinson

Special Effects Supervisor

Patrick Isherwood

Production Accountant

Gerry Jones

Chief Hairstyles

Neil Jordan

Screenwriter

Elizabeth Karlsen

Co-Producer

John Karlsen

3rd Assistant Director

Melvin Lind

2nd Assistant Director

Sarah Lucraft

Assistant Production Accountant

John Mamon

Construction Manager (Irish Unit)

Paul Minter

Wardrobe Supervisor

Brian Mitchell

Standby Stagehand

Owen Monaghan

Dressing Props (Irish Unit)

Redmond Morris

1st Assistant Director

Terry Mulligan

Electrician (Irish Unit)

Con Murphey

Other

Colin Nicolson

Sound

Martin O'malley

Location Manager (Irish Unit)

James O'meara

Stagehand (Irish Unit)

Ricky Pattenden

Electrician

Rodney Pincott

Dressing Props/Storeman

Nik Powell

Executive Producer

Sandy Powell

Costume Designer

Robert Quinn

3rd Assistant Director (Irish Unit)

Brenda Rawn

Assistant (To Neil Jordan)

Martin Robinson

1st Assistant Editor

Morag Ross

Chief Makeup

Scott Rowlatt

Location Assistant

Bobby Scott

Other

Chris Seagers

Art Director

Michelle Sewell

Publicist

Norman Smith

Gaffer

Clare Spragge

Wardrobe Supervisor

Geoff Stephens

Song ("The Crying Game")

Fiona Traynor

Production Coordinator (Irish Unit)

Fran Triefus

Production Coordinator

Tommy Westbrook

Standby Carpenter

Ian Wilson

Director Of Photography

Polly Withers

Assistant (To Stephen Woolley)

Paul Wood

Electrician

Stephen Woolley

Producer

Andrew Zein

Production Runner

Film Details

Also Known As
Crying Game, Juego de lágrimas, La moglie del soldato
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Release Date
1992
Production Company
British Screen Finance; Channel 4; Channel Four Television; Film4 Productions; Nippon Film Development & Finance Inc; Palace Pictures
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Live Home Video; MIRAMAX; Senator Film Verleih; Wild Bunch AG
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Award Wins

Best Original Screenplay

1992

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1992
Stephen Rea

Best Director

1992
Neil Jordan

Best Editing

1992

Best Picture

1992

Best Supporting Actor

1992

Articles

The Crying Game


One of the most surprising success stories from the independent film boom of the 1990s, The Crying Game (1992) marked a major critical and commercial return to form for Irish director Neil Jordan. The filmmaker had earned plaudits for his earlier U.K.-based films like The Company of Wolves (1984) and Mona Lisa (1986), but a two-year stint in Hollywood resulted in only two films, High Spirits (1988) and We're No Angels (1989), neither of which received much attention.

The four-year interim before the release of The Crying Game in 1992 gave him time to finely hone his script and gradually drum up financing for the project, which was entitled The Soldier's Wife well into production. Jordan later revealed that his friend Stanley Kubrick encouraged him to change the title, with the one you know now taken from a 1964 pop single penned by Geoff Stephens and performed by Dave Berry. While the original standard is heard in the film, a newly-recorded cover version sung by Boy George and produced by Pet Shop Boys was used to promote the film and became a chart hit in its own right.

The film was initially ignored upon its original release in the U.K., where it was sold as a dark political thriller. The storyline proved a tough sell as well thanks to its nonjudgmental portrayal of Fergus (Jordan regular Stephen Rea), an IRA militant who kidnaps a British soldier, Jody (Forest Whitaker) with the aid of two compatriots, Jude (Miranda Richardson) and Maguire (Adrian Dunbar). After the plan goes awry, Fergus goes into hiding in London where, haunted by a photograph, he tracks down Jody's girlfriend, Dil (Jaye Davidson) and finds more than a few surprises in store.

Plot spoilers from this point are unavoidable, so if you haven't seen the film or have at least somehow managed to avoid hearing about the major reveal halfway into the film, just skip ahead two paragraphs. American distributor Miramax (who would be purchased the following year by Disney) revealed its marketing savvy once again by unveiling this film first at festivals, including a North American debut at Telluride, and then on a rollout basis in select cities with an emphasis on the tantalizing "secret." The enigmatic poster art of Richardson brandishing a pistol, coupled with rapidly accelerating word of mouth, turned the film into a major box office success as well as a pop culture sensation. In a welcome display of restraint, the revelation of Davidson's true gender was kept under wraps by both the media and the public throughout its theatrical run; perhaps even more surprisingly, the film's gender-bending twist played well even in states where the idea of running a gay-themed film would have been unimaginable at the time. Though the film wasn't explicitly acknowledged for breaking down barriers at the time, it clearly primed audiences for more adventurous fare with subsequent releases, most notably The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), drawing in mainstream audiences as well.

In fact, the big twist behind the film's marketing wasn't spilled en masse to the public until the Academy Awards the following year, when Davidson earned a nomination for Supporting Actor. (Needless to say, the choice of an appropriate film clip proved to be tricky.) The film also scored five other nominations, with Jordan winning for Writing (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) and, in his acceptance speech saying, "It was a difficult script to write. People said to me it was about characters that were unappealing and would be unappealing to audiences at large. But I think the way audiences have responded to this film has told me anyway that audiences have it in their hearts to embrace any range of characters and any range of points of view."

Since its release, the film has become part of the public vernacular with numerous imitations, parodies, and various references, while film scholars jumped on the chance to dissect its themes and references (including the oft-noted allusion to Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo [1958] in the names of the three main characters). Paradoxically, it has also continued to remain mysterious and highly durable over the ensuing years, rewarding repeated viewings with its emotional resonance, haunting atmosphere, and razor sharp performances. Even if you know the secret going in, there's nothing else quite like it.

