Blade Runner


1h 57m 1982

Brief Synopsis

In the year 2019, ex-detective Rick Deckard is called out of retirement to track down and eliminate a team of humanoid androids that have escaped from an outer space mining colony and have taken refuge here on Earth. During his search for the fugitives, he discovers some disturbing secrets about th

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Brydon Bertram Baker III
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Synopsis

In the year 2019, ex-detective Rick Deckard is called out of retirement to track down and eliminate a team of humanoid androids that have escaped from an outer space mining colony and have taken refuge here on Earth. During his search for the fugitives, he discovers some disturbing secrets about the future plans of the androids' manufacturer, the Tyrell Corporation.

Crew

Jerry Allen

Visual Effects

Bud Alper

Sound

Vickie Alper

Production Coordinator

Newton Arnold

Assistant Director

Eugene Byron Ashbrook

Boom Operator

Robert D Bailey

Photography

Michael Bakauskas

Assistant Editor

Brydon Bertram Baker Iii

Cable Operator

Don Baker

Photography

Peter Baldock

Assistant

Philip Barberio

Other

Rupert Benson

Photography

Albert Bettcher

Camera Operator

Ray Bickel

Stunts

Janet Brady

Stunts

Charles Breen

Set Designer

Glenn Campbell

Photography

Joseph W Cardoza

Best Boy

Diane Carter

Stunts

Sean Casey

Visual Effects

Morris Chapnick

Assistant Director

Ann Chatterton

Stunts

Albert Colean

Camera Operator

Gary Combs

Stunt Coordinator

Gil Combs

Stunts

Peter Cornberg

Assistant Director

Charles Cowles

Photography

Anthony Cox

Stunts

Tom Cranham

Visual Effects

Jordan Cronenweth

Dp/Cinematographer

Jordan Cronenweth

Director Of Photography

Paul Curley

Visual Effects

William Greg Curtis

Special Effects

Stephen Dane

Assistant Art Director

Howard Davidson

Transportation Captain

Michael Deeley

Producer

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

Philip K Dick

Source Material (From Novel)

David Dryer

Special Effects Supervisor

Richard Dubuque

Auditor

Tom Duffield

Set Designer

Rita Egleston

Stunts

Leslie Ekker

Visual Effects

Bud Elam

Consultant

Gary Epper

Stunts

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

C. O. Erickson

Production Supervisor

Hampton Fancher

Screenplay

Hampton Fancher

Executive Producer

Jane Feinberg

Casting

Mike Fenton

Casting

Thomas Field

Visual Effects

Paulette C. Fine

Other

Linda Fleisher

Consultant

Leslie Frankenheimer

Set Decorator

Logan Frazee

Special Effects

Terry Frazee

Digital Effects Supervisor

Vance Frederick

Visual Effects

Steve Galich

Special Effects

Peter Gallagher

Sound Editor

Michael A. Genne

Assistant Camera Operator

William George

Visual Effects

Rocco Gioffre

Art Assistant

Leora Glass

Assistant

Diana Gold

Auditor

Joyce Goldberg

Production Manager

David Grafton

Consultant

George D Greer

Assistant Camera Operator

Kris Gregg

Visual Effects

Carey Griffith

Key Grip

James Hale

Construction

Robert Green Hall

Photography

James Halty

Stunts

David Hardberger

Photography

Alan Harding

Camera

Dick Hart

Lighting

Graham V Hartstone

Rerecording

Don Hauer

Assistant Director

Les Healey

Assistant Editor

Jack Hinkle

Other

Richard Hollander

Other

Mike Hopkins

Screenplay

Mike Hopkins

Editor

Mike Hopkins

Writer (Dialogue)

