Casino


2h 59m 1995
Casino

Brief Synopsis

A mafia drama exposes the inner workings of a corrupt Las Vegas casino.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Crime
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 59m

Synopsis

Sam "Ace" Rothstein, the consummate bookie who can change the odds merely by placing a bet, has risen through the ranks of the Midwestern mob to be picked by the bosses to front their entree into Vegas. Ace lives and breathes the odds. He eventually doubles the mob's take and changes the rules of how the casinos are run. But he can't control the odds when it comes to Ginger McKenna, the chip-hustling vamp who charms Ace and becomes his wife. His infatuation with Ginger turns to obsession as she rises with him to the upper crust of society, then turns to the bottle and pills for consolation in her gilded cage. The third member of this triangle of greed and obsession is Nicky Santoro, Ace's best friend and fellow graduate of the city streets. Together, they run the perfect operation, with Ace in charge and Nicky providing the muscle. But as Nicky expands his interests and each man gains power, their lives become entangled in a story of hot tempers, obstinacy, money, love and deception.

Cast

Robert De Niro

Sharon Stone

Joe Pesci

James Woods

Don Rickles

Alan King

Carol Cardwell

Mike Weatherford

Joseph Rigano

Frank Washko

Tyde Kierney

George W Allf

Carl Ciarfalio

C C Carr

Patti James

Ali Pirouzkar

Rick Crachy

Bobby Hitt

Frankie Jay Allison

Fred Smith

Frank Regich

Salovatore Petrillo

Dean Casper

Richard Amalfitano

Casper Molee

Herb Schwartz

Eric Randall

Clem Caserta

Michael Toney

Catherine Scorsese

Sonny D'angelo

David Arcerio

Joe Molinaro

Madeline Parquegte

Richard Wagner

Jim Morgan Williams

Jayne Meadows

Herself

Joe Lacoco

Gary C Rainey

Tommy Devito

Joseph Bono

Gino Bertin

Millicent Sheridan

Rudy Guerrero

Gene Fuffini

Peter Conti

Brian Lebaron

Frank Vincent

Jeseph Reidy

Catherine Scorsese

Cameron Milzer

Dave Courvoisier

Bill Allison

Kevin Pollak

Joey Depinto

David Rose

Robert Sidell

Max Raven

Steve Allen

Himself

Frankie Avalon

Himself

Paul Dottore

Shellee Renee

Dom Angelo

Andy Jarrell

Gil Dova

Peter Sugden

Haven Earle Haley

Greg Anderson

Janet Denti

Daniel P Conte

David Varriale

Paul Herman

Brian Reddy

Oscar Goodman

Himself

Erika Von Tagen

Carol Wilson

Toru Nagai

Jerry Vale

Himself

L. Q. Jones

Jeffrey Azzinaro

Leain Vashon

Craig Vincent

J Charles Thompson

Carrie Cipollini

Jeff Anderson

Richard Riehle

Jack Orend

Barbara Spanjers

John Bloom

Jed Mills

Buck Stephens

Stuart Nisbet

Larry E Nadler

Steve Vignari

Christian A Azzinaro

Gwen Castaldi

Melissa Prophet

Mike Higelmire

Lead Person

Folliott Lecoque

Mike Bradley

Nobu Matsuhisa

Csaba Maczala

Claudia Haro

Frank Adonis

David Leavitt

Mufid M Khoury

Dick Smothers

Mitch Kolpan

Pasquale Cajano

Nan Brennan

Mike Maines

F Marcus Casper

Richard F Strafella

Carol Krolick

Karyn Amalfitano

Heidi Keller

George Comando

Michael Paskevich

Sly Smith

Khosrow Abrishami

Jonathan Kraft

Joe Ladue

John Manca

Michael Mckensie Pratt

Vinny Vella Sr.

