Cigarette Girl


1h 7m 1947

Brief Synopsis

Boy (Jimmy Lloyd) meets Girl (Leslie Brooks.) Boy tells Girl he is an oil company president and she tells him she is a popular night club singer. Boy and Girl are telling each other little white lies. But, via some contrived plot complications, Boy becomes a tycoon and the former night club cigarette-selling Girl becomes the Cinderella of Broadway, singing with the Russ Morgan Orchestra. Boy and Girl tell each other they are still more comfortable just being their humble selves. Girl neglects to tell Boy that her singing has been dubbed.

Film Details

Also Known As
Say It with Music
Release Date
Feb 13, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

At his New York City doll shop, Otto explains to a woman customer that all his dolls have personal stories behind their creation. One doll in particular reminds Otto of the story of singer Ellen Wilcox, which he relates to the woman: While working as a cigarette girl at the Golden Hour nightclub, Ellen dreams of the day when her boss, Howard Halstead, will let her sing. When Ellen learns that her sweetheart, Joe Atkins, is returning from a two-year absence, she begs Halstead for the opportunity to take the stage so that she can impress Joe, but Halstead refuses. Ellen is especially anxious to show off her talent because in her letters she told Joe that she has become a big star. Joe, who has been working in South America as an oil company foreman, has also written misleading letters, claiming to be the president of his company. With the help of his associates, Joe plans to keep up his charade and make Ellen believe that he is the company executive. Back at the Golden Hour, singer Glenda Paige, who is Halstead's mistress, is about to sing when Halstead learns that his wife is on her way to the club with Detective Pervis in tow. To prevent his wife from discovering that he is the owner of the Golden Hour, Halstead pretends to be a patron. He also replaces Glenda with the blonde Ellen because he knows his wife is looking for a brunette singer to name as the co-respondent in her divorce suit. In addition to having been given her big break at the club, Ellen is given the key to Halstead's Biddeford Arms love nest for the night. Joe makes it to the club in time to see Ellen perform, after which Otto, who is visiting the club, presents them with a music box as a wedding gift. Joe's luck soon changes, however, and on his wedding day he is mistaken for the corrupt head of the troubled oil company and is held on $5,000 bail. When Ellen learns of Joe's predicament, she pleads with Halstead to give her money to help Joe, which he does in exchange for her promise to continue singing at the club. Otto delivers the money to bail Joe out only to discover that Joe has been released following a sudden change in fortune for his oil company. Meanwhile, at the Biddeford Arms, Joe enters Halstead's apartment just as Pervis presents Ellen with papers naming her as the co-respondent in Mrs. Halstead's divorce suit. Seeing this, Joe concludes that Ellen is Halstead's mistress and makes a hasty departure. The situation is soon cleared up, however, when both Joe and Ellen confess their lies. With their relationship repaired, Ellen and Joe look forward to spending the bail money on their honeymoon. No sooner does Otto reach the conclusion of his story about Ellen and Joe, than a postman delivers a postcard from the now happily married couple. Otto presents the postcard to the skeptical customer as proof that his story is true.

Film Details

Also Known As
Say It with Music
Release Date
Feb 13, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title for this film was Say It with Music. A May 16, 1946 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that Ted Richmond was initially set to produce the film, and that Joe Besser was set to star.