Crashing Las Vegas


1h 2m 1956
Crashing Las Vegas

Brief Synopsis

When an electric shock turns one of them into a psychic, the Bowery Boys invade Las Vegas.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Release Date
Apr 22, 1956
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

When New York boardinghouse landlady Mrs. Kate Kelly is given her notice after more than thirty years, her tenants and friends, Slip Mahoney and Sach Jones, determine to help her buy the building, even though they are broke. Just after the bumbling Sach gets a strong shock from an electric plug, their friends Butch and Chuck arrive with four free tickets to the "Live Like a King" quiz program. Hoping to get a chance to win some money, the boys go to the show that afternoon. Winners are determined by a spin of a wheel of fortune, and Sach, who has been seeing numbers in his head since the shock, accurately predicts what the first several winning seat numbers will be.

By bullying another member of the audience into vacating seat number 87, Slip wins the prize when that number is called. Slip's three friends demand to share the prize, so Slip convinces the program emcee to change the prize from four luxurious weeks in Las Vegas for one to one week for four. After being flown to Las Vegas and checking into their hotel, Sach decides to bet a quarter on the roulette wheel. He repeatedly wins, amassing a large amount of money, but loses it all after stepping away from the table. Slip then gives him another quarter, and Sach wins even more money, attracting the attention of fortune hunter Carol LaRue and her two cohorts, Oggy and Sam, who think Sach has a system and want to find out what it is. The next day, Sach introduces his friends to Carol, who relates that Sach saved her life in the swimming pool.

When Carol tells Sach that she came to Las Vegas to win money for her mother's operation, he boasts that he can help her but loses her last two hundred dollars when he fails to predict the winning numbers on the roulette wheel. After she angrily leaves him in the casino, Sach confesses to Slip that when she was with him, he could not think of anything but her, then quickly wins enough money to close down the wheel. Later, Carol, Oggy and Sam determine to cheat Sach out of his winnings and devise a plan that involves another cohort, Tony. Next morning, Carol calls Sach and apologizes, asking to see him again.

At breakfast, Slip says that they now have enough money for Mrs. Kelly but suggests that Sach try some of the other casinos to win something for their "reclining" years. Because a picture of Sach and a story about his luck appears in the morning newspaper, though, they realize that no other casino will let him gamble and decide to go home after a night out on the town. When Carol meets Sach at one of the clubs that night, she convinces him to sneak off with her. When Slip, Butch and Chuck later go looking for Sach, they find a recording device that Tony has planted in his room and assume that Sach has been kidnapped. While they call the police to report Sach's disappearance, Carol takes Sach to her "penthouse" apartment. Unknown to the naïve Sach, Tony, Sam and Oggy trick him into believing he is riding the elevator to the twenty-first floor, when, in fact, they never leave the first floor. Once inside Carol's apartment, she makes a play for him until Tony, who she says is her husband, angrily bursts through the door. Tony then scuffles with Sach and leaps out the open window, making Sach think that he is responsible for Tony's death.

Now Oggy, who accompanied Tony, pretends to call the police to a report a murder, but Sach rushes out of the room, gets into the elevator and exits after what he thinks is 21 floors. Outside, he sees Tony's "body" on the ground then hides in a nearby car, not knowing that it is a police car. When Sach hears a radio report that the police are looking for him, he mistakenly believes that they want him for the murder of Carol's husband. He then makes his way back to his own hotel room and hides in the closet when he hears his three friends come in. Overhearing Slip talk to the police using the words "murder" and "conviction," Sach, still convinced that that he is a fugitive, faints. While unconscious, he dreams that the hotel floor manager is a judge who sentences Sach, Slip, Butch and Chuck to execution in the electric chair. As Sach starts to scream in his sleep, the boys overhear him and open the door. After Slip and Sach exchange stories, Slip guesses that the "murder" was a setup and goes to find a lawyer.

After he leaves, Carol and Oggy arrive and suggest to Sach that they could make a deal if he tells them what his system is. Although they do not believe him when he says he does not have one, they leave when he offers them his suitcase full of money. Moments later, Slip returns and when Sach explains what happened to the money, Slip reveals that the police have confirmed that there has been no murder. To get Sach's money back, the boys all go to Carol's apartment, which they learn is on the first floor, and search the premises. As they are searching the bedroom, Oggy and his cohorts arrive with the suitacse. A fight ensues after Sach sees Tony and realizes that he did not kill anyone. Soon all three thugs are knocked out, as is Sach, who awakens and accidentally turns on a fan that blows all of the money out of Carol's window. When he tries to unplug the fan, Sach gets another electric shock that makes him lose his ability to visualize numbers. Back at their hotel, the disheartened Sach and Slip are cheered by a call from Mrs. Kelly, who has come to look after them, but wind up in a fight when Sach incorrectly guesses her room number.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Release Date
Apr 22, 1956
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Articles