Robert C Tetzlaff

Loren Stevens

Sasha Semenoff

Richard T Smith

Dominick Grieco

Philip Suriano

Anthony F Russell

Jeff Corbin

Mortiki Yerushalmi

Linda Perri

Jennifer M Abbott

Randy Sutton

Sam Wilson

Alfred Nittoli

Ruth Gillis

Roy Conrad

Paige Novodor

Ronald Maccone

Joe Anastasi

Crew

Omar Abderrahman

On-Set Dresser

Alan Allinger

Foreman

Colin Anderson

Steadicam Operator

Glenn E. Anderson

Driver

Greg Anderson

Stunts

Claudia Anglin

Driver

Danny Anglin

Transportation Coordinator

Rodney Armanino

Construction Coordinator

Donna L Armstrong

Other

John G Atkinson

Sound

Rick Avery

Stunts

Reynaldo Barrera

Electrician

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunt Coordinator

Ben Barron

Visual Effects

Craig Barron

Visual Effects Supervisor

Al Bartoli

Driver

Elaine Bass

Titles

Saul Bass

Titles

Duard Wayne Binkly

Driver

Richard L Blackwell

Stunts

William Blaydes

Grip

Margaret Bodde

Assistant

David Boulton

Adr

Jon Boyden

Set Costumer

Dan Bradley

Stunts

Scott Brock

Assistant Editor

Garrett Brown

Steadicam Operator

John A. Brubaker

Driver

Pasquale Buba

Editor

Michael Burmeister

Location Manager

Richard Butler

Stunts

Jack R Campbell

Driver

Nicole M Carelli

Assistant Production Coordinator

Howard W Carey

Production Assistant

Bobby Carter

Driver

Michael J Carter

Driver

William C Carter

Driver

Phillip V Caruso

Photography

Baird Caswell

Other

Chris Centrella

Key Grip

Robin Chambers

Assistant

Kam Chan

Foley Editor

Ben Cheah

Sound

Ted Chu

Steadicam Operator

Frank Ciota

Production Assistant

Doug Coleman

Stunt Coordinator

Ralph Coleman

Assistant Location Manager

Richard K Conboy

Driver

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

Kathleen Courtney

Production Coordinator

Steve Craft

Camera

Max Daniels

Stunts

Richard B Darling

Driver

Bill Darrow

Other

William P Davis

Driver

Barbara De Fina

Producer

Ken Diaz

Makeup Artist

Mark Donaldson

Stunts

Chris Doyle

Stunts

Michael Doyle

Driver

Ralph B Draper

Driver

Casey Dugan

Driver

Sean M Dugan

Driver

John Dunn

Costume Designer

Danna Edwards

Costumes

Bob Elmore

Stunts

Christopher Evans

Visual Effects

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Everett E Everett

Driver

Ray Favero

Casting Associate

Rob Fernandez

Technical Operations Manager

Dante Ferretti

Production Designer

Chris Fielder

Assistant Sound Editor

Tom Fleischman

Rerecording

Thomas Foligno

Assistant Editor

Marianne Franco

Production Assistant

Eugene Gearty

Sound Editor

Kelli Gillam

Accounting Assistant

Jason Goedeker

Production Assistant

Daniel C Gold

Camera Operator

Karen Golden

Script Supervisor

Lewis Goldstein

Sound Editor

Alfonso Gomez-rejon

Production Assistant

Bradley M Goodman

Post-Production Supervisor

George Joseph Gordon

Production Assistant

Bill Gray

Driver

Michael Greenwood

Assistant Director

Khan Griffith

Electrician

Virgil E Griffith

Driver

Oda Groeschel

Costumes

John J Guay

Driver

Gary Guercio

Stunts

Chris Haarhoff

Steadicam Operator

Mark Hadland

Best Boy

Dick Hancock

Stunts

Josh Hancock

Other

Donald S. Harback

Driver

Scott Harris

Assistant Director

Dale Haugo

Foreman

M Todd Henry

Camera Operator

Mo Henry

Negative Cutting

Ilona Herman

Makeup

Wendell A Hill

Carpenter

Joel R Hirsch

Assistant Editor

Bob Hirsh

Special Thanks To

A Todd Holland

Art Department Coordinator

Kim Houser

Transportation

Sean Huff

Apprentice

Buddy Hunter

Transportation Co-Captain

Loren Janes

Stunts

Billy Judkins

Stunts

Georgia Kacandes

Production Manager

