Braveheart


2h 59m 1995
Braveheart

Brief Synopsis

In the late 13th century, Sir William Wallace leads the Scots in a revolt against King Edward I of England.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Historical
War
Biography
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Glen Nevis, Scotland, United Kingdom; Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 59m

Synopsis

In the late 13th century, William Wallace returns to Scotland after living away from his homeland for many years. The king of Scotland has died without an heir and the king of England, a ruthless pagan known as Edward the Longshanks, has seized the throne. Wallace becomes the leader of a ramshackle yet courageous army determined to vanquish the greater English forces. At the historic battle of Stirling, Wallace leads his army to a stunning victory against the English. Knighted by the grateful Scottish nobles, Sir William Wallace extends the conflict south of the border and storms the city of York. King Edward I is astonished by the unexpected turn of events. Unable to rely on his ineffectual son Prince Edward, Longshanks sends his daughter-in-law Princess Isabelle to discuss a truce with Wallace.

Crew

Martin Adams

Other

Peter Agnew

Assistant Director

Nick Allder

Special Effects

Mary Allguen

Production Manager

Emma Angel

Production Assistant

Terry Apsey

Construction Manager

Peter Arnold

Special Effects

Tricia Henry Ashford

Visual Effects

Christopher Assells

Sound Effects Editor

Simon Atherton

Other

Russ Bailey

Construction Manager

Karen M. Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

Garret Baldwin

Electrician

Michael Barber

Costumes

Sean Barett

Other

Ken Barley

Art Department

Paul E Barnes

Assistant Director

Al Barnett

Costumes

Russell Barnett

Costumes

Eric Bastin

Other

Gerry Bates

Boom Operator

Bryan Baverstock

Other

Klemens Becker

Steadicam Operator

Klemens Becker

Camera Operator

Matt Earl Beesley

Second Unit Director

Anna Behlmer

Rerecording

Beth Bergeron

Sound Effects Editor

Adam Biddle

Camera

Graeme Bird

Production Assistant

Brain Bowes

Stunt Man

Robert Bromley

Special Effects

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Lois Burwell

Makeup Artist

Alan Butler

Other

Eddie Butler

Art Department

Frances Byrne

Location Manager

Ken Byrne

Other

Kirk Cadrette

Visual Effects

Anne Campbell

Extras Agent/Coordinator

David Carrigan

Assistant Director

Marsha Gray Carrington

Visual Effects

Graham Caulfield

Other

Fred Chiverton

Transportation

Christine Cholvin

Music

Vicki Christianson

Special Thanks To

Marilyn Clarke

Production Coordinator

Stuart Clarke

Stunt Man

John Clothier

Director Of Photography

John Clothier

Camera Operator

Triona Coen

Props

Eddie Collins

Director Of Photography

John Conroy

Other

Louis Conroy

Gaffer

Andrew Cooper

Photography

Kyle Cooper

Titles

Stuart Copley

Sound Effects Editor

Ken Court

Art Director

Dougal Cousins

Location Manager

Simon Crane

Stunt Coordinator

Steve Crawley

Special Effects

David Cronnelly

Stunt Man

Gabe Cronnelly

Stunt Man

Francesca Crowder

Hairdresser

Nathan Crowley

Art Director

Graeme Crowther

Stunt Man

Noel Cullen

Best Boy

Daisy Cummins

Production Assistant

Geraldine Daly

Production Assistant

Bruce Davey

Producer

Leo Davis

Casting Associate

Kevin De La Noy

Unit Manager

Glenn Delaney

Production Assistant

Paul Delaney

Cashier

Romek Delimata

Production Assistant

Tom Delmar

Stunt Man

Peter Devlin

Transportation

Julia Wilson Dixon

Dialect Coach

Anna Dolan

Production Assistant

Gerard Donnelly

Electrician

Marion Dougherty

Special Thanks To

Bob Douglas

Props

Bill Dowling

Video Assist/Playback

Eileen Doyle

Hairdresser

Victor Dubois

Editor

Julia Duff

Casting Associate

Anne Dunne

Hair