Bob E Horn

Costumes

Mentor Huebner

Production

Gerry Humphreys

Sound

Jeff Imada

Stunts

Dream Quest Images

Visual Effects

Don Jarel

Photography

Robert Johnston

Visual Effects

Michael Kaplan

Costume Designer

Brian Kelly

Executive Producer

David Klassen

Set Designer

Charles Knode

Costume Designer

Sherman Labby

Production

James Lapidus

Costumes

Terry E Lewis

Property Master

Marci Liroff

Casting

Alfred J Litteken

Assistant

Buzz Lombardo

Other

Ronald Longo

Photography

Lou Mann

Set Designer

Kelly Marshall

Assistant

Linda Matthews

Costumes

Tim Mchugh

Photography

Gary Mclarty

Stunts

Karen Ann Mclarty

Stunts

Michael Mcmillen

Visual Effects

Greg Mcmurray

Other

Syd Mead

Visual Effects

Virgil Mirano

Photography

Michele Moen

Art Assistant

Marsha Nakashima

Editor

Michael Neale

Location Manager

Beth Nufer

Stunts

Roy Ogata

Stunts

James Orendorff

Construction Coordinator

Shirley L Padgett

Hair

Lawrence G Paull

Production Designer

Peter Pennell

Editor

Peter Pennell

Sound Editor

David Peoples

Screenplay

Thomas Phak

Visual Effects

Gregory Pickrell

Set Designer

George Polkinghorne

Other

Bobby Porter

Stunts

Steve Poster

Photography

Ivor Powell

Associate Producer

Lee Pulford

Stunts

David Quick

Props Assistant

Ana Maria Quintana

Script Supervisor

Gary Randall

Gaffer

Terry Rawlings

Executive Editor

Ruth A Redfern

Stunts

Richard Ripple

Other

John W. Rogers

Unit Production Manager

Chris Ross

Visual Effects

Thomas Roysden

Set Decorator

George Sawaya

Stunts

David Scharf

Photography

Donald Schmitz

Dolly Grip

Richard Schroder

Assistant Director

John A Scott

Props Assistant

Jonathan Seay

Photography

Jim Sharp

Transportation Co-Captain

Arthur B Shippee

Props Assistant

William Ladd Skinner

Set Designer

Steven H Smith

Assistant Camera Operator

Wayne Smith

Consultant

David L Snyder

Art Director

Tom Southwell

Production

Robert Spurlock

Miniatures

Mark A. Stetson

Visual Effects

Dave Stewart

Photography

Tama Takahashi

Photography

Charles Tayburro

Stunts

Robert C. Thomas

Camera Operator

Douglas Trumbull

Special Effects Supervisor

Brian Tufano

Photography

Jack Tyree

Stunts

Pat Van Auken

Key Grip

Stephen Vaughan

Photography

Steve Warner

Production Associate

John C Wash

Animator

Mike Washlake

Stunts

Marvin Westmore

Makeup

Evans Wetmore

Mechanical Special Effects

Robert Wilcox

Visual Effects

Douglas G Willas

Dolly Grip

Winnie Brown Willis

Costumes

Robert E Winger

Dolly Grip

James T Woods

Other

Matthew Yuricich

Matte Painter

Richard Yuricich

Special Effects Supervisor

William Zabala

Assistant Editor

Michael Zurich

Stunts

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Brydon Bertram Baker III
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1982

Best Visual Effects

1982

Articles

Blade Runner: The Final Cut - The Final Cut Version of Ridley Scott's BLADE RUNNER on DVD


It may take another generation for us to sort out our true feelings about Blade Runner: The Final Cut, Ridley Scott's preferred vision of his 1982 Dystopian bitter pill, based on Philip K. Dick's 1966 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. Compromised in preproduction by financing nightmares (which caused the project to shift from Filmways to American International Pictures to MGM), during principal photography due to tensions between the British Scott and his American crew, and in postproduction, where the film was taken out of Scott's hands and a studio-mandated explain-it-all narration was tacked on, Blade Runner was not a box office winner but did attract a widening circle of admirers over the years and has endured to be regarded as a science fiction classic on par with Metropolis (1927) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). The appearance of a pirated workprint in 1990 prompted Scott to approve release of a "director's cut" that removed Harrison Ford's voice-over, as well as a studio-imposed happy ending while restoring a brief dream sequence. Prepared to commemorate its 25th anniversary, Blade Runner: The Final Cut expands upon the 1993 director's cut, with key scenes re-edited and even re-shot. This latest variant is a triumph for Scott and his collaborators but it seems too early to tell if Blade Runner: The Final Cut satisfies on its own merits or purely in relation to the clunky 1982 theatrical cut. This conundrum is certainly appropriate for a vision of the future concerned with the poisoning influence of the past.

