The Couch Trip


1h 38m 1988

Brief Synopsis

An escaped mental patient claims to be a famous shrink and lands a gig as a radio psychologist.

Film Details

Also Known As
Couch Trip, Titta vi rymmer
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Daniel P Church
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

An escaped mental patient claims to be a famous shrink and lands a gig as a radio psychologist.

Crew

Gale Adler

Photography

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

James Alexander

Sound Mixer

Matthew Alper

Assistant Camera Operator

Alicia Anthony

Production Auditor

Byron Eugene Ashbrook

Boom Operator

Sandina Bailo-lape

Sound Editor

Barry Bedig

Property Master

Tom Bellfort

Sound Editor

Laurin J Benson

Grip

David Bergad

Sound

Jimmie Bly

Production Designer

Gloria S Borders

Sound Editor

Robin Borman-wizan

Costumes

James T Boyle

Gaffer

Linda Brachman

Production Assistant

Joan Marie Bursler

Other

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Pamela Cederquist

Production Coordinator

Ken Chase

Makeup

Leo Chavez

Grip

Michael Chavez

Camera Assistant

Richard Chirco

Swing Gang

Daniel P Church

Cable Operator

Richard Church

Sound Mixer

Jerry Cipperley

Transportation Captain

Pat Clark

Boom Operator

Stan Cockerell

Property Master Assistant

Bruce Cohen

Assistant Director

Michel Colombier

Music

Eddie Cooley

Song

Christine Cramer

Production Assistant

John Davenport

Song

Peter Davidian

Best Boy

Cariline Davis-dyer

Continuity

Melissa Deitz

Sound

Karin Dew

Animal Trainer

Nick Dimitri

Stunts

Jann Dutmer

Assistant Director

Pamela Easley

Post-Production Supervisor

Gary Fettis

Set Decorator

Clare Freeman

Sound

James A Garrett

Assistant Editor

Ralph Garrett

Stunts

Carl Gibson

Grip

Brian C Glover

Camera

Daniel C Gold

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Goldsby

Production Assistant

Larry Gordon

Producer

Jerry Grandey

Assistant Director

Bob Hagans

Color Timer

Robert S Hahn

Camera Operator

Richard A Harris

Editor

Jim Henrikson

Music Editor

Richard Hymns

Sound Editor

Fred Inman

Other

Ronald A Jacobs

Sound Editor

Chris Johnson

Production Assistant

Mike Johnson

Stunts

Tom Johnson

Sound

Susan V Kalinowski

Hair

Steven Kampmann

Screenplay

Mitchell Kaplan

Other

Harriet Katz

Accounting Assistant

Frank J Keever

Grip

Harry Kohoyda

Production Auditor

Ken Kolb

Source Material (From Novel)

Robert Lattanzio

Other

Jack Leahy

Sound

Jay Lee

Production Assistant

Tom Mack

Assistant Director

Tom Mack

Associate Producer

Eddie Marks

Costume Supervisor

George Mcdowell

Liaison

Peter Mckernan

Pilot

Steve Mclean

Assistant Camera Operator

Brian D Mills

Grip

Jim Mills

Other

Paul Mindrup

Camera Assistant

Will M Mitchell

Swing Gang

Patricia Mock

Casting

John Moio

Stunts

Edward R. Nedin

Electrician

Suzanne Nupoff

Assistant

Craig Pinkard

Transportation Coordinator

Rudy G Pohlert

Electrician

Will Porter

Screenplay

Hillary Anne Ripps

Other

George N Robotham

Stunts

Ira Stanley Rosenstein

Assistant Director

Tim Ryan

Key Grip

Tom Sachs

Production

Tom Schurke

Video Playback

Robert Shoup

Sound Editor

Stephen P Shubin

Costumes

Chris Squires

Camera Operator

Paul Stader

Stunts

Sean Stein

Screenplay

Brian Steward

Production Assistant

Lonnie Stewart

Dolly Grip

George Stokes

Construction Coordinator

Chuck A. Tamburro

Other

Michael Tamburro

Pilot

Randy Thom

Sound

Robert C. Thomas

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert C. Thomas

Director Of Photography

Donald E. Thorin

Dp/Cinematographer

Donald E. Thorin

Director Of Photography

Jeffrey S Thorin

Assistant Camera Operator

Dennie Thorpe

Foley Artist

Kellett Tighe

Assistant

Chuck Waters

Stunt Coordinator

Gordan A Webb

Coproducer

Gordon A Webb

Production Manager

Cliff Wenger

Special Effects Coordinator

Neil Wenger

Assistant Editor

George Wilbur

Stunts

Jim Winburn

Stunts

Frank Wolf

Music

Sandi Yunt

Assistant

Donald N Zuckerman

Craft Service

Film Details

Also Known As
Couch Trip, Titta vi rymmer
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Daniel P Church
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video June 23, 1988

Released in United States Winter January 15, 1988

Began shooting February 6, 1987.

Completed shooting May 1987.

Released in United States Winter January 15, 1988

Released in United States on Video June 23, 1988