John Dunne

Grip

David Durnay

Electrician

Dan Durrance

Art Director

Richard Dwan

Sound Effects Editor

Jamie Edgell

Stunt Man

Belinda Edwards

Props Buyer

Cos Egan

Propman

Mark Evans

Electrician

Shaun Evans

Clapper Loader

Kathy Ewings

Accounting Assistant

Anne Farnsworth

Assistant

Sheila Farrell

Accounting Assistant

Gerry Fearon

Other

Ken Ferguson

Other

Chuck Finch

Gaffer

Stephen Finch

Electrician

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects Supervisor

David Flynn

Production Assistant

Willie Fonfe

Transportation Coordinator

Terry Forrestal

Stunt Man

Michael Fowlie

Propman

Peter Frampton

Makeup Artist

Scott Gershin

Sound Effects Editor

Jo Gibney

Other

Mel Gibson

Producer

Hector Gika

Sound Effects Editor

Dana Ginsburg

Special Thanks To

Alex Gladstone

Production Assistant

Sarah Rothenberg Goldsmith

Sound Effects Editor

John Graham

Propman

Peter D Graves

Consultant

Paul Gray

Assistant Director

Paula Greatbatch

Assistant Editor

Adam Green

Production Assistant

Steve Griffin

Stunt Man

Melanie Gore Grimes

Production Assistant

Alan Grosch

Other

Tim Groseclose

Assistant Sound Editor

Tim Guyer

Visual Effects

Terry Hagar

Color Timer

Graham Hall

Camera

Craig Harris

Sound Effects Editor

Kate Hazell

Assistant Director

Paul Heasman

Stunt Man

Robert Heffernan

Sound Effects Editor

Andrew Hegarty

Assistant Location Manager

Jennifer Hegarty

Makeup Supervisor

Jim Henrikson

Music Editor

Mark Henson

Stunt Man

Phil Hess

Sound Effects Editor

Dominic Hewitt

Stunt Man

Claire Higgins

Other

Frances Hill

Costumes

Manus Hingerty

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Tony Hinnega

Soloist

Hida Hodges

Foley Artist

Chris Hoga

Sound Effects Editor

Nigel Holland

Sound Effects Editor

James Horner

Music Composer

James Horner

Original Music

James Horner

Soloist

Kent Houston

Motion Control

Peter Howitt

Set Decorator

Bobby Huber

Key Grip

Craig Jaeger

Foley

Jina Jay

Casting Associate

Paul Jennings

Stunt Man

Gerry Johnston

Special Effects

Sally Jones

Script Supervisor

Ciaran Kavanagh

Other

Jimmy Kavanagh

Other

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

Liz Kenny

Other

Phil Kenyon

Grip

Patrick Kinney

Assistant Director

Lou Kleinman

Sound Effects Editor

Laurel Klick

Visual Effects

Amanda Knight

Makeup Artist

Charles Knode

Costume Designer

Elizabeth Tobin Kurtz

Assistant Sound Editor

Alan Ladd Jr.

Producer

Sarah Langan

Assistant Art Director

Mark Lapointe

Sound Effects Editor

Jeff Largent

Sound Effects Editor

Tim Lawrence

Stunt Man

Judson Leach

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter J Lehman

Sound Effects Editor

Beryl Lerman

Makeup Artist

Bob Lilley

Transportation

Claire Litchfield

Other

Phil Lonergan

Stunt Man

Graham Longhurst

Special Effects

Dean Lopata

Associate Producer

Sue Love

Hair Stylist

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting

John F Lucas

Art Director

Justine Luxton

Assistant

Sheila Macdowell

Assistant Editor

Horace Manzanares

Assistant Sound Editor

Paul H Martinez

Assistant Editor

Joe Mayer

Adr Supervisor

Stuart Mcara

Visual Effects

Sean Mccabe

Stunt Man

John Mcdonnell

Location Manager

Bernie Mcenroe

Other

Steve Mceveety

Executive Producer

James Mcguire

Electrician

Rhona Mcguire

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ray Mchugh

Video Assist/Playback

Ned Mcloughlin

Art Director

Penny Mcvitie

Costumes

Christian Mcwilliams

Assistant Location Manager

Billy Merrell

Best Boy

Sascha Mieke

Camera

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Historical
War
Biography
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Glen Nevis, Scotland, United Kingdom; Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 59m