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

Gary Kieldrup

Assistant Property Master

Ian Kincaid

Gaffer

Dean M King

Best Boy Grip

Jerry L Knight

Driver

Kevin Kolovich

Production Assistant

Kim K Kono

Electrician

Dan Korintus

Dialogue Editor

Brett Kramer

Craft Service

Gary Kramer

Craft Service

Annette Kudrak

Adr Editor

Braden Kuhlman

Other

Cheryl Kurk

Accounting Assistant

James Kwei

Associate Editor

Cindy Lagerstrom

Electrician

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Jerry Lane

Assistant

Paul Leblanc

Hair

Jeff Levison

Consultant

Ellen Lewis

Casting Director

Blake Leyh

Sound

Skip Lievsay

Sound Editor

Julie Linder

Assistant Sound Editor

Marissa Littlefield

Adr Editor

Spanky Lofland

Production Assistant

Paul Lombardi

Special Effects Coordinator

Dickinson Luke

Electrician

Jerry Luthart

Foreman

Bobby Mackston

Music Editor

John Manocchia

Electrician

Clayton March

Other

Angel Marquez

Driver

Robert Dale Marrocco

Stunts

Kristin Marshall

Driver

Kristin Marshall

Assistant

Eddie Matthews

Stunts

Martin Matzinger

Editor

Paul Mayer

Projectionist

Nancy Mcardle

Costume Supervisor

Hugh Mccallum

Grip

Kimberly R Mccord

Apprentice

Heather Mccurdy

Casting Associate

Peter Mckernan

Stunts

Ardie Mclaughlin

Transportation Captain

Dennis L Mclaughlin

Driver

Todd Mcmullen

Assistant

Michael A Mendez

Key Rigging Grip

Sylvia Menno

Dialogue Editor

David L Merrill

Dolly Grip

Morgan M. Miles

Accounting Assistant

Nathan Miller

Grip

Todd Milner

Music

Tobia Minckler

Production Assistant

Angelo Moreno

On-Set Dresser

Maggie Morgan

Assistant Costume Designer

Elizabeth A Morin

Assistant

James M Morris

Location Manager

J Michael Muro

Steadicam Operator

Cory C. Myler

Production Assistant

John P Nardone

Driver

Cameron Noble

Photography

Valerie O'brien

Set Costumer

J Gregory Orr

Driver

Mona Orr

Hair Stylist

Douglas Owens

Production Assistant

Eliza Paley

Dialogue Editor

Dennis Parrish

Property Master

Glenfield Payne

Sound Editor

Maggie Peterson-mancuso

Location Assistant

Philip C Pfeiffer

Photography

Paulette Pierotti

Assistant

Nicholas Pileggi

Screenplay

Nicholas Pileggi

Book As Source Material

Paul Plannette

Assistant Camera Operator

John J Polce

Stunts

Seyton Pooley

On-Set Dresser

Sandra Powell

Driver

Robert A Preston

Grip

Bruce Pross

Foley

Charles Ramirez

Driver

Chris Ramsey

Boom Operator

Ted Reed

Driver

Joseph Reidy

Assistant Director

Joseph Reidy

Associate Producer

Robert Richardson

Director Of Photography

Deborah Ricketts

Researcher

Darin Rivetti

Assistant Director

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Crime
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 59m

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1995
Sharon Stone

Articles

Casino


The joke at the time of its release was, "I liked Casino (1995) better under its original title, Goodfellas (1990)." The joke was an easy one, the two Martin Scorsese films being so thematically and structurally similar. But it was also a lazy critique of a complex film that has grown in stature since its release. Both Casino and Goodfellas tell the story of an outsider brought into the mob, told in flashback, with the lead character narrating. Casino ups the ante by having multiple narrators interspersed, a gamble that didn't quite pay off (apologies for the impossible to resist casino clichés). Still, the story is as engaging, perhaps more so than Goodfellas, and the acting is as good as anyone would expect from a Scorsese movie, which is to say, it is superb.

