Blame It on the Bellboy


1h 18m 1992

Brief Synopsis

A comedy of mistaken identity that takes place in Venice in the springtime.

Film Details

Also Known As
Panik på hotellet
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Capital Fx; Cts Studios; Eastman Film; Eastman Kodak; Flying Pictures; Hollywood Pictures; Set Meals; Silver Screen Partners Iv; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Lee International Studios, Shepperton, England, United Kingdom; Venice, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m

Synopsis

A comedy of mistaken identity that takes place in Venice in the springtime.

Crew

Steve Abbott

Producer

Alex Abraham

Production Runner

Morris Albert

Song ("Feelings")

Catherine Amey

Other

Clive Andrews

Special Effects Rigger

Alan Ashby

Other

Lawrence Ashmore

Original Music

Mark Atkins

Music

Mark Atkins

Assistant Music Editor

Philip Babbage

Other

Enrico Ballarin

Location Manager (Venice Crew)

Karin Bamborough

Thanks

Libbie Barr

Script Supervisor

Ray Barrett

Construction Manager

Les Beaver

Other

Emilio Benacchio

Other

Jonathan Benson

Assistant Director

Robert Betts

Other

Bruce Bigg

Property Master

Peter Bigg

Dressing Props

Andrea Biscaro

Props Buyer (Venice Crew)

Stefano Biscaro

Grip (Venice Crew)

Anthony Black

Wardrobe Supervisor

Victoria Boydell

Assistant Footsteps Editor

Andy Bradford

Stunt Coordinator

Alessandro Bressanello

Production Assistant (Venice Crew)

Richard Broome

Grip

Steve Brown

Other

Peter Browne

Stagehand

Linda Bruce

Production Supervisor

David Bubb

Carpenter

Colin Burgess

Standby Props

Hermione Byrt

Assistant Sound Editor

Paul Caldicott

Catering Manager

Adam Campbell

Painter

Roberto Cargnielli

Production Runner (Venice Crew)

Claude Carrere

Unit Manager (Venice Crew)

Kelvin Carter

Carpenter

Guido Cerasuolo

1st Assistant Director (Venice Crew)

Steve Challenor

Stand-By Carpenter

Diane Chittell

Production Coordinator

Raymond Churchouse

Plasterers' Labourer

Neil Clark

Other

Robert Clarke

Other

Robin Clarke

Music Editor

Piero Clemente

Camera Assistant (Venice Crew)

Abbi Collins

Stunts

Frank Connor

Unit Stills

Stanley Cook

Props

Jennifer Cooper

Caterer

Dr. Lorenzo Corbetta

Unit Doctor (Venice Crew)

Susan D'arcy

Unit Publicist

Tommaso Dabala

Production Runner (Venice Crew)

Guy Dagel

Original Music

Guy Dagel

Conductor

Sophie Dasic

Accounts Secretary

Dominique Delanges

Production Runner (Venice Crew)

Mauro Demarchi

Generator Operator (Venice Crew)

Gino Derossi

Other

Patrick Doherty

Other

Paul Duff

Carpenter

Andrew Dunn

Dp/Cinematographer

Andrew Dunn

Director Of Photography

John Dyer

Stand-By Stagehand

Trevor Dyer

Carpenter

Michael Ellis

Editor

David Eltham

Special Effects Technician

Dave Escoffery

Electrician

Steven Eyre

Wardrobe Assistant

Richard Finney

Sound Maintenance

Sarah Fleet

Producers' Assistant

Daniela Foa

Crowd Casting (Venice Crew)

Antony Ford

3rd Assistant Director

Alfio Galli

Other

Luigi Gallina

Other

Dario Gardi

Electrician (Venice Crew)

Louis Gaste

Song ("Feelings")

Terry Glass

Senior Special Effects Technician

Peter Glossop

Sound Mixer

Gavin Gordon

Carpenter

Michael Gunner

Other

Robert Hartnell

Painters' Labourer

Arthur Healy

Other

Frank Heeney

Gaffer

Lindy Hemming

Costume Designer

Mark Herman

Song ("The Perfect Moment")

