The Boys From Brazil


2h 3m 1978
The Boys From Brazil

Brief Synopsis

A Nazi hunter tracks a mad scientist out to bring back Hitler.

Photos & Videos

The Boys from Brazil - Movie Poster

Film Details

Also Known As
Boys From Brazil
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
War
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1978
Production Company
Deluxe Australia; Itc Entertainment Group; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Twentieth Century Fox Sound Department
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution; Itc Entertainment Group
Location
Austria; Portugal

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

A battle of wits between Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele and Nazi hunter Ezra Lieberman in which Mengele plans to harvest hundreds of young men in an attempt to replicate Hitler's genetic structure.

Crew

Renate Arbes

Casting

Del Baker

Stunts

Derek Ball

Sound Mixer

Derek Ball

Sound Recordist

Bill Barringer

Sound Department

Don Bassman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Arie Bohrer

Location Manager (Austria)

Rebecca Breed

Wardrobe

Derek Bromhall

Technical Advisor

Bert Cann

Photography

Pamela Carlton

Continuity

Ron Carr

Production Supervisor

Tony Cerbone

Location Manager (Usa)

Terry Churcher

Assistant Director

Ronnie Cogan

Hairdresser

Jack Coggins

Gaffer

Colin Davidson

Camera Assistant

Henri Decae

Director Of Photography

Jimmy Devis

Camera Operator

Vernon Dixon

Set Decorator

Hunt Downs

Publicity

Len Engel

Music Editor

Paul Esposito

Assistant Director (Usa)

Ann Ford

Assistant

Robert Fryer

Executive Producer

Michael Ginsburg

Photography

Jerry Goldsmith

Music

Jerry Goldsmith

Song ("We'Re Home Again")

Alixe Gordin

Casting

Heywood Gould

Screenplay (Adaptation)

Pat Grant

Hairdresser

William Hartman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

William Hartman

Sound Editor

Theodore Hauser

Camera Assistant

Stephen Hendrickson

Art Director

Stephen Hendrickson

Production Designer (Usa)

Dewi Humphries

Camera Assistant

Ed Irvins

Camera Assistant

Mike Jordan

Assistant Director (Usa)

Peter Lamont

Art Direction

Peter Lancaster

Production Accountant

Ira Levin

Source Material (From Novel)

Bill Lodge

Makeup

Jose Lopez Rodero

Assistant Director

Marcella Markham

Coach

Godfrey Marks

Sound Editor

Godfrey Marks

Dialogue Editor

Anthony Mendleson

Costume Designer

Dieter Meyer

Production Manager (Austria)

Arthur Morton

Original Music

Frederick Muller

Location Manager (Portugal)

Michael Murchan

Construction Manager

Ken Nightingall

Boom Operator

Francis Nugent

Production Assistant

Stanley O'toole

Producer

Tish Oulman

Production Assistant

Richard Overton

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Elaine Paige

Song Performer

Gil Parrondo

Production Designer

Cecilia Peck

Assistant

Fernando Pessa

Liaison

Simone Pessa

Liaison

Richard Pointing

Wardrobe Supervisor

Dinny Powell

Stunts

Eddie Powell

Stunts

Bob Puglisi

Camera Operator

David Quintas

Production Assistant

Thomas Ricabona

Assistant Art Director

Martin Richards

Producer

Mary Richards

Assistant

Edward Rossi

Sound Editor

Edward Rossi

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Sargent

Production Accountant

Jenny Schaffner

Apprentice Editor

Ilse Schwarzwald

Production Secretary

Joao Severino

Assistant Director (Portugal)

Hal Shaper

Song ("We'Re Home Again")

Maude Spector

Casting

Richard Sperber

Sound Editor

Richard Sperber

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Robert Swink

Editor

Christopher Tucker

Makeup

Marijan Vajda

Assistant Director (Austria)

Jean Walter

Production Secretary

Richard Weaver

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Roy Whybrow

Special Effects

Scott Wodehouse

Location Manager

Dennis Wooley

Assistant Editor

Photo Collections

The Boys from Brazil - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Boys from Brazil (1978), starring Laurence Olivier, Gregory Peck, and James Mason. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Film Details

Also Known As
Boys From Brazil
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
War
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1978
Production Company
Deluxe Australia; Itc Entertainment Group; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Twentieth Century Fox Sound Department
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution; Itc Entertainment Group
Location
Austria; Portugal

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1978
Laurence Olivier

Best Editing

1978

Best Music Original Dramatic Score

1979

Articles

The Boys From Brazil


Casting can make or break a movie, but it's the rare piece of casting that can do both to the same film, depending on the viewer. Gregory Peck's borderline bizarre turn as Nazi butcher Josef Mengele is the most compelling reason to watch The Boys from Brazil (1978), because you'll either feel you're staring straight into the face of evil, or you'll be sitting slack-jawed at the wrong-headedness of the entire undertaking. There's really no middle ground when an actor as beloved as Peck decides to clone Adolf Hitler, especially since Peck appears to have de-aged himself by rubbing black Kiwi shoe polish into his hair. One reviewer wrote that he's "made up to look like a cross between a banana republic dictator and a rodent."

Based on Ira Levin's best-selling novel, The Boys from Brazil concerns itself with the fictional post-War activities of Mengele, who in real life was alive and hiding in Sao Paolo, Brazil when the film was produced. Mengele, of course, was the sadistic physician who performed unfathomably hideous experiments on thousands of unwilling subjects who were under his "care" at Auschwitz. (In one of the 20th century's cruelest twists of fate, The Angel of Death was never captured and tried for his horrendous crimes.)