Impressively, Blade Runner looks less dated now than it did a quarter of a century ago, at which time its New Wave flourishes felt too of-the-moment for a fictive projection thirty years into the future. Seen at this distance, however, the spiked hair, wraparound shades, columns of smoke and all that neon (an aesthetic destined to become a stylistic staple of the nascent music video industry) can now be regarded as nostalgic appliqués that mesh comfortably with the shoulder pads, porkpie hats, trenchcoats and other film noir signifiers to describe a hodgepodge world without its own style, without its own personality. The effects continue to impress (with some digital cleanup removing fly wires and background distractions) and the performances remain uniformly strong from leads Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer to character players M. Emmett Walsh, Edward James Olmos, William Sanderson, Daryl Hannah and Joanna Cassidy (who returned to the project twenty years later to retake a death scene performed in 1982 by a stuntwoman in an ill-fitting wig). With the old voiceover stripped away the film is quieter, dreamlike, allowing certain lines ("I dreamt music") to pop. Elsewhere, at least one classic line ("I want more life, fucker") has been significantly sanitized ("I want more life, father"), prompting one Internet blogger to dub the exchange "the new Greedo shoots first." With this latest overhaul, Blade Runner: The Final Cut plays like an art house film, more Stalker (1979) than Tron (1982). The original film always did have the power to divide the room and this "final cut" (believe it or leave it) is likely to do the same, at least for the foreseeable future.

Blade Runner: The Final Cut is available in a couple of DVD editions. For those unwilling to pop for the exhaustive 5-disc "Ultimate Collection" (housed in a sleek metal briefcase), Warner Home Video offer a splendid 2-disc "special edition." The same painstaking digital remastering has been applied to both of these offerings and the results are astonishing. The anamorphic widescreen image is sharp (though it is a times hard to appreciate through all the bee's smoke), the colors are vivid, and the contrasts strong with warm flesh tones and deep shadows. The Dolby Digital 5.1 audio mix is similarly satisfying; by turns subtle and bombastic, giving the rear channels a real workout. (In addition to the original English language soundtrack, a French track is offered.) English, French and Spanish subtitles are optional. (Blade Runner: The Final Cut is available in Blu-Ray and HD formats as well.) Disc One begins with an (optional) video introduction by director Ridley Scott, who returns for a director's audio commentary. Two alternate audio commentaries are also provided, one with original scenarist Hampton Fancher, his replacement David Peoples, producer Michael Deeley and production executive Katherine Haber and the other with conceptual artist Syd Mead, production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David Snyder and special effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dyer. Each track offers invaluable insights into the genesis of the project, its difficult gestation period, disappointing birth and rediscovery.

Disc 2 has been reserved for Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner, a behind-the-scenes feature (not featurette) composed of several chapters and running over two hours. Most of the surviving players return here, including Harrison Ford, Sean Young and Rutger Hauer, as well as Joe Turkel (albeit briefly) as well as all of the aforementioned talent behind the camera. There are many great stories told here, from the genesis of the film as a money-making project for would-be screenwriter Hampton Fancher and his friend Brian Kelly (yes, the guy from Flipper) to the actor's strike that benefited the film by extending preproduction to the vagaries of casting (actress Stacy Nelkin did so well in her screen test as Pris, the part ultimately given to Daryl Hannah, that the filmmakers wrote her a role of her own... which was ultimately cut from the script) to Rutger Hauer's onset improvisations (which provided Blade Runner with one of its best lines) to the tragic debilitation by Parkinson's disease of cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth, who finished the shoot in a wheelchair... and so much more. The wealth of storytelling is fantastically illustrated with rare onset photos, film clips, outtakes and deleted scenes. Warners' packaging of this 2-disc special edition is first rate, from the keepcase cover art (which give off more of an Indiana Jones vibe) to the menu screens that recreate the display of Syd Mead's "Esper machine," one of several fanciful Blade Runner imaginings to have since become reality.

For more information about Blade Runner: The Final Cut, visit Warner Video. To order Blade Runner: The Final Cut, go to TCM Shopping.

by Richard Harland Smith
Blade Runner: The Final Cut - The Final Cut Version Of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner On Dvd

Blade Runner: The Final Cut - The Final Cut Version of Ridley Scott's BLADE RUNNER on DVD