Award Wins

Best Cinematography

1995

Best Director

1995
Mel Gibson

Best Makeup

1995
Peter Frampton

Best Picture

1995

Best Sound Editing

1995

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1995
Charles Knode

Best Dramatic Score

1995
James Horner

Best Editing

1995
Steven Rosenblum

Best Original Screenplay

1995

Best Sound

1995

Articles

Braveheart


Mel Gibson's second feature film directorial effort, a sprawling epic about the fight for Scottish independence in the 13th century, is one of those divisive pictures whose cinematic worth is frequently debated. Braveheart was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won five, including Best Picture and Best Director. Yet, it has shown up on several lists of the least-deserving Best Picture Oscar winners of all time. In 2005, Empire magazine ranked it the worst picture of the Academy's honorees. On the other hand, the British film magazine's readers' poll - perhaps boosted by a high number of Scottish respondents - voted it the best film of its year.

Critical opinion at the time of its release was equally split. The New York Times said it was "a great ambitious gamble that pays off...an exhilarating new-fashioned epic," while the Washington Post dismissed it as "bloody, glib, saccharin and lengthy."

Could it be that everyone's right about this movie? Bloody it certainly is, and at three hours, the film well earns the label "lengthy," but the story charges along on action, drama, romance, painstaking art direction, and over-the-top heroism. With elements of Spartacus (1960), the Robin Hood legends, Shakespeare's Henry V, and even, as one reviewer pointed out, Die Hard (1988) running through the sweeping tale of a charismatic leader and his oppressed people, it engaged audiences enough to make it the 13th highest-grossing film of 1995.

The "glib" slam was based, in part, on a scene depicting the Scottish rebels lifting their kilts and mooning the approaching English army. Whether or not the display of bare bottoms was a common insult in the 1200s, historians have been quick to point out that kilts were not worn in Scotland before the 16th century, and certainly not in the style shown on screen.

That's one aspect of Braveheart everyone, admirers and detractors alike, seems to agree on: the widespread historical inaccuracies. In a 2009 interview with London's Daily Mail, Gibson acknowledged his decision to place dramatic needs over historical fact. Likewise, screenwriter Randall Wallace noted that, in the absence of verifiable facts about the legendary Scottish rebel William Wallace (played on screen by Gibson), he based his script on the 15th century epic poem "The Acts and Deeds of Sir William Wallace, Knight of Elderslie" by a writer known as Blind Harry, aka Henry the Minstrel. Little is known about the balladeer beyond his claim that he based his poem on a book by a boyhood friend of Wallace, the existence of which has never been confirmed. However, it's generally agreed that Harry's account is largely the stuff of fiction. "Is Blind Harry true?" Wallace has said. "I don't know. I know that it spoke to my heart and that's what matters to me, that it spoke to my heart."

Blind Harry can't shoulder all the criticism for the movie's view of history. Gibson and Randall Wallace also took heat for some elements that did not come from the poem, among them the depiction of English King Edward I as a bloodthirsty psycho and his son, future King Edward II, as an effeminate homosexual. Some Scots also took offense at the less-than-flattering portrayal of national hero Robert the Bruce, who until this film was more generally known as the Brave Heart rather than William Wallace.

Such considerations, however, were put aside when the country saw a significant spike in tourism following the film's great popularity. An economic report in 1996 claimed the movie had brought Scotland ₤7-₤15 million in additional tourist revenue.

About six weeks of principle production took place in Scotland, specifically the Glen Nevis valley, an exceptionally rainy area that offered only three days of sunshine. Gibson took advantage of that brief fair weather to film the story's wedding scene.

The big battle sequences were shot in Ireland. Members of the Irish Army Reserve, as many as 1,600 in some scenes, were employed as soldiers for both sides of the conflict. The Battle of Stirling took six weeks to film and used close to half a million feet of film - more than 90 hours of footage. To get the maximum action and brutality (toned down in editing to avoid an NC-17 rating) while being mindful of animal protection, mechanical horses were designed for the battle sequences. They weighed 200 pounds each and ran on nitrogen cylinders to move them on tracks up to 20 feet at 30 miles per hour. The result was so convincing that an animal welfare organization accused Gibson of using real horses. The production had to provide video footage of the actual location shooting as proof of the mechanized beasts.

