Captive Hearts


1h 37m 1987

Brief Synopsis

Pat Morita, Chris Makepeace, Mari Sato, Michael Sarrazin, Seth Sakai. After being shot down in Japan, American soldier Chris Makepeace is taken prisoner and later falls in love with a Japanese woman.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
War
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
St. Adolphe, Quebec, Canada; Morin Heights, Quebec, Canada; Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Pat Morita, Chris Makepeace, Mari Sato, Michael Sarrazin, Seth Sakai. After being shot down in Japan, American soldier Chris Makepeace is taken prisoner and later falls in love with a Japanese woman.

Crew

Joan Almond

Photography

Diane Arcand

Production Associate

Jean-paul Auclair

Generator Operator

Ron Ball

Production Assistant

Luc Ballarge

Props

Bohdan Batruch

Assistant Editor

Marc Beaulieu

Craft Service

Suzanne Bergeron

Wardrobe

Daniel Blais

Carpenter

Murielle Blouin

Props

Elsa Bolam

Dialogue Coach

Elsa Bolam

Casting

Michel Boyer

Property Master

Caroline Breard

Wardrobe

Kirk Butler

Music

Dougal Caron

Accountant

Charles Carter

Makeup

Jean Castonguay

Driver

Viateur Castonguay

Construction

Christian Chabot

Production Assistant

Caterina Chamberland

Dresser

Monique Champagne

Script Supervisor

Claudine Charbonneau

Set Decorator

Patrick Chassin

Swing Gang

Daniel Chretien

Lighting Technician

Debbie Coe

Animal Trainer

Jean-marc Cyr

Special Effects

Louis Deernsted

Steadicam Operator

Francois Delucy

Production Designer

Dino Dimuro

Sound Effects Editor

Sylvaine Dufaux

Assistant Camera Operator

Francois Dufour

Production Assistant

Martin Dufour

Driver

Johane Dumoulin

Props

Marcel Durand

Carpenter

Chris Elkins

Other

Brian Fanning

Hair

Eva Ferenczy-reichman

Other

Mark Friedgen

Sound Effects Editor

Kathia Gagne

Driver

Anne Galea

Set Decorator

Catherine Gelinas

Dresser

Milton Goldstein

Executive Producer

Mike Graham

Sound Effects Editor

Manon Groleau

Assistant

Michael Christopher Gutierrez

Adr Editor

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Sound

Manal Hassib

Best Boy

Elton Hayes

Location Coordinator

Nicole Hilareguy

Production Coordinator

Thierry Hoffman

Boom Operator

Roger Ito

Stunts

Claude Jacques

Special Effects

Eva Jaworska

Assistant Editor

Pierre Jodoin

Swing Gang

Guy Joubert

Carpenter

George Kadowaki

Casting

George Kadowaki

Dialogue Coach

Osamu Kitajima

Music

Osamu Kitajima

Music Conductor

Warren Kleiman

Adr Mixer

Eric Kline

Story By

Doug Kruse

Assistant Director

Carrie Lou Kuri

Visual Effects

Janiene Kuri

Props

John A Kuri

Screenplay

John A Kuri

Producer

John A Kuri

Theme Lyrics

Judy Kuri

Theme Lyrics

Roger Lacroix

Production Assistant

Claude Laflamme

Production Assistant

Htlfne Lamarre

Assistant Production Coordinator

Anne-marie Langevin

Wardrobe Assistant

Raymond Larose

Production Assistant

Marie-claude Larouche

Production Assistant

Bernard Lavoie

Props

Linda Lawley

Song Performer

Guy Letourneau

Driver

Irma Levin

Music Editor

John Lombardo

Music Supervisor

John Lombardo

Theme Lyrics

Yurij Luhovy

Editor

Marion Mailhot

Grip

David Marshall

Sound Effects Editor

Philippe Martel

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Martel

Carpenter

Lise Martineau

Caterer

Luc Martineau

Unit Manager

Luc Martineau

Location Manager

Nicoletta Massone

Costume Designer

Josee Mauffette

Art Department Coordinator

David Mcmoyler

Sound Effects Editor

Ken Meany

Props Buyer

Joseph Melody

Sound Editor

D. David Morin

Swing Gang

Pat Morita

Screenplay

Michael Nelson

Associate Producer

Jesse Nishihata

Casting

Jesse Nishihata

Dialogue Coach

Jean-guy Normand

Stunts

Goichi Oiwa

Consultant

Keibo Oiwa

Consultant

Jacques Ouimet

Swing Gang

Philipe Palu

Key Grip

Louis Pharand

Stunts

Martine Picard

Wardrobe Assistant

Louise Pilon

Props Buyer

Suzanne Poisson

Makeup Assistant

Michael Provost

Production Assistant

Lorraine Richard

Production Manager

Thom Richardson

Apprentice

Thom Richardson

Assistant

Gilles Rieupeyroux

Grip

David Rigby

Stunt Coordinator

Sylvie Rochon

Dresser

Danielle Rossignol

Other

Patrick Rousseau

Sound

Mireille Samson

Helicopter Pilot

Real Samson

Stunts

Eric Sansot

Art Assistant

Steve Sardanis

Production Designer

Greg Schorer

Sound Effects Editor

Jackson Schwartz

Foley Mixer

Andre Sheridan

Electrician

Alan Shoub

Driver

Claude Simard

Construction Coordinator

Frank Smathers

Sound Effects Editor

Terry Spazek

Associate Producer

Steven Steinhouse

Sound Effects Editor

Sargon Tamini

From Story

Sargon Tamini

Story By

Rusty Tinsley

Sound Effects Editor

Scot Tinsley

Sound Effects Editor

Esther Valiquette

Assistant Camera Operator

Thomas Vamos

Director Of Photography

Thomas Vamos

Other

Dick Vandenburg

Sound Effects Editor

Paul Viau

Electrician

Daniel Vincelette

Assistant Camera Operator

Daniel Vincelette

Camera Operator

Francois Vlasblom

Production Assistant

John Walsh

Stunts

Timothy K Walton

Property Master Assistant

Ulrich Waterman

Animal Trainer

Bob Weitz

Consultant

Dean Windsor

Driver

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
War
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
St. Adolphe, Quebec, Canada; Morin Heights, Quebec, Canada; Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1987

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1987

Released in United States on Video December 31, 1987

Completed shooting December 1986.

Began shooting November 13, 1986.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States June 1987

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1987

Released in United States on Video December 31, 1987