Crocodile Dundee


1h 42m 1986

Brief Synopsis

An American reporter tracks down an Australian frontiersman and brings him back to the States.

Film Details

Also Known As
Crocodile Dundee, Crocodile Dundee - En storviltjägare i New York
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adventure
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Bluey; Featherdale Wildlife Park; Opticals & Graphics; Paramount Pictures; Rimfire Films
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; 20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; CBS Video; Hoyts Distribution; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Kakadoo National Park, Australia; Los Angeles, California, USA; Kakadu National Park, Australia; Queensland, Australia; Kakadoo National Park, Australia; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

An American reporter tracks down an Australian frontiersman and brings him back to the States.

Crew

Dale Aspin

Animal Handler (Dogs)

Max Aspin

Stunt Coordinator (Australia)

Michael Atkinson

Photography

Phillipa Banks

Art Department Coordinator (Australia)

Elizabeth Benjamin

Pre-Production Assistant (New York)

Peter Best

Music; Music Director

Craig Bolles

Assistant Director (Australia)

John Bowring

Other

Russell Boyd

Director Of Photography

Russell Boyd

Dp/Cinematographer

Doug Brady

Sound Recording (Music)

Peter Brown

Other

Steve Burgess

Post-Production Audio

Adrian Carr

Sound Editor (Dialogue/Australia)

Craig Carter

Sound Editor (Dialogue/Australia)

Tim Chau

Sound Effects Editor (Australia)

John Cornell

Screenwriter

John Cornell

Producer

Roger Cowland

Other

Bill Dalay

Sound Recording (New York)

Margaret Daley

Production Assistant (New York)

Clay Dear

Stunt Man (Paul Hogan)

Kevin Delaney

Location Assistant (New York)

Jordan Derwin

Stunt Man (Michael Lombard)

Kevin Dowd

Unit Manager (New York)

Alan Edwards

Helicopter Pilot (Australia)

Elizabeth Ann Fardon

Makeup (Australia)

A Farriss

Song ("Different World")

Julie Forster

Production Coordinator (Australia)

Eddie Gold

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit) (New York)

Graham Gow

Animal Handler (Snakes)

John Haddy

Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit) (Australia)

Bob Hall

Kakadu Liaison (Australia)

David Hardie

Special Effects (Australia)

Lisa Herth

Stand-In (Linda Kozlowski)

Jery Hewitt

Stunt Coordinator (New York)

Kim Hilder

Modelmaker (Australia)

Paul Hogan

Screenwriter

Paul Hogan

From Original Story

Paul Hogan

Story By

Terry Hopkins

Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit) (New York)

M Hutchence

Song ("Different World")

Louise Johnson

Sound Effects Editor (Australia)

Romaine Joseph

Other

Phil Judd

Post-Synchronization Effects Rerecording (Australia)

John Kerr

Production Assistant

John Kerr

Production Assistant

John Kerr

Production Assistant (New York)

Jon Kilik

Assistant Director (New York)

Mark Kyle

Animal Handler (Cattle)

Sebastian Lakosta

Storyboard Artist (Australia)

Bruce Lamshed

Sound Rerecording

Bruce Lamshed

Sound Effects Editor (Australia)

Ilene S Landress

Crafts Production Assistant (New York)

Joanne Laub

Sound Editor (Synching/New York)

Terry Lee

Helicopter Pilot (Australia)

Billy Malcolm

Scenic Artist (Australia)

Maggie Mckinney

Song Performer ("Only One Like You")

Andrew Mclean

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit) (Australia)

Peter Menzies

Camera Operator (Australia)

Nene Morgan

Base Office Liaison (Australia)

Norma Moriceau

Costume Design

John Murch

Modelmaker (Australia)

Chris Murray

Special Effects (Australia)

Martin O'neill

Set Decorator (Australia)

Philip A Patterson

Location Manager (Australia)

Philip A Patterson

Unit Manager (Australia)

Taylor Pattison

Set Dresser (New York)