Mark Herman

Screenwriter

Una Hoban

Financial Accountant

Adrian Hodges

Thanks

Leslie Hodgson

Sound Editor

Arthur Holland

Chargehand Carpenter

Jennie Howarth

Producer

Roger Hulme

Production Buyer

Brian Humphrey

Chargehand Dressing Props

Danny Hunter

Chargehand Standby Props

Charles Ireland

1st Assistant Editor

John Ireland

Dialogue Editor

Gemma Jackson

Production Designer

Ian Jackson

Other

Anne James

Thanks

Trevor Jones

Original Music

Trevor Jones

Music

Terry Keogh

Props Runaround

Reginald Keywood

Carpenter

John King

Artiste Car Driver

John King

Driver

Michael King

Construction Buyer

Roger King

Sound Mixer

Roger King

Recorder And Mixer

Kerry Kohler

Assistant Dialogue Editor

Irene Lamb

Casting Director

Brogan Lane

Makeup Artist To Dudley Moore

Kenneth Langridge

Stagehand

Dominic Lester

Rerecording Mixer

Colin Leventhal

Thanks

Melvin Lind

2nd Assistant Director

Iain Lowe

Other

Tom Lowen

Other

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting Equipment Supplier

Roy Martin

Other

Tom Mccarthy

Carpenter

Terry Mcguinness

Electrician

E T Mclaren

Other

Ian Miles

Other

Mark Milsome

Other

Massimo Monico

Steadicam Operator (Venice Crew)

Senna Mortty

Unit Car Driver

Andrea Morucchio

Other

Peter Murray

Carpenter

Peter Musgrave

Footsteps Editor

Brian Neighbour

Carpenter

Lyndy Noakes

Assistant Accountant

David Nochimson

Thanks

Mike Nugent

Supervising Carpenter

Robin O'donoghue

Rerecording Mixer

Tom O'sullivan

Practical Electrician

Des Oboy

Stagehand

Alison Odell

Other

Geoff Oldman

Unit Car Driver

Shizuko Omachi

Wardrobe Assistant (Venice Crew)

Angela Palmer

Thanks

Maggie Phelan

Production Accountant

Michele Pizzardello

Electrician (Venice Crew)

Floriano Porzionato

Propsman (Venice Crew)

Henry Priestman

Song ("The Perfect Moment")

Stefano Priori

Production Accountant (Venice Crew)

Paolo Pugiotto

Art Department Carpenter (Venice Crew)

Sabrina Rampin

Catering Assistant (Venice Crew)

George Reed

2nd Assistant Editor

Douglas Regan

Other

Syd Regan

Other

Simon Relph

Thanks

Lucy Richardson

Assistant Art Director

Arduino Rizzi

Electrician (Venice Crew)

Rosanna Roditi

Production Manager (Venice Crew)

Steve Rogers

Other

Albert Roper

Other

David Rose

Thanks

Ray Rose

Chargehand Props Storeman

Peter Russell

Art Director

Nick Russo

Carpenter

George Salter

Other

Sam Samuel

Speedboat Consultant

Victoria Seale

Music Coordinator (For Contemporary Media Music Productions)

Edward Sinclair

Carpenter

Philip Sindall

Camera Operator

Enzo Sisti

Other

Barbara Southcott

Makeup Assistant

Adrian Start

Other

Gary Stopps

Carpenter

Tony Stringer

Assistant Art Director

Jeff Sullivan

Other

Paul Tappin

Other

Franca Tasso

Production Coordinator (Venice Crew)

Tullio Tombolani

Electrician (Venice Crew)

Terry Townsend

Electrician

Sarah Tozer

Art Department Assistant

Martin Trevis

Boom Operator

Jane Trower

Assistant Production Accountant

Michele Turchetto

Grip Assistant (Venice Crew)

Manuel Vecchina

Other

Mario Vianello

Labourer (Venice Crew)

