Class of 1984


1h 38m 1982
Class of 1984

Brief Synopsis

A new teacher arrives in a city high school run by a punk rock posse.

Film Details

Also Known As
Class of '84
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Film Opticals Of Canada (Toronto)
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

A new teacher arrives in a city high school run by a punk rock posse.

Crew

Roy T Anderson

Stunts

Jeff Baxter

Song Performer ("Suburbanite")

Jeff Baxter

Song ("You Better Not Step Out Of Line")

Paul F. Birkett

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Libby Bowden

Assistant Director

Jacques M Bradette

Set Decorator

Randall Bramlett

Song Performer ("You Better Not Step Out Of Line")

Lutz Brode

Stunts

Ken Brooke

Makeup

Desmond Campbell

Stunts

Shane Cardwell

Stunts

Bruce Carwardine

Sound Effects Editor

Courtney Chang

Stunts

Colin Chilvers

Special Effects

Simon Clery

Production Assistant

Alice Cooper

Song

Alice Cooper

Song Performer ("I Am The Future")

Peter Cox

Stunts

Carol Davidson

Makeup

Ted Dentray

Stunts

Bert Dunk

Director Of Photography

Timothy Eaton

Assistant Editor

Rick Forsayeth

Stunts

Glen Gauthier

Sound Editor

Gary Gegan

Assistant Editor

Patricia Green

Makeup

Austin Grimaldi

Sound Rerecording

Joe Grimaldi

Sound Rerecording

Robert Hannah

Stunt Coordinator

Robert Hannah

Stunts

Kim Hansen

Stunts

David Hart

Production Assistant

Angela Heald

Production Coordinator

Tom Holland

Screenwriter

Tom Holland

From Story

Geoff Holmes

Art Direction

Lynn Jemison

Production Assistant

Eddie Karam

Original Music

Barbara Kelly

Location Manager

Arthur Kent

Producer

Arthur Kent

Producer

Lee Knippelberg

Assistant Director

Gary Kunin

Assistant Editor

Howard Kunin

Editor Supervisor

Howard Kunin

Editor

Joanne Lang-hannah

Stunts

Terry Leonard

Production Assistant

Terry Leonard

Production Assistant

Mark L. Lester

Executive Producer

Mark L. Lester

Screenwriter

Tony Lucibello

Assistant Director

Lynne Mackay

Costumes

Martin Malivoire

Special Effects

Henry Mancini

Song ("Moon River")

Heather Mcintosh

Production Controller

Nadia Ongaro

Wardrobe

Harald Ortenburger

Camera Operator

Gary Osborne

Songs ("I Am The Future" "You Better Not Step Out Of Line")

David Earl Pamplin

Stunts

Kevin Pamplin

Stunts

Jayme S Parker

Sound Editor Supervisor

Darryl Phillip

Stunts

Branko Racki

Stunts

Robert Reece

Stunts

Florent Retz

Assistant Editor

David Rigby

Stunts

Hilton Rosemarin

Set Decorator

Merrie Lynn Ross

Executive Producer

Robert Saad

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

John Saxton

Screenwriter

Lalo Schifrin

Music

Lalo Schifrin

Songs ("I Am The Future" "Suburbanite" "You Better Not Step Out Of Line")

Derf Scratch

Songs ("Fresh Flesh" "Let'S Have A War")

Peter Shewchuk

Sound Recording

Marilyn Stonehouse

Production Manager

Barry Swatuk

Stunts

Peter Thillaye

Sound Effects Editor

Matt Tundo

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Tim Van Patten

Music ("Stegman'S Concerto")

Lee Ving

Songs ("Fresh Flesh" "Let'S Have A War")

Ted Watkins

Art Direction

Dany White

Stunts

William White

Stunts

Mark Bryan Wilson

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Class of '84
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Film Opticals Of Canada (Toronto)
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

The Class of 1984 -


Everybody loves a deadline, especially when the Big Moment is pinned to a particularly scary year. Those with an investment in Mayan prophesy sweated out the twelvemonth of 2012 waiting for an apocalypse that never reared its head, apparently having learned little from the pointless Y2K anxiety that attended the turn of the 21st Century in the year 2000, which led the gullible to expect a global grid shutdown. Due exclusively to the persuasive writing skills of George Orwell, 1984 was anticipated with queasy stomachs and alarmist bloviation long before the first of that year. British filmmaker Michael Radford adapted the 1949 novel 1984 for release in cinemas in the year in which Orwell's dystopian vision laid its action - but two years earlier, and on the other end of the prestige spectrum, drive-in auteur Mark L. Lester had beaten Radford to the punch with the disruptive punk aesthetics of The Class of 1984 (1982).