Crashing Las Vegas -


Allied Artists' 41st Bowery Boys film shows the series formula all but worn out. The 'boys' had stopped being juvenile delinquents headquartered in a basement, and the stories were reduced to the same elements. Huntz Hall's 'Sach' Jones invariably picks up some fantastic ability for Leo Gorcey's 'Slip' Mahoney to exploit, while Gorcey's diminutive father Bernard provides extra comic relief as Louie, the owner of the candy store where the Boys congregate. Leo Gorcey owned 40% of the series and controlled its content; for the most part the other gang members were reduced to small supporting roles. In Crashing Las Vegas (1956) Sach discovers that he can predict gambling numbers, leading to the expected tangles with casino gangsters and kidnappings. But Crashing Las Vegas turned out to be a major turning point for the series. Bernard Gorcey was killed in an auto accident just before filming was to begin. A negligent father when Leo and his brother were young, Bernard reconciled with them as teenagers and encouraged them to try out for the Broadway play of Dead End, which was the beginning of twenty years of full employment for all and stardom for Leo. Despondent over losing his father, Leo threw a drunken tantrum on the sound stage of Crashing Las Vegas, and destroyed the set in a rage. After making demands for more money, he quit his own series and never again played a leading role. For the next film Fighting Trouble (1956), the ground rules would have to be entirely reworked.

By Glenn Erickson
Crashing Las Vegas -

Crashing Las Vegas -

Allied Artists' 41st Bowery Boys film shows the series formula all but worn out. The 'boys' had stopped being juvenile delinquents headquartered in a basement, and the stories were reduced to the same elements. Huntz Hall's 'Sach' Jones invariably picks up some fantastic ability for Leo Gorcey's 'Slip' Mahoney to exploit, while Gorcey's diminutive father Bernard provides extra comic relief as Louie, the owner of the candy store where the Boys congregate. Leo Gorcey owned 40% of the series and controlled its content; for the most part the other gang members were reduced to small supporting roles. In Crashing Las Vegas (1956) Sach discovers that he can predict gambling numbers, leading to the expected tangles with casino gangsters and kidnappings. But Crashing Las Vegas turned out to be a major turning point for the series. Bernard Gorcey was killed in an auto accident just before filming was to begin. A negligent father when Leo and his brother were young, Bernard reconciled with them as teenagers and encouraged them to try out for the Broadway play of Dead End, which was the beginning of twenty years of full employment for all and stardom for Leo. Despondent over losing his father, Leo threw a drunken tantrum on the sound stage of Crashing Las Vegas, and destroyed the set in a rage. After making demands for more money, he quit his own series and never again played a leading role. For the next film Fighting Trouble (1956), the ground rules would have to be entirely reworked. By Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

This was the first film that Leo Gorcey made after the death of his father Bernard Gorcey (who played Louis). Leo left the series and this became his last starring role.

Notes

The opening title card of the film reads: "Allied Artists Pictures Corporation Presents Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall and The Bowery Boys in Crashing Las Vegas." Set decorator Victor Gangelin's surname is misspelled "Ganglin" in the onscreen credits. Some contemporary sources refer to actor David Condon by his real name, David Gorcey. He was the brother of Leo Gorcey and also a longtime cast member in the series. Although copyright records list actress Minerva Urecal as "Mrs. Kelly," the role was played by Doris Kemper, and Urecal did not appear in the film. Copyright records also credit Augie Lohman with Special effects and Emil LaVigne with Makeup, but onscreen credits list Ray Mercer and Frank McCoy, respectively in those capacities. It has not been determined if Lohman and LaVigne, who both worked on many other films in "The Bowery Boys" series, also worked on Crashing Las Vegas or were replaced.
       Crashing Las Vegas marked Leo Gorcey's last major film appearance and his last appearance in the series. After leaving the series, Gorcey's only film appearances were brief cameos in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World in 1963 and The Phynx (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70), released in 1970 but made before Gorcey's 1969 death at age 54. Some modern sources have speculated that Gorcey left the series because of the death of his father, Bernard Gorcey, who appeared in many of "The Bowery Boys" films as "Louie Dumbrowski," and whose last film was the previous entry in the series, Bowery to Bagdad. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry for Live Wires in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50.