Casper


1h 41m 1995

Brief Synopsis

Casper is a friendly but lonely young ghost who can't seem to help scaring people. Then, one day, two new visitors show up on the doorstep of his fantastically haunted house, Whipstaff Manor: Kat Harvey and her eccentric dad, Dr. Harvey, a self-styled "ghost therapist." Whipstaff's scheming owner, C

Film Details

Also Known As
Gasparzinho, O Fantasminha Camarada
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Synopsis

Casper is a friendly but lonely young ghost who can't seem to help scaring people. Then, one day, two new visitors show up on the doorstep of his fantastically haunted house, Whipstaff Manor: Kat Harvey and her eccentric dad, Dr. Harvey, a self-styled "ghost therapist." Whipstaff's scheming owner, Carrigan Crittenden, has hired Harvey to exorcise the house's spectral inhabitants so that she can get her hands on the manor's fabled treasure. Unfortunately for Dr. Harvey, the Ghostly Trio--Fatso, Stinkie, and Stretch--have their own methods of getting rid of unwanted visitors--and a certifiably twisted sense of humor.

Crew

Mike Nick Adams

Other

Todd Adelman

Other

Laura Albert

Stunts

Jon Alexander

Camera

Philip Edward Alexy

Animator

Yarek Alfer

Art Department

Alexandra Altrocchi

Production Assistant

Robert Alvarez

Production

Mike Amron

Visual Effects

David Andrews

Animator

Steve Andrews

Assistant Director

Michael D Antunez

Transportation Captain

Barry Armour

Visual Effects

Christopher Armstrong

Animator

Eric Armstrong

Animation Director

Seth Arnett

Stunts

Rich Arons

Animator

Lori Ashcraft

Art Assistant

Steven J Assony

Other

John Geoffrey Atkinson

Other

Mark Anthony Austin

Animator

Dan Aykroyd

Other

William Ballard

Driver

Craig Tex Barnett

Special Effects

Leslie Barnett

Assistant

Kevin Barnhill

Visual Effects

Greta Rose Bart

Visual Effects

Tom Barwick

Foley Artist

Carlo Basail

Craft Service

Ron Batzdorff

Photography

Michael Bauer

Visual Effects

Randall K Bean

Other

Donna Ashley Beard

Visual Effects

Cheryl Beasley-blackwell

Costumes

Linda Bel

Animator

Jeffrey Benedict

Effects Assistant

Tom Bertino

Animator

John Andrew Berton

Visual Effects

George Bess

Driver

Ken Beyer

Other

Patricia Blau

Other

John Blausay

Other

Toby Blue

Assistant

Jonathan Bobbitt

On-Set Dresser

Russell Bobbitt

Property Master

Sara Bolder

Dialogue Editor

Christopher Boyes

Sound

Rosemary Brandenburg

Set Decorator

Elena Holden Bress

Assistant Production Accountant

Danny Briggs

Driver

Robert Brophy

Other

David Byers Brown

Animator

Jeffrey S Brown

Other

Judy Brown

Other

Lindakay Brown

Adr Editor

Clyde E Bryan

Assistant

Bruce D. Buckley

Visual Effects

Michael B Bunch

Props

Steven Bunyea

Special Effects

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Randy Cabral

Special Effects

Denny Caira

Transportation Coordinator

Talentino Caira

Driver

Susan Campbell

Animator

Steve Caradelli

Grip

Ron Cardarelli

Key Grip

Megan Carlson

Production Assistant

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Pamela Cederquist

Assistant Director

Lanny Cermak

Camera

Steve Chandler

Lighting

Philip Marc Chapnick

Assistant Property Master

Eric Chauvin

Visual Effects

Jerry Yu Ching

Animator

Lisa Chino

Sound Editor

Terry Chostner

Camera

Dan Chumley

Technical Advisor

Dennis R Clark

Driver

Alan Cody

Assistant Editor

Lara Cody

Adr Voice Casting

Kevin Conlin

Props

Vincent Contarino

Lighting Technician

Marc Cooper

Visual Effects

Judith A. Cory

Hair

Sharon Iris Crall

Costumes

Patrick Crane

Assistant Editor

Dean Cundey

Director Of Photography

Dean Cundey

Other

Gail Currey

Cgi Artist

Bonnie Curtis

Assistant

Mike D'isa-hogan

Visual Effects

Bruce Dahl

Animator

Rodney Dangerfield

Other

Don Davis

Original Music

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Paul Deason

Associate Producer

Paul Deason

Unit Production Manager

Lou Dellarosa

Animator

Mitch Deoudes

Visual Effects

Debbie Derango

Casting Associate

David Deuber

Visual Effects

Maria Devane

Accounting Assistant

Leslie Dilley

Production Designer

Marty Dobkousky

Grip

Loring Doyle

Visual Effects

Dean Drabin

Adr Mixer

Ed Dunkley

Effects Assistant

William Dunn

Location Coordinator

Georgia Durante

Stunts

Russell Earl

Effects Assistant

Clint Eastwood

Other

Tony Eckert

Foley Recordist

Terri Eckton

Sound Effects Editor

Selwyn Eddy

Camera

