Cadet Girl


1h 8m 1941

Brief Synopsis

West Point cadet Tex Mallory falls in love with Gene Baxter, a girl who sings with his brother's band. Even though it will mean his leaving the Academy, they decide to marry. But when brother Bob writes a patriotic ballad, Tex knows service to country must come before marriage.

Film Details

Also Known As
Here Comes the Band, The Band Story, Twenty One Men and a Girl
Release Date
Nov 28, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,250ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

West Point cadet Tex Mallory travels with his pals, The Runt, Walton, Red and Jimmy, to New York City, where his brother Bob is the leader of a successful band. During summer vacation, Tex is to play piano in the Starlight Room with Bob's band, and as the weeks pass, he falls in love with Gene Baxter, the band's singer. Gene returns Tex's feelings, but when Bob asks her to be careful not to hurt Tex, as he has fallen hard for her, she decides to end the relationship for Tex's own good. Tex refuses to listen when she tells that they are through, however, and proposes to her. Gene accepts, and the couple decide to marry before Tex returns to West Point. Bob is furious about their decision and tells Gene that Tex will not be able to return to the academy, for cadets are not allowed to marry before graduation. Bob explains that there has always been a Mallory in the army, and that it was their father's fondest wish for Tex graduate from West Point. Worried that she is tampering with Tex's destiny, Gene makes him agree to wait until the end of his vacation before they marry so that he can have ample time to consider the consequences. Tex is unconcerned, however, even when Bob castigates Gene and tells Tex that he will hate her someday for ruining his West Point career. Gene and Tex approach agent Benny Burns about starting their own band, and soon they are a hit. Tex receives a movie offer, and as he is discussing his meetings with talent scouts, Gene realizes that his easy success has gone to his head. Benny asks Gene if she and Tex want to do a show at Camp Hardy, and Gene accepts in the hope that being back in an army atmosphere will be good for Tex. At the show and a drill parade afterward, Gene realizes that Tex was made for army life, and goes to discuss the matter with Bob. Because he has been worried about Tex, Bob has begun drinking and ignoring the band, but Gene convinces him to finish composing a patriotic song, "Uncle Sam Gets Around," which she thinks will inspire Tex to return to West Point. Soon after, Gene takes Tex to the Starlight Room, where he is surprised to see Runt and the others, whom he has been ignoring. As Tex and his pals reminisce about life at the academy, Bob begins the number. The stirring nature of the song has the desired effect, and after kissing Gene and saying goodbye to Bob, Tex rushes back to West Point with his friends.

Film Details

Also Known As
Here Comes the Band, The Band Story, Twenty One Men and a Girl
Release Date
Nov 28, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,250ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were The Band Story, The Band Played On, Here Comes the Band and Twenty-One Men and a Girl. According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and the Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, Michael Blankfort, Ethel Hill and Robert Carson worked on a version of the script. Hollywood Reporter news items also note that Carson was assigned to work on the screenplay. It is not clear, however, if any of their contributions were included in the finished film.
       According to an January 11, 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item, Twentieth Century-Fox was considering Walter Huston for a "top spot" in the picture, which was to star Don Ameche, Jack Oakie and Alice Faye or Betty Grable. A July 24, 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item stated that John Butler, Kay Linaker and Ruth Clifford were to be included in the cast, but their participation in the released picture has not been confirmed. On October 27, 1941, Hollywood Reporter noted that songwriters Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger were donating all royalties received from the song "Uncle Sam Gets Around" to the USO. The song was to have its first airing the next day on the U.S. Treasury Department's "Millions for Defense" radio broadcast. According to studio publicity and Hollywood Reporter news items, stage actress Janis Carter made her screen debut in Cadet Girl, and technical advisor Marvin J. Berenzweig was a West Point cadet.