The story follows the real life exploits of Sam "Ace" Rothstein (Robert De Niro) who ran a mob-owned casino in Las Vegas, doubling its profits before running afoul of the gambling commission that eventually saw him sitting in a car while a bomb blew it up. In fact, that's how the film starts, with Sam being blown up in his car and yet narrating from the perspective of the future. It's a hell of a way to immediately engage the viewer and the movie doesn't stop to catch its breath for the next three hours. That may seem like a long running time for most movies, but in the hands of director Scorsese and legendary editor Thelma Schoonmaker, Casino speeds by in no time at all.

Martin Scorsese began working with Thelma Schoonmaker right at the start of his career. His first feature film, a student film entitled Who's That Knocking at My Door was edited by Schoonmaker in 1967 after the two met at New York University's film school. They would also work together on the documentary Woodstock two years later and then not again for over a decade. The reason? Schoonmaker wasn't a part of the editor's guild and thus did no narrative film editing until 1979. At that point, Scorsese had her edit Raging Bull (1980) for which she promptly won her first Oscar. As of this writing she has won three Oscars for editing, all for Scorsese movies. In fact, except for a handful of titles, almost every movie she has ever edited has been a Scorsese movie, and likewise, with only his seventies movies out of the running, almost every movie Scorsese has ever made has been edited by Schoonmaker. That makes the two of them one of the longest running and greatest creative teams in movie history.

The team of Scorsese and Schoonmaker was complemented by Robert De Niro, who had worked with Scorsese multiple times and until Leonard DiCaprio came along, was Scorsese's leading man of choice. As a result, the three of them, director, editor, and star, developed a cadence that can be seen throughout their films. There is a familiarity to the films that comes from knowing the preceding work but also an element of surprise, as each new production used that familiarity to turn expectations around. The opening alone plays on the familiarity of Schoonmaker's edit of the car trunk scene in Goodfellas that thrusts the film into action, only this time, the main character himself is being blown up.

The cast also includes Joe Pesci, Sharon Stone, and the always wonderful assortment of comedians and character actors that Scorsese brings into the fold of gritty crime drama. There's Dick Smothers, Alan King, and Don Rickles. There's L.Q. Jones and James Woods. And there's Frank Vincent, the man that Joe Pesci beats nearly to death in Raging Bull and stabs to death in Goodfellas. In Casino, Vincent got his revenge. He was thrilled, he said, to finally get to kill Pesci's character for once.

Casino did only moderately well in its initial release with both critics and audiences but has become increasingly more popular with both in the intervening years. Perhaps five years was too soon to come on the heels of Goodfellas but now, decades after its release, Casino stands as a movie on its own, and one of the best of the nineties at that.

Director: Martin Scorsese
Producer: Barbara De Fina, Joseph P. Reidy
Written by: Nicholas Pileggi, Martin Scorsese
Editor: Thelma Schoonmaker
Art Director: Jack G. Taylor, Jr.
Music Editor: Bobby Mackston
Costume Design: John Dunn, Rita Ryack
Cinematographer: Robert Richardson
Cast: Robert De Niro (Sam 'Ace' Rothstein), Sharon Stone (Ginger McKenna), Joe Pesci (Nicky Santoro), James Woods (Lester Diamond), Don Rickles (Billy Sherbert), Alan King (Andy Stone), Kevin Pollak (Phillip Green), L.Q. Jones (Pat Webb), Dick Smothers (Senator), Frank Vincent (Frank Marino).