George Vince

Bestboy

Peter Walpole

Set Decorator

Shaun Walsh

Carpenter

Ann Marie Ward

Makeup Assistant

Norma Webb

Chief Hairdresser

Cherry West

Makeup Supervisor

Geoff Wiles

Other

Nick Wilkinson

Stunts

John Williams

Solo Guitar Player

Tim Willis

Special Effects Technician

Kate Wilson

Thanks

Ian Wingrove

Special Effects Supervisor

Paul Wood

Electrician

Carla Zacchia

Assistant Accountant (Venice Crew)

Film Details

Also Known As
Panik på hotellet
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Capital Fx; Cts Studios; Eastman Film; Eastman Kodak; Flying Pictures; Hollywood Pictures; Set Meals; Silver Screen Partners Iv; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Lee International Studios, Shepperton, England, United Kingdom; Venice, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Dudley Moore


DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002

Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall.

Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.)

Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win.

However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made.

By Lang Thompson

A FOND FAREWELL TO ONE OF HOLLYWOOD'S MOST GIFTED DIRECTORS - BILLY WILDER, 11906-2002

Billy Wilder had the most deliciously dirty mind in Hollywood. The director dug into racy, controversial subjects with cynical wit and rare candor; he set new standards for film noir, sex comedies and the buddy film and his movies continue to inspire new generations of filmmakers.

Cameron Crowe, screenwriter and director of contemporary hit films such as Jerry Maguire(1996), was one of those moved by Wilder's film sense. The struggling filmmaker struck up a friendship with the 93-year old veteran and found a friend and a mentor. Their conversations were recently chronicled in a book by Cameron Crowe entitled Conversations with Wilder(published by Knoft).

Billy Wilder might have been born in Vienna, but American culture influenced him from the earliest days. Given the name Samuel, Wilder's mother called her son 'Billy' in honor of Buffalo Bill Cody. The name stuck.

Billy was as restless as his namesake and left law school to become a journalist. While grinding out articles for a Berlin newspaper, Wilder joined with future film directors Fred Zinnemann, Robert Sidomak and Edgar G. Ulmer to make a short film, Menschen Am Sonntag (1929). By the mid-1930s, he had written seven scenarios and even tried his hand at directing. After Hitler's rise to power in 1934, Wilder fled his homeland. Once in Hollywood, Wilder and roommate Peter Lorre had to learn English quickly if they wanted to join the American film industry. Together the German expatriates learned the language and began staking their territory in the Dream Factory.

As a writer, Wilder could craft realistic relationships with sharp dialogue; he proved this in his scripts for Ninotchka (1939) with Greta Garbo and Howard Hawks' Ball of Fire(1941). As a filmmaker, Wilder was well acquainted with the shadowy, brooding style of German Expressionism. He brought these two gifts together to create a landmark film noir - DOUBLE INDEMNITY(1944). He followed this cinematic triumph with a risky project, the story of an alcoholic on a three-day binge. Not the usual subject matter for a Hollywood studio, THE LOST WEEKEND (1945) nevertheless claimed the Academy Award for Best Picture. By the end of the decade, Wilder dared even to paint a portrait of Hollywood stardom gone awry in Sunset Boulevard (1950).

Each of these films is an undisputed classic today, but even at the time, his films were lauded. Six of his screenplays were nominated for Oscars between 1941-1950. Three of his eight Best Director nominations also came during this period. Billy Wilder claimed the American Dream; he was successfully playing by his own rules.

By the end of the '50s, as censorship guidelines were easing, Wilder's projects became even more daring. Sex was central to Wilder's world and Hollywood celebrated his candor. He directed Marilyn Monroe in two of her most sensuous roles, The Seven Year Itch (1955) and SOME LIKE IT HOT(1959). More often than not, Wilder liked pointing his finger at the hyprocrisy of people's sexual mores. In THE APARTMENT(1960), Wilder took an incisive look at corrupt businessmen exploiting their employees for sexual favors. In IRMA LA DOUCE (1963), the world of a Parisian prostitute was lovingly painted in Technicolor tones. In Kiss Me, Stupid (1964), Wilder finally stepped over the line with the story of a struggling composer willing to offer his wife to sell a song.The film, which seems so innocent today, was scandalous in its own day. Critics called Kiss Me, Stupid pornographic smut and buried the picture. Audiences ignored it. Today, the film is a risque farce with great performances by Dean Martin and Kim Novak. The critical lambast deeply affected Wilder; this would be his last sex comedy.