It may take another generation for us to sort out our true feelings about Blade Runner: The Final Cut, Ridley Scott's preferred vision of his 1982 Dystopian bitter pill, based on Philip K. Dick's 1966 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. Compromised in preproduction by financing nightmares (which caused the project to shift from Filmways to American International Pictures to MGM), during principal photography due to tensions between the British Scott and his American crew, and in postproduction, where the film was taken out of Scott's hands and a studio-mandated explain-it-all narration was tacked on, Blade Runner was not a box office winner but did attract a widening circle of admirers over the years and has endured to be regarded as a science fiction classic on par with Metropolis (1927) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). The appearance of a pirated workprint in 1990 prompted Scott to approve release of a "director's cut" that removed Harrison Ford's voice-over, as well as a studio-imposed happy ending while restoring a brief dream sequence. Prepared to commemorate its 25th anniversary, Blade Runner: The Final Cut expands upon the 1993 director's cut, with key scenes re-edited and even re-shot. This latest variant is a triumph for Scott and his collaborators but it seems too early to tell if Blade Runner: The Final Cut satisfies on its own merits or purely in relation to the clunky 1982 theatrical cut. This conundrum is certainly appropriate for a vision of the future concerned with the poisoning influence of the past. Impressively, Blade Runner looks less dated now than it did a quarter of a century ago, at which time its New Wave flourishes felt too of-the-moment for a fictive projection thirty years into the future. Seen at this distance, however, the spiked hair, wraparound shades, columns of smoke and all that neon (an aesthetic destined to become a stylistic staple of the nascent music video industry) can now be regarded as nostalgic appliqués that mesh comfortably with the shoulder pads, porkpie hats, trenchcoats and other film noir signifiers to describe a hodgepodge world without its own style, without its own personality. The effects continue to impress (with some digital cleanup removing fly wires and background distractions) and the performances remain uniformly strong from leads Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer to character players M. Emmett Walsh, Edward James Olmos, William Sanderson, Daryl Hannah and Joanna Cassidy (who returned to the project twenty years later to retake a death scene performed in 1982 by a stuntwoman in an ill-fitting wig). With the old voiceover stripped away the film is quieter, dreamlike, allowing certain lines ("I dreamt music") to pop. Elsewhere, at least one classic line ("I want more life, fucker") has been significantly sanitized ("I want more life, father"), prompting one Internet blogger to dub the exchange "the new Greedo shoots first." With this latest overhaul, Blade Runner: The Final Cut plays like an art house film, more Stalker (1979) than Tron (1982). The original film always did have the power to divide the room and this "final cut" (believe it or leave it) is likely to do the same, at least for the foreseeable future. Blade Runner: The Final Cut is available in a couple of DVD editions. For those unwilling to pop for the exhaustive 5-disc "Ultimate Collection" (housed in a sleek metal briefcase), Warner Home Video offer a splendid 2-disc "special edition." The same painstaking digital remastering has been applied to both of these offerings and the results are astonishing. The anamorphic widescreen image is sharp (though it is a times hard to appreciate through all the bee's smoke), the colors are vivid, and the contrasts strong with warm flesh tones and deep shadows. The Dolby Digital 5.1 audio mix is similarly satisfying; by turns subtle and bombastic, giving the rear channels a real workout. (In addition to the original English language soundtrack, a French track is offered.) English, French and Spanish subtitles are optional. (Blade Runner: The Final Cut is available in Blu-Ray and HD formats as well.) Disc One begins with an (optional) video introduction by director Ridley Scott, who returns for a director's audio commentary. Two alternate audio commentaries are also provided, one with original scenarist Hampton Fancher, his replacement David Peoples, producer Michael Deeley and production executive Katherine Haber and the other with conceptual artist Syd Mead, production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David Snyder and special effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dyer. Each track offers invaluable insights into the genesis of the project, its difficult gestation period, disappointing birth and rediscovery. Disc 2 has been reserved for Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner, a behind-the-scenes feature (not featurette) composed of several chapters and running over two hours. Most of the surviving players return here, including Harrison Ford, Sean Young and Rutger Hauer, as well as Joe Turkel (albeit briefly) as well as all of the aforementioned talent behind the camera. There are many great stories told here, from the genesis of the film as a money-making project for would-be screenwriter Hampton Fancher and his friend Brian Kelly (yes, the guy from Flipper) to the actor's strike that benefited the film by extending preproduction to the vagaries of casting (actress Stacy Nelkin did so well in her screen test as Pris, the part ultimately given to Daryl Hannah, that the filmmakers wrote her a role of her own... which was ultimately cut from the script) to Rutger Hauer's onset improvisations (which provided Blade Runner with one of its best lines) to the tragic debilitation by Parkinson's disease of cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth, who finished the shoot in a wheelchair... and so much more. The wealth of storytelling is fantastically illustrated with rare onset photos, film clips, outtakes and deleted scenes. Warners' packaging of this 2-disc special edition is first rate, from the keepcase cover art (which give off more of an Indiana Jones vibe) to the menu screens that recreate the display of Syd Mead's "Esper machine," one of several fanciful Blade Runner imaginings to have since become reality. For more information about Blade Runner: The Final Cut, visit Warner Video. To order Blade Runner: The Final Cut, go to TCM Shopping. by Richard Harland Smith

Blade Runner Returns to the Big Screen - BLADE RUNNER Returns to the Big Screen in a Limited Run Engagement


In honor of its 25th anniversary, Ridley Scott's science fiction masterpiece, "Blade Runner," starring Harrison Ford, is making a long-awaited return to the big screen with a completely re-mastered director's cut, Blade Runner: The Final Cut. The film has not only been completely restored with new and improved special effects, but also includes never-before-seen added and extended scenes that Ridley Scott created specifically for the new edition.