by Greg Ferrara
Casino

Casino

The joke at the time of its release was, "I liked Casino (1995) better under its original title, Goodfellas (1990)." The joke was an easy one, the two Martin Scorsese films being so thematically and structurally similar. But it was also a lazy critique of a complex film that has grown in stature since its release. Both Casino and Goodfellas tell the story of an outsider brought into the mob, told in flashback, with the lead character narrating. Casino ups the ante by having multiple narrators interspersed, a gamble that didn't quite pay off (apologies for the impossible to resist casino clichés). Still, the story is as engaging, perhaps more so than Goodfellas, and the acting is as good as anyone would expect from a Scorsese movie, which is to say, it is superb. The story follows the real life exploits of Sam "Ace" Rothstein (Robert De Niro) who ran a mob-owned casino in Las Vegas, doubling its profits before running afoul of the gambling commission that eventually saw him sitting in a car while a bomb blew it up. In fact, that's how the film starts, with Sam being blown up in his car and yet narrating from the perspective of the future. It's a hell of a way to immediately engage the viewer and the movie doesn't stop to catch its breath for the next three hours. That may seem like a long running time for most movies, but in the hands of director Scorsese and legendary editor Thelma Schoonmaker, Casino speeds by in no time at all. Martin Scorsese began working with Thelma Schoonmaker right at the start of his career. His first feature film, a student film entitled Who's That Knocking at My Door was edited by Schoonmaker in 1967 after the two met at New York University's film school. They would also work together on the documentary Woodstock two years later and then not again for over a decade. The reason? Schoonmaker wasn't a part of the editor's guild and thus did no narrative film editing until 1979. At that point, Scorsese had her edit Raging Bull (1980) for which she promptly won her first Oscar. As of this writing she has won three Oscars for editing, all for Scorsese movies. In fact, except for a handful of titles, almost every movie she has ever edited has been a Scorsese movie, and likewise, with only his seventies movies out of the running, almost every movie Scorsese has ever made has been edited by Schoonmaker. That makes the two of them one of the longest running and greatest creative teams in movie history. The team of Scorsese and Schoonmaker was complemented by Robert De Niro, who had worked with Scorsese multiple times and until Leonard DiCaprio came along, was Scorsese's leading man of choice. As a result, the three of them, director, editor, and star, developed a cadence that can be seen throughout their films. There is a familiarity to the films that comes from knowing the preceding work but also an element of surprise, as each new production used that familiarity to turn expectations around. The opening alone plays on the familiarity of Schoonmaker's edit of the car trunk scene in Goodfellas that thrusts the film into action, only this time, the main character himself is being blown up. The cast also includes Joe Pesci, Sharon Stone, and the always wonderful assortment of comedians and character actors that Scorsese brings into the fold of gritty crime drama. There's Dick Smothers, Alan King, and Don Rickles. There's L.Q. Jones and James Woods. And there's Frank Vincent, the man that Joe Pesci beats nearly to death in Raging Bull and stabs to death in Goodfellas. In Casino, Vincent got his revenge. He was thrilled, he said, to finally get to kill Pesci's character for once. Casino did only moderately well in its initial release with both critics and audiences but has become increasingly more popular with both in the intervening years. Perhaps five years was too soon to come on the heels of Goodfellas but now, decades after its release, Casino stands as a movie on its own, and one of the best of the nineties at that. Director: Martin Scorsese Producer: Barbara De Fina, Joseph P. Reidy Written by: Nicholas Pileggi, Martin Scorsese Editor: Thelma Schoonmaker Art Director: Jack G. Taylor, Jr. Music Editor: Bobby Mackston Costume Design: John Dunn, Rita Ryack Cinematographer: Robert Richardson Cast: Robert De Niro (Sam 'Ace' Rothstein), Sharon Stone (Ginger McKenna), Joe Pesci (Nicky Santoro), James Woods (Lester Diamond), Don Rickles (Billy Sherbert), Alan King (Andy Stone), Kevin Pollak (Phillip Green), L.Q. Jones (Pat Webb), Dick Smothers (Senator), Frank Vincent (Frank Marino). by Greg Ferrara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 22, 1995

Released in United States on Video May 21, 1996

Released in United States October 1995

Released in United States November 1995

Shown at ShowEast in Atlantic City October 17-19, 1995.

Shown at London Film Festival (Closing Night) November 2-19, 1995.

Completed shooting January 25, 1995.

Began shooting September 14, 1994.

Released in United States Fall November 22, 1995

Released in United States on Video May 21, 1996

Released in United States October 1995 (Shown at ShowEast in Atlantic City October 17-19, 1995.)

Released in United States November 1995 (Shown at London Film Festival (Closing Night) November 2-19, 1995.)