In 1966 Wilder brought together the dynamic combination of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau with THE FORTUNE COOKIE. Director and stars teamed again for The Front Page (1974), a remake of the newspaper classic; and Buddy, Buddy (1981), the story of an assassin and a sad sack ready to commit suicide.

Wilder's many years in Hollywood produced an amazing string of hits. From sarcastic and cynical social commentary to outrageous sex farce, Wilder pushed his audiences to look at their own values and morals. He was an outsider who wasn't afraid to point out the follies of his fellow man or the worst aspects of American culture. He will be sorely missed.

By Jeremy Geltzer

Tcm Remembers - Dudley Moore

TCM Remembers - Dudley Moore

DUDLEY MOORE, 1935-2002 Award-winning actor, comedian and musician Dudley Moore died on March 27th at the age of 66. Moore first gained notice in his native England for ground-breaking stage and TV comedy before later building a Hollywood career. Like many of his peers, he had an amiable, open appeal that was balanced against a sharply satiric edge. Moore could play the confused innocent as well as the crafty schemer and tended to command attention wherever he appeared. Among his four marriages were two actresses: Tuesday Weld and Suzy Kendall. Moore was born April 19, 1935 in London. As a child, he had a club foot later corrected by years of surgery that often left him recuperating in the hospital alongside critically wounded soldiers. Moore attended Oxford where he earned a degree in musical composition and met future collaborators Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Alan Bennett. The four formed the landmark comedy ensemble Beyond the Fringe. Though often merely labelled as a precursor to Monty Python's Flying Circus, Beyond the Fringe was instrumental in the marriage of the piercing, highly educated sense of humor cultivated by Oxbridge graduates to the modern mass media. In this case it was the revue stage and television where Beyond the Fringe first assaulted the astonished minds of Britons. Moore supplied the music and such songs as "The Sadder and Wiser Beaver," "Man Bites God" and "One Leg Too Few." (You can pick up a CD set with much of the stage show. Unfortunately for future historians the BBC commonly erased tapes at this period - why? - so many of the TV episodes are apparently gone forever.) Moore's first feature film was the 1966 farce The Wrong Box (a Robert Louis Stevenson adaptation) but it was his collaboration with Peter Cook on Bedazzled (1967) that's endured. Unlike its tepid 2000 remake, the original Bedazzled is a wolverine-tough satire of mid-60s culture that hasn't aged a bit: viewers are still as likely to be appalled and entertained at the same time. Moore not only co-wrote the story with Cook but composed the score. Moore appeared in a few more films until starring in 10 (1979). Written and directed by Blake Edwards, this amiable comedy featured Moore (a last-minute replacement for George Segal) caught in a middle-aged crisis and proved popular with both audiences and critics. Moore's career took another turn when his role as a wealthy alcoholic who falls for the proverbial shop girl in Arthur (1981) snagged him an Oscar nomination as Best Actor and a Golden Globe win. However Moore was never able to build on these successes. He starred in a passable remake of Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours (1984), did another Blake Edwards romantic comedy of moderate interest called Micki + Maude (1984, also a Golden Globe winner for Moore), a misfired sequel to Arthur in 1988 and a few other little-seen films. The highlight of this period must certainly be the 1991 series Orchestra where Moore spars with the wonderfully crusty conductor Georg Solti and leads an orchestra of students in what's certainly some of the most delightful television ever made. By Lang Thompson A FOND FAREWELL TO ONE OF HOLLYWOOD'S MOST GIFTED DIRECTORS - BILLY WILDER, 11906-2002 Billy Wilder had the most deliciously dirty mind in Hollywood. The director dug into racy, controversial subjects with cynical wit and rare candor; he set new standards for film noir, sex comedies and the buddy film and his movies continue to inspire new generations of filmmakers. Cameron Crowe, screenwriter and director of contemporary hit films such as