Tyruben Ellingson

Art Director

Donald Elliott

Special Effects Foreman

John Ellis

Cgi Artist

Mike Ellis

Visual Effects

Eric Enderton

Digital Effects Supervisor

Vicki L Engel

Visual Effects

Dan Engstrom

Sound

Raul Essig

Effects Assistant

Frank Eulner

Sound Effects Editor

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Michael Fallavollita

Assistant Editor

Peter Fandetti

Assistant Editor

Stefen Fangmeier

Visual Effects

Scott Farrar

Visual Effects Supervisor

Cory Faucher

Special Effects

Andre Fenley

Sound Editor

Bill Fletcher

Animator

Jeffrey Franklin

Coproducer

Walt Freitas

Driver

Wally Frick

Driver

Miguel Fuertes

Animator

David Gabrielli

Construction Coordinator

George Gambetta

Other

Craig Garfield

Grip

Lee Garibaldi

Driver

Tim Geideman

Other

Mel Gibson

Other

Michael Gleason

Editor

Jane Goe

Production Associate

Susan Goldsmith

Visual Effects

Cesar Gonzales

Lighting Technician

Rene Gonzalez

Projectionist

Bridget Goodman

Visual Effects

Antoinette Gordon

Set Designer

Rhona Gordon

Other

Ben O Graham

Lighting Technician

Dorie Greenberg

Set Production Assistant

Timothy A Greenwood

Projectionist

Paul J Griffin

Animator

Paul Grimshaw

Cgi Artist

J R Grubbs

Sound

Gerald Gutschmidt

Visual Effects

Mark Gutterud

Camera Assistant

Roger Guyett

Visual Effects

Ann Hadsell

Adr

James Hagedorn

Camera

Michael Halsted

Visual Effects

David Hanks

Camera

Rusty Hanson

Stunts

Erik Haraldsted

Special Effects

Robb Hastigan

Accounting Assistant

Ruth Hasty

Sound

Jeff Hatten

Driver

Annette Haywood-carter

Script Supervisor

Angela Heald

Production Coordinator

Janet Healy

Visual Effects

Matthew Hendershot

Visual Effects

Andy Hendrickson

Cgi Artist

Jim Henrikson

Music Editor

Christophe Hery

Visual Effects

Clark Higgins

Video

James Horner

Original Music

James Horner

Music Composer

Casey Hotchkiss

Camera Operator

Jeff House

Production Supervisor

George Hull

Storyboard Artist

Ssteve Fireplug Hunter

Animator

Greg Hyman

Assistant Editor

Gary Hymes

Stunt Coordinator

Gary Hymes

Stunts

Richard Hymns

Sound Editor

John Isham

Production

David James

Photography

Daniel Jeannette

Animator

Christopher W Johnson

Camera

Keii Johnston

Stunts

Keith Johnston

Camera

Doug Jones

Negative Cutting

Kay Jordan

Accountant

Lorin Jordan

Driver

Zoran Kacic-alesic

Other

Michael Kahn

Editor

Paula Karsh

Production

Doug Kay

Cgi Artist

Pamela J Kaye

Production Accountant

Ian C Kelly

Video

Film Details

Also Known As
Gasparzinho, O Fantasminha Camarada
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Articles

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)


Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82.

He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy.

His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno.

Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star.

His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world.

His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this.

He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie.

by Michael T. Toole
Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82. He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy. His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno. Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star. His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world. His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this. He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Feature directorial debut for Brad Silberling. Alex Proyas was originally attached as director.

Began shooting January 27, 1994.

Released in United States Summer May 26, 1995

Released in United States on Video October 8, 2013

Released in United States on Video October 13, 1995

Released in United States on Video October 8, 2013

Released in United States Summer May 26, 1995

CASPER was created in the early 1940's by Joe Oriolo who, together with Sy Reit, wrote a children's book featuring the character. In 1945, Paramount Pictures released the first Casper cartoon, "The Friendly Ghost," with story and adaptation by Bill Turner and Otto Messmer. The ghost segued to his first comic book in 1949, when Jubilee published "Casper the Friendly Ghost". The concept was expanded into a television series in 1950.

Completed shooting June 8, 1994.

Released in United States on Video October 13, 1995