China's Little Devils


1h 14m 1945

Film Details

Also Known As
Little Devils
Release Date
May 27, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Culver City, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,710ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

After Big Butch Dooley, a Flying Tiger, lands his P-40 plane in the ruins of a Chinese village, he rescues a wounded boy, who has been orphaned by the war, and takes him back to his unit. The child is adopted by the Flying Tiger group and taught commando tactics. Eventually, however, Big Butch and the other Tigers realize that the boy, now called Little Butch Dooley, needs a proper education and send him to the Temple Missionary School, which is operated by the kindly Doc Temple, under the still neutral American flag. While there, Little Butch organizes the other refugee children and trains them in guerrilla warfare. In spite of Doc's pleas, the orphans steal away from the mission at night in order to prey on the Japanese. During one of their forays, the children, dubbed "The Little Devils," secure a large store of Japanese gasoline for the Flying Tigers. Although Little Butch is wounded during the raid, he continues to lead his group, until two of them are taken prisoner while blowing up a Japanese supply base. When Doc pleads with a Japanese officer for their release, he learns about the attack on Pearl Harbor and is told that, as he is now the enemy, he, too, will be taken prisoner. Through a scheme devised by Little Butch, Doc is rescued, and soon after, the Japanese bomb the mission. Later, an American plane crashes, and the Little Devils race with the Japanese to reach the wreck. The Little Devils find the American plane first and are surprised to discover that the pilot is Big Butch. After treating Big Butch's wounds, the Little Devils help him cross a river and return safely to the Chinese lines. As the boys are escaping, however, a Japanese patrol converges on them, and they sacrifice their lives while shooting it out with the enemy. Sometime later, the spirit of Little Butch rides on a bomber with Big Butch, as he drops a cargo of explosives on Tokyo.

Film Details

Also Known As
Little Devils
Release Date
May 27, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Culver City, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,710ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Little Devils. The Motion Picture Herald review notes that the film is introduced by a narrator and is "based on facts." According to a May 1944 Los Angeles Examiner item, the picture was to be made with "the aid and cooperation of the Chinese government," and was to feature a foreword by Madame Chiang Kai-Shek. Madame Chiang's contribution to the completed film, if any, has not been confirmed, however. News items announced that the picture was to have its world premiere in Washington, D.C., with the "diplomatic corps," but no information confirming this premiere was found. Dick Chang and DiDi Chang, the son of H. H. Chang, a former ambassador to Poland, were announced as cast members in July 1944 Hollywood Reporter news items, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. According to War Department, Bureau of Public Relations records, stock shots from the Department's 1944 documentary The Battle of China were used in the picture. War Department records also indicate that a mock-up of a B-17 was filmed at the Army Air Force First Motion Picture Unit in Culver City, CA. This film marked the producing debut of longtime actor Grant Withers.