In Levin's story, Mengele is being pursued by an aging Nazi-hunter named Ezra Lieberman (Laurence Olivier, who had just finished portraying a Mengele-like character in Marathon Man, 1976). Mengele's...um...rather outrageous goal, is to raise hundreds of Hitler clones in the same type of social environment where the Fuhrer grew up. This, he hopes, will generate another little Hitler, who will eventually re-start the Wermacht and achieve world domination. Lieberman wants to capture Mengele before this happens, although you might think it would be easier to simply sit back and let the ridiculous plot fail.

Although James Mason is solid as one of Mengele's assistants, the moments featuring Peck and Olivier together crackle with the excitement of two legends knowingly chewing the scenery. Both performers worked extensively on their German accents, not that Olivier needed as much help as Peck did. Dialogue coach Bob Easton worked with Peck for six weeks before they were happy with his speech patterns.

Peck said of Olivier, "He was gallant, funny, easy to be with. Not at all intimidating to others." Olivier, for his part, stated that he appreciated Peck's professionalism both in front of and behind the cameras.

It's interesting to note that Peck, who seemed so casual on-screen, regularly brought his work home with him. He carried pictures of Mengele in his wallet for twisted inspiration, and his family got used to his overplaying the doctor around the house for a few dark laughs. He would even bark at his wife to serve him dinner and drinks, at which point she would click her heals and quickly respond to the order. As for the real Mengele, Peck said at the time, "I think we'd welcome him showing up and trying to sue us for libel." Now that would have been a publicity coup!

Producer: Robert Fryer, Stanley O'Toole, Martin Richards
Director: Franklin J. Schaffner
Screenplay: Ira Levin (novel), Heywood Gould
Cinematography: Henri Decae
Film Editing: Robert Swink
Art Direction: Peter Lamont, Julian Mateos
Music: Jerry Goldsmith
Cast: Gregory Peck (Dr. Josef Mengele), Laurence Olivier (Ezra Lieberman), James Mason (Eduard Seibert), Lilli Palmer (Esther Lieberman), Uta Hagen (Frieda Maloney), Steve Guttenberg (Barry Kohler).
C-123m. Letterboxed.

by Paul Tatara

The Boys From Brazil

The Boys From Brazil

Casting can make or break a movie, but it's the rare piece of casting that can do both to the same film, depending on the viewer. Gregory Peck's borderline bizarre turn as Nazi butcher Josef Mengele is the most compelling reason to watch The Boys from Brazil (1978), because you'll either feel you're staring straight into the face of evil, or you'll be sitting slack-jawed at the wrong-headedness of the entire undertaking. There's really no middle ground when an actor as beloved as Peck decides to clone Adolf Hitler, especially since Peck appears to have de-aged himself by rubbing black Kiwi shoe polish into his hair. One reviewer wrote that he's "made up to look like a cross between a banana republic dictator and a rodent." Based on Ira Levin's best-selling novel, The Boys from Brazil concerns itself with the fictional post-War activities of Mengele, who in real life was alive and hiding in Sao Paolo, Brazil when the film was produced. Mengele, of course, was the sadistic physician who performed unfathomably hideous experiments on thousands of unwilling subjects who were under his "care" at Auschwitz. (In one of the 20th century's cruelest twists of fate, The Angel of Death was never captured and tried for his horrendous crimes.) In Levin's story, Mengele is being pursued by an aging Nazi-hunter named Ezra Lieberman (Laurence Olivier, who had just finished portraying a Mengele-like character in Marathon Man, 1976). Mengele's...um...rather outrageous goal, is to raise hundreds of Hitler clones in the same type of social environment where the Fuhrer grew up. This, he hopes, will generate another little Hitler, who will eventually re-start the Wermacht and achieve world domination. Lieberman wants to capture Mengele before this happens, although you might think it would be easier to simply sit back and let the ridiculous plot fail. Although James Mason is solid as one of Mengele's assistants, the moments featuring Peck and Olivier together crackle with the excitement of two legends knowingly chewing the scenery. Both performers worked extensively on their German accents, not that Olivier needed as much help as Peck did. Dialogue coach Bob Easton worked with Peck for six weeks before they were happy with his speech patterns. Peck said of Olivier, "He was gallant, funny, easy to be with. Not at all intimidating to others." Olivier, for his part, stated that he appreciated Peck's professionalism both in front of and behind the cameras. It's interesting to note that Peck, who seemed so casual on-screen, regularly brought his work home with him. He carried pictures of Mengele in his wallet for twisted inspiration, and his family got used to his overplaying the doctor around the house for a few dark laughs. He would even bark at his wife to serve him dinner and drinks, at which point she would click her heals and quickly respond to the order. As for the real Mengele, Peck said at the time, "I think we'd welcome him showing up and trying to sue us for libel." Now that would have been a publicity coup! Producer: Robert Fryer, Stanley O'Toole, Martin Richards Director: Franklin J. Schaffner Screenplay: Ira Levin (novel), Heywood Gould Cinematography: Henri Decae Film Editing: Robert Swink Art Direction: Peter Lamont, Julian Mateos Music: Jerry Goldsmith Cast: Gregory Peck (Dr. Josef Mengele), Laurence Olivier (Ezra Lieberman), James Mason (Eduard Seibert), Lilli Palmer (Esther Lieberman), Uta Hagen (Frieda Maloney), Steve Guttenberg (Barry Kohler). C-123m. Letterboxed. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

When this movie was being made, the real Josef Mengele was still alive in Sao Paolo, Brazil. He died in 1979, shortly after the movie's release.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 5, 1978

Released in United States on Video October 5, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video January 5, 1994

Previously distributed by CBS/Fox Video.

Completed production September 1977.

Released in United States Fall October 5, 1978

Released in United States on Video October 5, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video January 5, 1994