The limited theatrical engagement of Blade Runner: The Final Cut began its run on October 5 in New York and Los Angeles. It will continue to roll out in select cities from now through January 2008. Spectacularly restored and re-mastered from original elements and scanned at 4K* resolution, fans of the original "Blade Runner" will have a chance to see this sci-fi classic as it has never been seen before, while a new generation of moviegoers will have their first opportunity to see why "Blade Runner" is still considered to be, by both critics and fans, one of the most important genre films of the 20th century.

Visually spectacular, action-packed and enduringly provocative since its original 1982 release, the stylish noir thriller Blade Runner: The Final Cut stars Harrison Ford in the enigmatic role of 21st-century detective Rick Deckard. As he hunts for vengeful, fugitive replicants in a high-tech future soured by urban and social decay, he is drawn to a mysterious woman (Sean Young) whose secrets may undermine his own soul.

The theatrical release of Blade Runner: The Final Cut is in conjunction with the much-anticipated December 18 debut of the film on DVD in three different editions, all with upgraded 5.1 audio: a two-disc Special Edition; a four-disc Collector's Edition; and the five-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition in numbered, limited quantity "Deckard Briefcase" packaging. Each edition contains exciting, exclusive extras to enhance the "Blade Runner" experience, including a new, extensive documentary featuring never-before-seen material, behind-the-scenes footage, and cast and crew interviews, plus filmmaker commentaries, and much more. Simultaneous HD DVD and Blu-Ray versions will be released in two stunning configurations: a five-disc Blade Runner Ultimate Collector's Edition and a five-disc Complete Collector's Edition. The Ultimate Collector's Edition will be released in numbered, limited quantities of the "Deckard Briefcase". The Blade Runner Complete Collector's Edition will contain all of the Ultimate Collector's Edition content but will not include the limited edition briefcase.

Blade Runner: The Final Cut had its World Premiere at the Venice International Film Festival during a special screening with Ridley Scott and key cast members in attendance. And, the Film Society of Lincoln Center presented a special retrospective of Blade Runner: The Final Cut at the 45th New York Film Festival.

Cast and filmmakers will attend a special Los Angeles red carpet screening of Blade Runner: The Final Cut, which has been set for December 9 at 5 p.m. at the Shrine auditorium as part of the prestigious Jules Verne Adventure Film Festival. This year, the Festival honors Sir Ridley Scott and his team with a Special Award for their spectacular restoration of the film. Seating is limited with tickets available at www.jvaff.org or ticketmaster.com.

Based on the acclaimed science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, by the celebrated author Philip K. Dick, Blade Runner: The Final Cut was directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples. The producers are Michael Deeley and Charles de Lauzirika. The film stars Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, Daryl Hannah, M. Emmet Walsh, William Sanderson and Joanna Cassidy. "Blade Runner: The Final Cut" has been rated "R" by the MPAA for "violence and brief nudity."

Blade Runner Returns to the Big Screen - BLADE RUNNER Returns to the Big Screen in a Limited Run Engagement