A DIY self-actualizer who had made the gearhead classic Steel Arena (1973) - focusing on the white knuckle exploits of death-defying stunt drivers - on his own dime and went on to craft the drive-in perennials Truck Stop Women (1974), Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw (1976), and Roller Boogie (1979), Lester was inspired to write Class of 1984 after noting that his old high school in the San Fernando Valley community of North Hills had been overrun by youth gangs. "I began doing enormous amounts of research," Lester told the horror website Dread Central in April of 2015. "And I found that there were all these incidents of violence in the schools - and this was way before Columbine... So all of these things - gang fights, prostitutes, drugs, and there was even a teacher who had come to class with a gun... So I put all the incidents together, with a Blackboard Jungle type-story where all of this comes to an urban high school, and that's how it all started."

Lester was able to cast his first choice to play an idealistic school teacher crushed by the axis of administrative incompetence and student hostility in Perry King. Like Lester, a native Ohioan, King's film career had begun in earnest a decade earlier with key roles in George Roy Hill's Slaughterhouse Five (1972) and Waris Hussein's The Possession of Joel Delaney (1972), and as one of the rising stars of Martin Davidson and Stephen Verona's The Lord's of Flatbush (1974) opposite Sylvester Stallone and Henry Winkler. The actor was by this point transitioning from youthful leading man roles to playing more mature characters, a career trajectory that would lead to the fleet of military men, senators, congressmen, and presidents he would portray in a career spanning more than forty years. With a shooting location secured in affordable Toronto, Lester would fill his supporting cast with Canadian actors, while bringing along with him a couple of Hollywood players -- Roddy McDowall, as a sensitive school teacher who cracks under the strain; Timothy Van Patten (then coming off a long run as a regular on TV's high school-set The White Shadow) as the leader of the school gang; and a fresh-faced Canadian-born actor named Michael Fox, whose later success on American television would necessitate the adoption of the professional name Michael J. Fox.

Born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1961 and raised in British Columbia, Fox got started young in theatre and had made sufficient gains on Canadian television to effect a career move at age 18 to Hollywood. Parts on such American TV series as Lou Grant and Trapper John, M.D., as well as a role in Walt Disney's Midnight Madness (1980), were encouraging, but by the time he accepted a minor role in Class of 1984 Fox was giving serious thought to returning to Canada for good. Shortly after completing the Lester film, Fox auditioned for the NBC sitcom Family Ties, whose pilot episode aired in September 1982, a month after the theatrical rollout of Class of 1984. A perfect fit for the comic relief role of teen neoconservative Alex Keaton, Fox parlayed his small screen success into a run of profitable feature films, most notably Robert Zemeckis' sci-fi comedy Back to the Future (1985) and its sequels. Twenty years after having lost out on the Timothy Hutton role in Ordinary People (1980) and having had to settle for Class of 1984 (which the actor cracked, in his 2003 memoirs, made "Midnight Madness look like Casablanca"), Fox received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Drawing inspiration from Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971), writer/director Mark L. Lester would graft then-voguish punk rock fashions onto the high school hooligans of Class of 1984, tapping a zeitgeist that had long since left the building but was experiencing renewed currency among suburban youths. Though the punk rock movement was considered by purists to be near death by 1981 (Sex Pistols frontman Sid Vicious had died two years earlier), Lester's use of Mohawk haircuts, distressed denim, and studded leather was predictive of a number of films that followed, from Susan Seidelman's Smithereens (1982) and Penelope Spheeris' Suburbia (1983) to Alex Cox's Repo Man (1984) and Dan O'Bannon's The Return of the Living Dead (1985); in Star Trek: The Journey Home (1986), the crew of the SS Enterprise beams down in 20th Century San Francisco, where Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock is moved to use the Vulcan nerve pinch on a punk commuter who will not turn down the volume on his boogie box. Like Fox, Lester would enjoy his own brush with mainstream success by adapting Stephen King's Firestarter (1984) for producer Dino De Laurentiis and by directing the Arnold Schwarzenegger action vehicle Commando (1985).

By Richard Harland Smith

Sources:

Lucky Man: A Memoir by Michael J. Fox (Hyperion, 2003)
Mark L. Lester interview by by Matt Boiselle, DreadCentral.com, April 14, 2015
"Mark L. Lester Talks Firestarter, Class of 1984 and Lots More!" by Chris Haberman, DreadCentral.com, January 11, 2011
The Class Of 1984 -

