The Blue Bird


1h 40m 1976

Brief Synopsis

A pair of peasant children, Mytyl and her brother Tyltyl, are led on a magical quest for the fabulous Blue Bird of Happiness by the Fairy Berylune. On their journey, they are accompanied by the humanized presences of a Dog, a Cat, Light, Fire, Bread, and other entities.

Film Details

Also Known As
Blue Bird
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1976
Production Company
20th Century Fox
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

The Queen of Light leads two peasant children, brother and sister Mytyl and Tyltyl, on a quest for the Blue Bird of Happiness. She provides them with a hat that has a magic diamond which gives them the power to draw out the souls of all things, animate and inanimate. So on their way, they are accompanied by the personifications of a cat, a dog, water, bread, sugar, fire, and others. Mytyl and Tyltyl visit kingdoms of the past and future, learning and becoming more wise with each visit. And finally, they learn that the blue bird that they have been looking for was in their own backyard the whole time.

Film Details

Also Known As
Blue Bird
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1976
Production Company
20th Century Fox
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 40m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

No bluebirds could be readily found, so several thousand pigeons were hand-dyed blue for the climactic scenes.

James Coco, originally cast as Dog, couldn't eat Russian food; the only local fare he could stomach was bread and butter. He wound up gaining so much weight his costume no longer fit, suffered a gall bladder attack, and had to be replaced by 'George Cole' . Coco later said, "They tell us [the movie] will finish by August, but not by August of what year. I understand Elizabeth [Taylor] is having Christmas cards printed."

Irwin Kostal, the composer for the American half of the production, clashed with the Soviet composer, Andrei Popov. Popov wanted jazz for the score; Kostal wanted "Volga boatmen music".

In an interview, director George Cukor recalled that during filming he received complaints from several English-speaking members of the Russian crew about star Jane Fonda. Their complaint was that instead of letting them do their jobs, she would follow them around quoting passages from Karl Marx and wanting to engage the technicians in discussions about them. They told Cukor they were already Communists, that Fonda didn't have to convert them, and if she persisted in her behavior the whole crew would go on strike. The producers spoke to Fonda and got her to stop.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1976

Released in United States 1976