By Nathaniel Thompson
The Crying Game

The Crying Game

One of the most surprising success stories from the independent film boom of the 1990s, The Crying Game (1992) marked a major critical and commercial return to form for Irish director Neil Jordan. The filmmaker had earned plaudits for his earlier U.K.-based films like The Company of Wolves (1984) and Mona Lisa (1986), but a two-year stint in Hollywood resulted in only two films, High Spirits (1988) and We're No Angels (1989), neither of which received much attention. The four-year interim before the release of The Crying Game in 1992 gave him time to finely hone his script and gradually drum up financing for the project, which was entitled The Soldier's Wife well into production. Jordan later revealed that his friend Stanley Kubrick encouraged him to change the title, with the one you know now taken from a 1964 pop single penned by Geoff Stephens and performed by Dave Berry. While the original standard is heard in the film, a newly-recorded cover version sung by Boy George and produced by Pet Shop Boys was used to promote the film and became a chart hit in its own right. The film was initially ignored upon its original release in the U.K., where it was sold as a dark political thriller. The storyline proved a tough sell as well thanks to its nonjudgmental portrayal of Fergus (Jordan regular Stephen Rea), an IRA militant who kidnaps a British soldier, Jody (Forest Whitaker) with the aid of two compatriots, Jude (Miranda Richardson) and Maguire (Adrian Dunbar). After the plan goes awry, Fergus goes into hiding in London where, haunted by a photograph, he tracks down Jody's girlfriend, Dil (Jaye Davidson) and finds more than a few surprises in store. Plot spoilers from this point are unavoidable, so if you haven't seen the film or have at least somehow managed to avoid hearing about the major reveal halfway into the film, just skip ahead two paragraphs. American distributor Miramax (who would be purchased the following year by Disney) revealed its marketing savvy once again by unveiling this film first at festivals, including a North American debut at Telluride, and then on a rollout basis in select cities with an emphasis on the tantalizing "secret." The enigmatic poster art of Richardson brandishing a pistol, coupled with rapidly accelerating word of mouth, turned the film into a major box office success as well as a pop culture sensation. In a welcome display of restraint, the revelation of Davidson's true gender was kept under wraps by both the media and the public throughout its theatrical run; perhaps even more surprisingly, the film's gender-bending twist played well even in states where the idea of running a gay-themed film would have been unimaginable at the time. Though the film wasn't explicitly acknowledged for breaking down barriers at the time, it clearly primed audiences for more adventurous fare with subsequent releases, most notably The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), drawing in mainstream audiences as well. In fact, the big twist behind the film's marketing wasn't spilled en masse to the public until the Academy Awards the following year, when Davidson earned a nomination for Supporting Actor. (Needless to say, the choice of an appropriate film clip proved to be tricky.) The film also scored five other nominations, with Jordan winning for Writing (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) and, in his acceptance speech saying, "It was a difficult script to write. People said to me it was about characters that were unappealing and would be unappealing to audiences at large. But I think the way audiences have responded to this film has told me anyway that audiences have it in their hearts to embrace any range of characters and any range of points of view." Since its release, the film has become part of the public vernacular with numerous imitations, parodies, and various references, while film scholars jumped on the chance to dissect its themes and references (including the oft-noted allusion to Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo [1958] in the names of the three main characters). Paradoxically, it has also continued to remain mysterious and highly durable over the ensuing years, rewarding repeated viewings with its emotional resonance, haunting atmosphere, and razor sharp performances. Even if you know the secret going in, there's nothing else quite like it. By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Began shooting November 3, 1991.

Jaye Davidson was named the most auspicious newcomer of the year by the National Board of Review (1992).

Released in United States Fall November 25, 1992

Limited Release in United States November 25, 1992

Expanded Release in United States December 18, 1992

Wide Release in United States February 19, 1993

Released in United States on Video July 7, 1993

Released in United States 1992 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 25 - October 11, 1992.)

Released in United States September 1992 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival September 4-7, 1992.)

Released in United States September 1992 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 10-19, 1992.)

Neil Jordan was cited for best screenplay by the Boston Society of Film Critics (1992).

Neil Jordan was cited for best screenplay by the New York Film Critics Circle (1992). Miranda Richardson was also named best supporting actress for her performances in "The Crying Game" (Great Britain/1992), "Damage" (Great Britain/1992) and "Enchanted April" (Great Britain/1991).

Neil Jordan was nominated for the Directors Guild of America's 1992 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Neil Jordan won the best original screenplay award from the Writers Guild of America (1992).

Stephen Rea was voted best actor by the National Society of Film Critics (1992).

Stephen Woolley won the 1992 Golden Laurel Award from the Producers Guild of America.

Released in United States Fall November 25, 1992

Limited Release in United States November 25, 1992

Expanded Release in United States December 18, 1992

Wide Release in United States February 19, 1993

Released in United States on Video July 7, 1993

Released in United States 1992

Released in United States September 1992

Released in United States 1993

Shown at New York Film Festival September 25 - October 11, 1992.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 10-19, 1992.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) September 1-12, 1992.

Frederick Elmes was cinematographer for a week of principal photography before Ian Wilson took over.

Producers Nik Powell and Stephen Woolley received a Felix for European Achievement of the Year at the 1993 European Film Awards.

First feature distributed by Eurotrustees, a European joint venture set up by Palace Pictures, BAC Films, Iberoamericana, Academy and Senator.

Completed shooting December 21, 1991.

Released in United States September 1992 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) September 1-12, 1992.)

Released in United States 1993 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Tribute to Miramax: Ten Years of Hits) June 10 ¿ July 1, 1993.)

Chosen as a finalist for best marketed film of 1993 by the Film Information Council.