Gibson reportedly watched a number of other films in preparation for filming the battles, including Spartacus and Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight (1965). The preparation paid off with intense, exciting footage. In 2007, CNN's "The Screening Room" listed the Battle of Stirling as one of the top 10 battle scenes in movie history, citing it as "scarcely a model of historical accuracy, but tremendous fun nonetheless and, if there were one, Gibson's rousing taunts would have won him the Oscar for best battlefield banter." Gibson came under particular praise from reviewers for staging Wallace's rousing call to arms not in the usual movie fashion - a single man speaking to his thousands of troops from one vantage point as if they could all hear him equally - but for the arduous task it must have been in real life, charging on horseback throughout the massed warriors screaming himself hoarse.

In addition to its five Academy Awards, Braveheart received numerous other nominations and awards, including prizes at the Golden Globes, BAFTA, the American Cinema Editors and the Writers Guild of America.

Director: Mel Gibson
Producers: Bruce Davey, Mel Gibson, Alan Ladd Jr.
Screenplay: Randall Wallace
Cinematography: John Toll
Editing: Steven Rosenblum
Art Direction: Daniel T. Dorrance, Ken Court, Nathan Crowley, John Lucas, Ned McLoughlin
Music: James Horner
Cast: Mel Gibson (William Wallace), Patrick McGoohan (Longshanks - King Edward I), Brian Cox (Argyle Wallace), Brendon Gleeson (Hamish), Sophie Marceau (Princess Isabelle), Catherine McCormack (Murron), Angus Macfadyen (Robert the Bruce)