Christina Pierce

Stunt Man (Linda Kozlowski)

Denise Pinckley

Production Coordinator (New York)

David Pomier

Location Manager (New York)

Steven Prestwich

Song ("Only One Like You")

Henry Rainger

Animal Handler (Buffalo)

Gretchen Rau

Set Decorator (New York)

Dave Rawlinson

Audio Consultant

Hugh Rawson

Key Production Assistant (New York)

Bob Rich

Production Associate (New York)

Roger Savage

Sound Rerecording (Australia)

Roger Savage

Sound Supervisor

Richard Schlesinger

Assistant Director

Richard Schlesinger

Assistant Director (New York)

Andrew Schmetterling

Sound Production Assistant (New York)

Jane Scott

Producer

Jane Scott

Line Producer

Ken Shadie

Screenwriter

Mark Silverman

Pre-Production Supervisor (New York)

Katrina Singer

Manager 2nd Unit (2nd Unit) (Australia)

Peter Sjoquist

Production Manager (Australia)

Peter Sjoquist

Post-Production Supervisor (Australia)

Greedy Smith

Songs ("Live It Up" "Sloppy Crocodile")

Trevor Smith

Music Consultant (Australia)

Andrew Steuart

Other

David Stiven

Editor

Mark Turnbull

Assistant Director

Kelly Van Horn

Production Manager (New York)

P.j. Voeten

Assistant Director (Australia)

Graham Walker

Production Designer

Robert Wess

Stunt Man (Reginald Veljohnson)

Geoff Wharton

Other

Carla White

Makeup (New York)

Karin Whittington

Sound Editor (Dialogue/Australia)

Gary Wilkins

Sound Recording (Australia)

Diedre Williams

Wardrobe Supervisor (New York)

John Wood

Other

Steve Wright

Set Dresser (New York)

Wayne Young

Associate Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Crocodile Dundee, Crocodile Dundee - En storviltjägare i New York
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adventure
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Bluey; Featherdale Wildlife Park; Opticals & Graphics; Paramount Pictures; Rimfire Films
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; 20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; CBS Video; Hoyts Distribution; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Kakadoo National Park, Australia; Los Angeles, California, USA; Kakadu National Park, Australia; Queensland, Australia; Kakadoo National Park, Australia; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Award Nominations

Best Original Screenplay

1986

Articles

Crocodile Dundee


Paul Hogan was already a celebrity on the small screen in 1986 when Crocodile Dundee first went into release; his long-running television show The Hogan Show had made him a star in his native Down Under, and American viewers were delighted with his commercials promoting Australian tourism with the inimitable catchphrase, "Put another shrimp on the barbie." His big screen debut, however, would exceed all expectations: Crocodile Dundee grossed over $328 million and remains the most successful Australian film ever made. The common fish-out-of-water scenario was given a new twist by the charismatic Hogan as the gritty outbacker Mick "Crocodile" Dundee, at ease in the wilds of Australia, who soon finds himself in the middle of New York City with only a cosmopolitan female journalist as his guide. Hogan was inspired to create the character after his first trip to the Big Apple. In an interview, he explained, "I found it a bit dazzling, as anyone who's been to New York will..it's just too many people moving too fast, it's too big and noisy, so everyone goes frantic and gets on and hustles. . . I started to write it as more like the character I played on television, and then I made him more woodsy, more 'outbacky'..eventually became Crocodile Dundee. . . It was also set out to make it more of a romance between the two extremes of civilization: a sophisticated New Yorker and an Aussie outback character."

Hogan's appeal was based in his authenticity as a down-to-earth wisecracker. He was working as a rigger on the Sydney Harbor Bridge in 1972 when his coworkers dared him to try out for a talent show in which contestants were invariably roasted by the semi-celebrity panel. Posing as a "tap-dancing knife thrower and part-time shearer," Hogan got on the show only to turn the tables on the panel members, humiliating them and delighting audiences. He soon had his own sketch-comedy show, which ran for an impressive eleven years, establishing him as an Aussie household name.

