Blondie Goes to College


1h 14m 1942
Blondie Goes to College

Brief Synopsis

Dagwood decides to go to college. Blondie goes along with him, keeping their marriage a secret. They send Baby Dumpling off to military school where he becomes top sergeant. Blondie is hounded by the campus stud and Dagwood makes the rowing team. It is revealed that a new child is on the way.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 15, 1942
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,650ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

While attending a college football game with his wife Blondie and son Baby Dumpling, bumbling draftsman Dagwood Bumstead decides that he wants to go back to school. Blondie, who frequently badgers her husband to ask his boss, Mr. J. C. Dithers, for a raise, not only approves of Dagwood's decision but decides to enroll with him at Leighton University. After sending their son to the Calhoun Military Academy, Blondie and Dagwood move into a boardinghouse near the campus and begin their studies at the university. In the hopes of reliving their youthful college days, Blondie and Dagwood decide to pretend that they are not married. The arrangement soon causes complications, however, when All-American football player Rusty Bryant begins a romantic pursuit of Blondie. After Blondie meets Rusty's friends, Marge Easton and Babs Connelly, Rusty arranges to have her move into their sorority house. Dagwood, meanwhile, unwittingly becomes the new boyfriend of Laura Wadsworth, the most popular girl on campus. Later, Dagwood and Blondie sneak off campus long enough to visit Baby Dumpling, who has been made a corporal at the military boarding school. Back at Leighton, Dithers visits Dagwood and tells him that he needs him back at the office to complete work on an important deal with J. J. Wadsworth. Dagwood agrees to leave Leighton until he learns that he has been drafted to replace Rusty on the school rowing team. During the rowing competition, Dagwood meets Wadsworth, who is Laura's father, but makes a terrible impression on him when he loses the rowing race for Leighton. Dithers, hoping to get Dagwood back to the office, takes Baby Dumpling to Leighton and instructs the child to beg his parents to return home. Dagwood quickly hides his son and dog Daisy in his boardinghouse room, but when the police arrive, he and Dithers are arrested and charged with kidnapping. While Blondie attends a college dance, Dagwood suffers through a police interrogation, and is unable to prove that Baby Dumpling is his son, or that Daisy is his dog. Dagwood insists that the police bring in Blondie to identify him, and Blondie soon clears up the confusion. After Blondie returns to the college dance with Dagwood and Baby Dumpling, she makes a public confession that she is a wife and mother. The students later cheer Dagwood for winning a crab-catching contest for the school, and the accomplishment changes Wadsworth's opinion of him for the better. Wadsworth shows his appreciation by signing a deal with Dithers, and, after Dithers agrees to reinstate Dagwood on Dagwood's terms, the Bumsteads leave Leighton and return home.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 15, 1942
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,650ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although onscreen credits list Sammy Cahn and Saul Chaplin as songwriters, and a Columbia publicity item in the AMPAS Library notes that Penny Singleton performed the song "Do I Need You" in the film, the number was cut from the viewed print. For additional information on the "Blondie" series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.0391 for Blondie!