By Rob Nixon
Braveheart

Braveheart

Mel Gibson's second feature film directorial effort, a sprawling epic about the fight for Scottish independence in the 13th century, is one of those divisive pictures whose cinematic worth is frequently debated. Braveheart was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won five, including Best Picture and Best Director. Yet, it has shown up on several lists of the least-deserving Best Picture Oscar winners of all time. In 2005, Empire magazine ranked it the worst picture of the Academy's honorees. On the other hand, the British film magazine's readers' poll - perhaps boosted by a high number of Scottish respondents - voted it the best film of its year. Critical opinion at the time of its release was equally split. The New York Times said it was "a great ambitious gamble that pays off...an exhilarating new-fashioned epic," while the Washington Post dismissed it as "bloody, glib, saccharin and lengthy." Could it be that everyone's right about this movie? Bloody it certainly is, and at three hours, the film well earns the label "lengthy," but the story charges along on action, drama, romance, painstaking art direction, and over-the-top heroism. With elements of Spartacus (1960), the Robin Hood legends, Shakespeare's Henry V, and even, as one reviewer pointed out, Die Hard (1988) running through the sweeping tale of a charismatic leader and his oppressed people, it engaged audiences enough to make it the 13th highest-grossing film of 1995. The "glib" slam was based, in part, on a scene depicting the Scottish rebels lifting their kilts and mooning the approaching English army. Whether or not the display of bare bottoms was a common insult in the 1200s, historians have been quick to point out that kilts were not worn in Scotland before the 16th century, and certainly not in the style shown on screen. That's one aspect of Braveheart everyone, admirers and detractors alike, seems to agree on: the widespread historical inaccuracies. In a 2009 interview with London's Daily Mail, Gibson acknowledged his decision to place dramatic needs over historical fact. Likewise, screenwriter Randall Wallace noted that, in the absence of verifiable facts about the legendary Scottish rebel William Wallace (played on screen by Gibson), he based his script on the 15th century epic poem "The Acts and Deeds of Sir William Wallace, Knight of Elderslie" by a writer known as Blind Harry, aka Henry the Minstrel. Little is known about the balladeer beyond his claim that he based his poem on a book by a boyhood friend of Wallace, the existence of which has never been confirmed. However, it's generally agreed that Harry's account is largely the stuff of fiction. "Is Blind Harry true?" Wallace has said. "I don't know. I know that it spoke to my heart and that's what matters to me, that it spoke to my heart." Blind Harry can't shoulder all the criticism for the movie's view of history. Gibson and Randall Wallace also took heat for some elements that did not come from the poem, among them the depiction of English King Edward I as a bloodthirsty psycho and his son, future King Edward II, as an effeminate homosexual. Some Scots also took offense at the less-than-flattering portrayal of national hero Robert the Bruce, who until this film was more generally known as the Brave Heart rather than William Wallace. Such considerations, however, were put aside when the country saw a significant spike in tourism following the film's great popularity. An economic report in 1996 claimed the movie had brought Scotland ₤7-₤15 million in additional tourist revenue. About six weeks of principle production took place in Scotland, specifically the Glen Nevis valley, an exceptionally rainy area that offered only three days of sunshine. Gibson took advantage of that brief fair weather to film the story's wedding scene. The big battle sequences were shot in Ireland. Members of the Irish Army Reserve, as many as 1,600 in some scenes, were employed as soldiers for both sides of the conflict. The Battle of Stirling took six weeks to film and used close to half a million feet of film - more than 90 hours of footage. To get the maximum action and brutality (toned down in editing to avoid an NC-17 rating) while being mindful of animal protection, mechanical horses were designed for the battle sequences. They weighed 200 pounds each and ran on nitrogen cylinders to move them on tracks up to 20 feet at 30 miles per hour. The result was so convincing that an animal welfare organization accused Gibson of using real horses. The production had to provide video footage of the actual location shooting as proof of the mechanized beasts. Gibson reportedly watched a number of other films in preparation for filming the battles, including Spartacus and Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight (1965). The preparation paid off with intense, exciting footage. In 2007, CNN's "The Screening Room" listed the Battle of Stirling as one of the top 10 battle scenes in movie history, citing it as "scarcely a model of historical accuracy, but tremendous fun nonetheless and, if there were one, Gibson's rousing taunts would have won him the Oscar for best battlefield banter." Gibson came under particular praise from reviewers for staging Wallace's rousing call to arms not in the usual movie fashion - a single man speaking to his thousands of troops from one vantage point as if they could all hear him equally - but for the arduous task it must have been in real life, charging on horseback throughout the massed warriors screaming himself hoarse. In addition to its five Academy Awards, Braveheart received numerous other nominations and awards, including prizes at the Golden Globes, BAFTA, the American Cinema Editors and the Writers Guild of America. Director: Mel Gibson Producers: Bruce Davey, Mel Gibson, Alan Ladd Jr. Screenplay: Randall Wallace Cinematography: John Toll Editing: Steven Rosenblum Art Direction: Daniel T. Dorrance, Ken Court, Nathan Crowley, John Lucas, Ned McLoughlin Music: James Horner Cast: Mel Gibson (William Wallace), Patrick McGoohan (Longshanks - King Edward I), Brian Cox (Argyle Wallace), Brendon Gleeson (Hamish), Sophie Marceau (Princess Isabelle), Catherine McCormack (Murron), Angus Macfadyen (Robert the Bruce) By Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

John Toll won in the feature film category of the Outstanding Achievement Awards (1995) sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers.

Mel Gibson was nominated for outstanding directorial achievement by the Directors Guild of America (1995).

Randall Wallace won the 1995 award for Best Screenplay Written Directly For the Screen from the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Steven Rosenbloom won the 1995 Eddie Award for Best Edited Feature Film from the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

Winner of the 1995 award for Best Director from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.

Released in United States Summer May 24, 1995

Re-released in United States September 15, 1995

Re-released in United States February 16, 1996

Released in United States on Video March 12, 1996

Released in United States 1995

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 18 - June 11, 1995.

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (Opening Night) September 22 - October 1, 1995.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) August 30 - September 9, 1995.

Completed shooting October 28, 1994.

Began shooting June 6, 1994.

Released in United States Summer May 24, 1995

Re-released in United States September 15, 1995

Re-released in United States February 16, 1996

Released in United States on Video March 12, 1996

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 18 - June 11, 1995.)

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (Opening Night) September 22 - October 1, 1995.)

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) August 30 - September 9, 1995.)

Co-winner, along with Tony Scott's "Crimson Tide" (USA/1995), of the 1996 Golden Reel award for feature film sound editing from the Motion Picture Sound Editors.