Call It Luck


1h 3m 1934

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 1, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 3m
Film Length
5,850ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

London cabman Herbert Biggelwade, who has won the Derby Sweepstakes, plans to start a foundation to provide homes for cabbies and their horses who have lost their jobs through the advent of taxicabs. First, though, he arranges to visit America with his niece, Pat Laurie, a music hall performer. Before leaving London, Biggelwade is duped into buying an old cavalry horse, which he thinks is Sabre, the blood brother of the Derby winner Scimitar. As they arrive with the horse in New York, Biggelwade is separated from Pat. Conmen "Lucky" Luke Bartlett and Nat Underwood, impersonating the mayor and a senator, present Biggelwade with the key to the city and convince him that an ongoing parade for a flyer is, in fact, for him. While looking for her uncle, Pat meets Stan Russell, a down-on-his-luck Harvard graduate who is now a driver for hire, and he offers to help. Meanwhile, Luke, Nat and their colleagues involve Biggelwade in an elaborate ruse, which results in him parting with the rest of the sweepstakes money to save himself from the electric chair. When Pat and Stan locate him, Biggelwade tells them that he was robbed. Stan takes them to live at the boardinghouse run by his friend, Mrs. Amy Lark, who does not want to take their money. Pat decides to get a job singing in a nightclub to pay Amy and insists that her uncle sell Sabre, whom Biggelwade plans to enter in the upcoming Gordon Handicap. Amy then buys a hansom cab for Sabre to pull and for Biggelwade, who thinks it beneath Sabre's dignity, to drive. In the park, Biggelwade sees his old commanding officer with a troop of boys. When Biggelwade demonstrates his old cavalry call to charge on the bugle, Sabre, with Amy hanging on, runs wildly until Biggelwade gets control of the cab and comforts Amy. Praising Biggelwade's courage, Amy insists on using the $25,000 insurance money that she collected after her late husband's death to bet on Sabre, whom they figure will be a long shot. After Biggelwade meets Luke and Nat again and, feeling indebted to them, tells them to bet on Sabre and mentions the $25,000, they see that the horse is no winner and send a colleague to take Biggelwade's bet with five-to-one odds. Pat learns about the bet and, after seeing Lord Poindexter, the owner of Scimitar, at the club where she sings, Pat learns from him that the real Sabre has just arrived in the States. They then switch horses and lock Biggelwade and his horse in a barn near the track. Luke and Nat, aware of the switch, then conduct a switch of their own and hide the real Sabre. When he inadvertently blows a car horn, Biggelwade discovers that the horse kicks violently. He keeping blowing the horn until the horse kicks through a wall and then rides the horse to the track just in time for the start of the race. When the horse lags behind, Biggelwade takes a trumpet from a band member and blows his cavalry charge through the announcer's microphone. The horse wins, and later in London, Biggelwade, with Amy, opens the Amy Biggelwade Foundation for Homeless Cabmen.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 1, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 3m
Film Length
5,850ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The original manuscript by Dudley Nichols and George Marshall was entitled "Horse Race Story." Motion Picture Herald noted the "present hysteria that is selling millions of Irish sweepstakes tickets." Variety commented that "Herbert Mundin steals the picture despite that Pat Paterson, whom Fox is trying to build up, is given every opportunity to snatch attention." While a Daily Variety news item, dated March 26, 1934, stated that the race sequences were to be shot at the county fairgrounds in Compton, CA on 27 Mar, a news item dated April 2, 1934, also in Daily Variety, stated that these sequences were shot in Pomona, CA.