For Dundee, Hogan employed some familiar help for behind the scenes: director Peter Faiman also helmed The Hogan Show, and screenplay collaborator John Cornell acted in and produced the show. Ken Shadie, another screenwriter, also wrote for the television series.

Unknown actress and Julliard graduate Linda Kozlowski was cast as the feisty reporter Sue Charlton. She and Hogan made headlines when their onscreen romance became a real-life one: Paul divorced his long-time wife and married Kozlowski in 1990. The pair would go on to make four films together, including Crocodile Dundee II (1988) and Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001), sequels that were never able to match the success of the original. On working with his wife, the always frank Hogan once observed, "They back-chat you a little more than a normal actress would." Reginald VelJohnson played Gus the NY chauffeur, who notably brandishes the limo antennae as a villain-stopping boomerang. VelJohnson was best known as the father Carl Winslow on the television series Family Matters and Bruce Willis' cop sidekick in Die Hard (1988). Australian wrestling star Steve Rackman played the hulking brute Donk, and Paul's son Brett Hogan even has a bit role in Dundee as "Peter (Roo Shooter)." The star of the show, however, was Hogan: he won a Golden Globe for his comedic performance and Dundee was nominated for a 1987 Best Original Screenplay Oscar®. Of the Academy Awards, Hogan mused, "There are three Gs to accepting an award: Be Gracious. . . Be Grateful . . . and Get Off!" He did not, however, get a chance to test out his theory: Woody Allen won for Hannah and Her Sisters (1986).

When pressed for the most difficult co-star to work with, Hogan had a quick answer: "Buffalo. 'Cause if the buffalo doesn't want to do anything, it weighs 2,000 pounds and you know, it doesn't. So you have to hang around. . . It's like he said, 'I'll just sit here.' And you can't do anything about it." Of course, getting the buffalo to lie down, as shown in the film, is another matter: you just have to drug it. Eagle-eyed viewers might recognize the film playing on the television in Hogan's Manhattan hotel room: Peckinpah's Major Dundee (1965). And although Hogan's Mick Dundee was the actor's own invention, he did have an inspiration for the visuals: "He was the first croc hunter I ever met, back in the 70's: his name was Jacko. He had the black hat with the teeth in it and the sleeveless vest, but he was also filthy, tattooed, and sort of toothless. He had all the charm of a cobra, you know, he was a croc hunter."

Producer: John Cornell
Director: Peter Faiman
Screenplay: John Cornell, Paul Hogan, Ken Shadie
Cinematography: Russell Boyd
Film Editing: David Stiven
Art Direction: Graham Walker
Music: Peter Best, Martin Plaza, Greedy Smith
Cast: Paul Hogan (Michael J. 'Crocodile' Dundee), Linda Kozlowski (Sue Charlton), John Meillon (Walter Reilly), David Gulpilil (Neville Bell), Ritchie Singer (Con), Maggie Blinco (Ida).
C-98m. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin
Crocodile Dundee