The Class of 1984 -

Everybody loves a deadline, especially when the Big Moment is pinned to a particularly scary year. Those with an investment in Mayan prophesy sweated out the twelvemonth of 2012 waiting for an apocalypse that never reared its head, apparently having learned little from the pointless Y2K anxiety that attended the turn of the 21st Century in the year 2000, which led the gullible to expect a global grid shutdown. Due exclusively to the persuasive writing skills of George Orwell, 1984 was anticipated with queasy stomachs and alarmist bloviation long before the first of that year. British filmmaker Michael Radford adapted the 1949 novel 1984 for release in cinemas in the year in which Orwell's dystopian vision laid its action - but two years earlier, and on the other end of the prestige spectrum, drive-in auteur Mark L. Lester had beaten Radford to the punch with the disruptive punk aesthetics of The Class of 1984 (1982). A DIY self-actualizer who had made the gearhead classic Steel Arena (1973) - focusing on the white knuckle exploits of death-defying stunt drivers - on his own dime and went on to craft the drive-in perennials Truck Stop Women (1974), Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw (1976), and Roller Boogie (1979), Lester was inspired to write Class of 1984 after noting that his old high school in the San Fernando Valley community of North Hills had been overrun by youth gangs. "I began doing enormous amounts of research," Lester told the horror website Dread Central in April of 2015. "And I found that there were all these incidents of violence in the schools - and this was way before Columbine... So all of these things - gang fights, prostitutes, drugs, and there was even a teacher who had come to class with a gun... So I put all the incidents together, with a Blackboard Jungle type-story where all of this comes to an urban high school, and that's how it all started." Lester was able to cast his first choice to play an idealistic school teacher crushed by the axis of administrative incompetence and student hostility in Perry King. Like Lester, a native Ohioan, King's film career had begun in earnest a decade earlier with key roles in George Roy Hill's Slaughterhouse Five (1972) and Waris Hussein's The Possession of Joel Delaney (1972), and as one of the rising stars of Martin Davidson and Stephen Verona's The Lord's of Flatbush (1974) opposite Sylvester Stallone and Henry Winkler. The actor was by this point transitioning from youthful leading man roles to playing more mature characters, a career trajectory that would lead to the fleet of military men, senators, congressmen, and presidents he would portray in a career spanning more than forty years. With a shooting location secured in affordable Toronto, Lester would fill his supporting cast with Canadian actors, while bringing along with him a couple of Hollywood players -- Roddy McDowall, as a sensitive school teacher who cracks under the strain; Timothy Van Patten (then coming off a long run as a regular on TV's high school-set The White Shadow) as the leader of the school gang; and a fresh-faced Canadian-born actor named Michael Fox, whose later success on American television would necessitate the adoption of the professional name Michael J. Fox. Born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1961 and raised in British Columbia, Fox got started young in theatre and had made sufficient gains on Canadian television to effect a career move at age 18 to Hollywood. Parts on such American TV series as Lou Grant and Trapper John, M.D., as well as a role in Walt Disney's Midnight Madness (1980), were encouraging, but by the time he accepted a minor role in Class of 1984 Fox was giving serious thought to returning to Canada for good. Shortly after completing the Lester film, Fox auditioned for the NBC sitcom Family Ties, whose pilot episode aired in September 1982, a month after the theatrical rollout of Class of 1984. A perfect fit for the comic relief role of teen neoconservative Alex Keaton, Fox parlayed his small screen success into a run of profitable feature films, most notably Robert Zemeckis' sci-fi comedy Back to the Future (1985) and its sequels. Twenty years after having lost out on the Timothy Hutton role in Ordinary People (1980) and having had to settle for Class of 1984 (which the actor cracked, in his 2003 memoirs, made "Midnight Madness look like Casablanca"), Fox received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Drawing inspiration from Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971), writer/director Mark L. Lester would graft then-voguish punk rock fashions onto the high school hooligans of Class of 1984, tapping a zeitgeist that had long since left the building but was experiencing renewed currency among suburban youths. Though the punk rock movement was considered by purists to be near death by 1981 (Sex Pistols frontman Sid Vicious had died two years earlier), Lester's use of Mohawk haircuts, distressed denim, and studded leather was predictive of a number of films that followed, from Susan Seidelman's Smithereens (1982) and Penelope Spheeris' Suburbia (1983) to Alex Cox's Repo Man (1984) and Dan O'Bannon's The Return of the Living Dead (1985); in Star Trek: The Journey Home (1986), the crew of the SS Enterprise beams down in 20th Century San Francisco, where Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock is moved to use the Vulcan nerve pinch on a punk commuter who will not turn down the volume on his boogie box. Like Fox, Lester would enjoy his own brush with mainstream success by adapting Stephen King's Firestarter (1984) for producer Dino De Laurentiis and by directing the Arnold Schwarzenegger action vehicle Commando (1985). By Richard Harland Smith Sources: Lucky Man: A Memoir by Michael J. Fox (Hyperion, 2003) Mark L. Lester interview by by Matt Boiselle, DreadCentral.com, April 14, 2015 "Mark L. Lester Talks Firestarter, Class of 1984 and Lots More!" by Chris Haberman, DreadCentral.com, January 11, 2011

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982