In honor of its 25th anniversary, Ridley Scott's science fiction masterpiece, "Blade Runner," starring Harrison Ford, is making a long-awaited return to the big screen with a completely re-mastered director's cut, Blade Runner: The Final Cut. The film has not only been completely restored with new and improved special effects, but also includes never-before-seen added and extended scenes that Ridley Scott created specifically for the new edition. The limited theatrical engagement of Blade Runner: The Final Cut began its run on October 5 in New York and Los Angeles. It will continue to roll out in select cities from now through January 2008. Spectacularly restored and re-mastered from original elements and scanned at 4K* resolution, fans of the original "Blade Runner" will have a chance to see this sci-fi classic as it has never been seen before, while a new generation of moviegoers will have their first opportunity to see why "Blade Runner" is still considered to be, by both critics and fans, one of the most important genre films of the 20th century. Visually spectacular, action-packed and enduringly provocative since its original 1982 release, the stylish noir thriller Blade Runner: The Final Cut stars Harrison Ford in the enigmatic role of 21st-century detective Rick Deckard. As he hunts for vengeful, fugitive replicants in a high-tech future soured by urban and social decay, he is drawn to a mysterious woman (Sean Young) whose secrets may undermine his own soul. The theatrical release of Blade Runner: The Final Cut is in conjunction with the much-anticipated December 18 debut of the film on DVD in three different editions, all with upgraded 5.1 audio: a two-disc Special Edition; a four-disc Collector's Edition; and the five-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition in numbered, limited quantity "Deckard Briefcase" packaging. Each edition contains exciting, exclusive extras to enhance the "Blade Runner" experience, including a new, extensive documentary featuring never-before-seen material, behind-the-scenes footage, and cast and crew interviews, plus filmmaker commentaries, and much more. Simultaneous HD DVD and Blu-Ray versions will be released in two stunning configurations: a five-disc Blade Runner Ultimate Collector's Edition and a five-disc Complete Collector's Edition. The Ultimate Collector's Edition will be released in numbered, limited quantities of the "Deckard Briefcase". The Blade Runner Complete Collector's Edition will contain all of the Ultimate Collector's Edition content but will not include the limited edition briefcase. Blade Runner: The Final Cut had its World Premiere at the Venice International Film Festival during a special screening with Ridley Scott and key cast members in attendance. And, the Film Society of Lincoln Center presented a special retrospective of Blade Runner: The Final Cut at the 45th New York Film Festival. Cast and filmmakers will attend a special Los Angeles red carpet screening of Blade Runner: The Final Cut, which has been set for December 9 at 5 p.m. at the Shrine auditorium as part of the prestigious Jules Verne Adventure Film Festival. This year, the Festival honors Sir Ridley Scott and his team with a Special Award for their spectacular restoration of the film. Seating is limited with tickets available at www.jvaff.org or ticketmaster.com. Based on the acclaimed science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, by the celebrated author Philip K. Dick, Blade Runner: The Final Cut was directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples. The producers are Michael Deeley and Charles de Lauzirika. The film stars Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, Daryl Hannah, M. Emmet Walsh, William Sanderson and Joanna Cassidy. "Blade Runner: The Final Cut" has been rated "R" by the MPAA for "violence and brief nudity."

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1982

Released in United States Summer June 25, 1982

Re-released in United States September 27, 1991

Limited re-release in United States September 11, 1992

Re-released in United States October 5, 2007

Re-released in United States on Video May 19, 1993

Released in United States on Video 18, 2007

Released in United States August 1996

Released in United States 2007

Shown at Radio City Film Festival August 1996.

Restored, re-mastered print, scanned at 4K resolution, with previously unreleased and extended scenes, new special effects and a Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track, shown at Venice International Film Festival (Out of Competition - Venice Nights) August 29-September 8, 2007.

Expanded re-release in USA (director's cut) October 2, 1992.

The version of "Blade Runner", thought to be the director's cut when it was re-released in Los Angeles in September 1991, wasn't director Ridley Scott's cut at all; it was a rough test workprint and lacked an all-important "unicorn sequence", which is a pivotal flashback involving Harrison Ford's character. Scott was invited to create a "real" director's cut, which was subsequently re-released in the Fall of 1992.

Restored, re-mastered print, scanned at 4K resolution, with previously unreleased and extended scenes, new special effects and a Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track re-release scheduled in New York City and Los Angeles October 5, 2007. Released as "Blade Runner: The Final Cut"

Released in USA on video.

Selected in 1993 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.

Re-released in Rome July 1991.

Released in United States June 1982

Released in United States Summer June 25, 1982

Re-released in United States September 27, 1991 (director's cut; Los Angeles)

Limited re-release in United States September 11, 1992 (director's cut)

Re-released in United States October 5, 2007 (New York City and Los Angeles)

Re-released in United States on Video May 19, 1993 (director's cut)

Released in United States on Video 18, 2007 (restored print)

Released in United States August 1996 (Shown at Radio City Film Festival August 1996.)

Released in United States 2007 (Restored, re-mastered print, scanned at 4K resolution, with previously unreleased and extended scenes, new special effects and a Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track, shown at Venice International Film Festival (Out of Competition - Venice Nights) August 29-September 8, 2007.)

Released in United States 2007 (Restored, re-mastered print, scanned at 4K resolution, with previously unreleased and extended scenes, new special effects and a Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track, shown at New York Film Festival September 28-October 14, 2007.)