Crocodile Dundee

Paul Hogan was already a celebrity on the small screen in 1986 when Crocodile Dundee first went into release; his long-running television show The Hogan Show had made him a star in his native Down Under, and American viewers were delighted with his commercials promoting Australian tourism with the inimitable catchphrase, "Put another shrimp on the barbie." His big screen debut, however, would exceed all expectations: Crocodile Dundee grossed over $328 million and remains the most successful Australian film ever made. The common fish-out-of-water scenario was given a new twist by the charismatic Hogan as the gritty outbacker Mick "Crocodile" Dundee, at ease in the wilds of Australia, who soon finds himself in the middle of New York City with only a cosmopolitan female journalist as his guide. Hogan was inspired to create the character after his first trip to the Big Apple. In an interview, he explained, "I found it a bit dazzling, as anyone who's been to New York will..it's just too many people moving too fast, it's too big and noisy, so everyone goes frantic and gets on and hustles. . . I started to write it as more like the character I played on television, and then I made him more woodsy, more 'outbacky'..eventually became Crocodile Dundee. . . It was also set out to make it more of a romance between the two extremes of civilization: a sophisticated New Yorker and an Aussie outback character." Hogan's appeal was based in his authenticity as a down-to-earth wisecracker. He was working as a rigger on the Sydney Harbor Bridge in 1972 when his coworkers dared him to try out for a talent show in which contestants were invariably roasted by the semi-celebrity panel. Posing as a "tap-dancing knife thrower and part-time shearer," Hogan got on the show only to turn the tables on the panel members, humiliating them and delighting audiences. He soon had his own sketch-comedy show, which ran for an impressive eleven years, establishing him as an Aussie household name. For Dundee, Hogan employed some familiar help for behind the scenes: director Peter Faiman also helmed The Hogan Show, and screenplay collaborator John Cornell acted in and produced the show. Ken Shadie, another screenwriter, also wrote for the television series. Unknown actress and Julliard graduate Linda Kozlowski was cast as the feisty reporter Sue Charlton. She and Hogan made headlines when their onscreen romance became a real-life one: Paul divorced his long-time wife and married Kozlowski in 1990. The pair would go on to make four films together, including Crocodile Dundee II (1988) and Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001), sequels that were never able to match the success of the original. On working with his wife, the always frank Hogan once observed, "They back-chat you a little more than a normal actress would." Reginald VelJohnson played Gus the NY chauffeur, who notably brandishes the limo antennae as a villain-stopping boomerang. VelJohnson was best known as the father Carl Winslow on the television series Family Matters and Bruce Willis' cop sidekick in Die Hard (1988). Australian wrestling star Steve Rackman played the hulking brute Donk, and Paul's son Brett Hogan even has a bit role in Dundee as "Peter (Roo Shooter)." The star of the show, however, was Hogan: he won a Golden Globe for his comedic performance and Dundee was nominated for a 1987 Best Original Screenplay Oscar®. Of the Academy Awards, Hogan mused, "There are three Gs to accepting an award: Be Gracious. . . Be Grateful . . . and Get Off!" He did not, however, get a chance to test out his theory: Woody Allen won for Hannah and Her Sisters (1986). When pressed for the most difficult co-star to work with, Hogan had a quick answer: "Buffalo. 'Cause if the buffalo doesn't want to do anything, it weighs 2,000 pounds and you know, it doesn't. So you have to hang around. . . It's like he said, 'I'll just sit here.' And you can't do anything about it." Of course, getting the buffalo to lie down, as shown in the film, is another matter: you just have to drug it. Eagle-eyed viewers might recognize the film playing on the television in Hogan's Manhattan hotel room: Peckinpah's Major Dundee (1965). And although Hogan's Mick Dundee was the actor's own invention, he did have an inspiration for the visuals: "He was the first croc hunter I ever met, back in the 70's: his name was Jacko. He had the black hat with the teeth in it and the sleeveless vest, but he was also filthy, tattooed, and sort of toothless. He had all the charm of a cobra, you know, he was a croc hunter." Producer: John Cornell Director: Peter Faiman Screenplay: John Cornell, Paul Hogan, Ken Shadie Cinematography: Russell Boyd Film Editing: David Stiven Art Direction: Graham Walker Music: Peter Best, Martin Plaza, Greedy Smith Cast: Paul Hogan (Michael J. 'Crocodile' Dundee), Linda Kozlowski (Sue Charlton), John Meillon (Walter Reilly), David Gulpilil (Neville Bell), Ritchie Singer (Con), Maggie Blinco (Ida). C-98m. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 26, 1986

Released in United States on Video August 1987

Released in United States on Video August 1, 1987

Film debut for writer Ken Shadie.

Released in United States Fall September 26, 1986

Released in United States on Video August 1987

Released in United States on Video August 1, 1987