Jerry Maguire(1996), was one of those moved by Wilder's film sense. The struggling filmmaker struck up a friendship with the 93-year old veteran and found a friend and a mentor. Their conversations were recently chronicled in a book by Cameron Crowe entitled Conversations with Wilder(published by Knoft). Billy Wilder might have been born in Vienna, but American culture influenced him from the earliest days. Given the name Samuel, Wilder's mother called her son 'Billy' in honor of Buffalo Bill Cody. The name stuck. Billy was as restless as his namesake and left law school to become a journalist. While grinding out articles for a Berlin newspaper, Wilder joined with future film directors Fred Zinnemann, Robert Sidomak and Edgar G. Ulmer to make a short film, Menschen Am Sonntag (1929). By the mid-1930s, he had written seven scenarios and even tried his hand at directing. After Hitler's rise to power in 1934, Wilder fled his homeland. Once in Hollywood, Wilder and roommate Peter Lorre had to learn English quickly if they wanted to join the American film industry. Together the German expatriates learned the language and began staking their territory in the Dream Factory. As a writer, Wilder could craft realistic relationships with sharp dialogue; he proved this in his scripts for Ninotchka (1939) with Greta Garbo and Howard Hawks' Ball of Fire(1941). As a filmmaker, Wilder was well acquainted with the shadowy, brooding style of German Expressionism. He brought these two gifts together to create a landmark film noir - DOUBLE INDEMNITY(1944). He followed this cinematic triumph with a risky project, the story of an alcoholic on a three-day binge. Not the usual subject matter for a Hollywood studio, THE LOST WEEKEND (1945) nevertheless claimed the Academy Award for Best Picture. By the end of the decade, Wilder dared even to paint a portrait of Hollywood stardom gone awry in Sunset Boulevard (1950). Each of these films is an undisputed classic today, but even at the time, his films were lauded. Six of his screenplays were nominated for Oscars between 1941-1950. Three of his eight Best Director nominations also came during this period. Billy Wilder claimed the American Dream; he was successfully playing by his own rules. By the end of the '50s, as censorship guidelines were easing, Wilder's projects became even more daring. Sex was central to Wilder's world and Hollywood celebrated his candor. He directed Marilyn Monroe in two of her most sensuous roles, The Seven Year Itch (1955) and SOME LIKE IT HOT(1959). More often than not, Wilder liked pointing his finger at the hyprocrisy of people's sexual mores. In THE APARTMENT(1960), Wilder took an incisive look at corrupt businessmen exploiting their employees for sexual favors. In IRMA LA DOUCE (1963), the world of a Parisian prostitute was lovingly painted in Technicolor tones. In Kiss Me, Stupid (1964), Wilder finally stepped over the line with the story of a struggling composer willing to offer his wife to sell a song.The film, which seems so innocent today, was scandalous in its own day. Critics called Kiss Me, Stupid pornographic smut and buried the picture. Audiences ignored it. Today, the film is a risque farce with great performances by Dean Martin and Kim Novak. The critical lambast deeply affected Wilder; this would be his last sex comedy. In 1966 Wilder brought together the dynamic combination of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau with THE FORTUNE COOKIE. Director and stars teamed again for The Front Page (1974), a remake of the newspaper classic; and Buddy, Buddy (1981), the story of an assassin and a sad sack ready to commit suicide. Wilder's many years in Hollywood produced an amazing string of hits. From sarcastic and cynical social commentary to outrageous sex farce, Wilder pushed his audiences to look at their own values and morals. He was an outsider who wasn't afraid to point out the follies of his fellow man or the worst aspects of American culture. He will be sorely missed. By Jeremy Geltzer

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 6, 1992

Released in United States on Video August 26, 1992

Feature directorial/screenwriting debut for Mark Herman.

Began shooting April 10, 1991.

Completed shooting June 13, 1991.

Released in United States Spring March 6, 1992

Released in United States on Video August 26, 1992