A Bullet for Sandoval


1h 31m 1970
A Bullet for Sandoval

Brief Synopsis

A Confederate deserter vows vengeance on the men responsible for his wife and child's deaths.

Film Details

Also Known As
Los desesperados, Quei disperati che puzzano di sudore e di morte
Genre
Western
Release Date
Jun 1970
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Atlántida Films; Daiano Film; Leone Film
Distribution Company
U-M Film Distributors
Country
Italy
Location
Almeria, Spain; Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Warner deserts the Confederate Army when he learns that Rosa, the Mexican woman he loves, is ill with cholera and about to give birth to his child. Recaptured by the Confederates and placed on a burial detail, he escapes with his friends Lucky Boy and Sam and travels to Rosa's hometown near the Mexican border, where a cholera epidemic now rages. Don Pedro Sandoval, Rosa's father, who had forbidden her to marry Warner because he was a "gringo," informs him of her death and drives him away with his newborn son. Joined by an ex-monk, Warner and his friends are unable to obtain food. A farmer, fearful of exposure to cholera, spills a pail of milk rather than give it to the baby. The infant dies, and Warner swears revenge, drowning the farmer in a trough filled with milk and raiding the countryside with a desperado band. Sandoval's oldest son is killed, and his body dumped on Sandoval's doorstep. As Warner and his men flee to Mexico, Sandoval pursues the outlaw, and during a religious festival the two men confront each other. Fighting with knives on a catwalk over a bullpen, both men fall into the ring, and Sandoval is gored to death. Warner and his band find themselves trapped in the arena, surrounded by a troop of Mexican soldiers. The outlaws begin to fire against hopeless odds and are gunned down.

Film Details

Also Known As
Los desesperados, Quei disperati che puzzano di sudore e di morte
Genre
Western
Release Date
Jun 1970
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Atlántida Films; Daiano Film; Leone Film
Distribution Company
U-M Film Distributors
Country
Italy
Location
Almeria, Spain; Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

A Bullet for Sandoval


A violent spaghetti western, A Bullet For Sandoval (1970) is the grim tale of a Confederate army soldier (George Hilton) who deserts when he learns that his Mexican lover is dying of cholera. The woman's wealthy, ruthless father (Ernest Borgnine, hot off The Wild Bunch [1969]) had earlier refused to let them marry. Hilton finds his lover dead and their baby barely alive, and Borgnine harshly sends Hilton and baby both away. But Hilton keeps finding things tough going; one farmer even smashes a bottle of milk on the ground rather than give it to the starving baby. Eventually, Hilton assembles a band of cutthroats and sets back for revenge -- first against the farmer, then against Borgnine and his gang, leading to a memorable climax in a bullfighting ring.

A Spanish-Italian co-production, the movie was shot in Almeria, Spain, and director Julio Buchs imbued it with a sweaty, dusty atmosphere typical of such westerns. It was made under the working title Vengeance is Mine, and was released as such in some countries. In Italy, it was titled Those Desperate Men Who Smell of Dirt and Death.

In a 2007 interview with Roger A. Fratter, George Hilton characterized himself as "a sunny kind of person" and called his role in this movie unusually "serious and dramatic." A Uruguayan actor, Hilton had already established himself as a spaghetti western star in such films as Any Gun Can Play (1967). A year after A Bullet For Sandoval, he'd star in I am Sartana, Trade Your Guns for a Coffin (1970).

Variety criticized this picture for its badly dubbed dialogue ("Silence, you dog!" Borgnine spits) and slow pace, but noted that "Julio Bruchs's graphically interesting staging, Francisco Sempere's photography, and the story line, a sort of sagebrush vendetta, are the elements of a much better picture." The climactic bullring sequence, Variety added, was "stunningly staged and photographed."

By Jeremy Arnold
A Bullet For Sandoval

A Bullet for Sandoval

A violent spaghetti western, A Bullet For Sandoval (1970) is the grim tale of a Confederate army soldier (George Hilton) who deserts when he learns that his Mexican lover is dying of cholera. The woman's wealthy, ruthless father (Ernest Borgnine, hot off The Wild Bunch [1969]) had earlier refused to let them marry. Hilton finds his lover dead and their baby barely alive, and Borgnine harshly sends Hilton and baby both away. But Hilton keeps finding things tough going; one farmer even smashes a bottle of milk on the ground rather than give it to the starving baby. Eventually, Hilton assembles a band of cutthroats and sets back for revenge -- first against the farmer, then against Borgnine and his gang, leading to a memorable climax in a bullfighting ring. A Spanish-Italian co-production, the movie was shot in Almeria, Spain, and director Julio Buchs imbued it with a sweaty, dusty atmosphere typical of such westerns. It was made under the working title Vengeance is Mine, and was released as such in some countries. In Italy, it was titled Those Desperate Men Who Smell of Dirt and Death. In a 2007 interview with Roger A. Fratter, George Hilton characterized himself as "a sunny kind of person" and called his role in this movie unusually "serious and dramatic." A Uruguayan actor, Hilton had already established himself as a spaghetti western star in such films as Any Gun Can Play (1967). A year after A Bullet For Sandoval, he'd star in I am Sartana, Trade Your Guns for a Coffin (1970). Variety criticized this picture for its badly dubbed dialogue ("Silence, you dog!" Borgnine spits) and slow pace, but noted that "Julio Bruchs's graphically interesting staging, Francisco Sempere's photography, and the story line, a sort of sagebrush vendetta, are the elements of a much better picture." The climactic bullring sequence, Variety added, was "stunningly staged and photographed." By Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Filmed in 1969; location scenes filmed in Almería, Spain. Released in Spain and Italy in Techniscope. Spanish title: Los desesperados; running time: 100 min. Italian title: Quei disperati che puzzano di sudore e di morte.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1970

Released in United States 1970