Black Tights


2h 1962

Film Details

Also Known As
Les Collants noirs, Un, deux, trois, quatre!
Release Date
Feb 1962
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Doperfilme; Grandes Projections Cinématographiques; Joseph Kaufman; Talma Films
Distribution Company
Magna Pictures
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand (Paris, 1897) and the opera Carmen , music by Georges Bizet, libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy (Paris, 3 Mar 1875), which was based on the novella Carmen by Prosper Mérimée in La revue des deux mondes (15 Oct 1845).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.20 : 1, 2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Four tales are performed by the Ballets de Roland Petit: THE DIAMOND CRUNCHER: A beautiful pickpocket in the market area of Paris has a passion for eating stolen diamonds, to the despair of her gangster companions. She is finally broken of the habit by a truckdriver, Pierrot, who convinces her that true happiness is to be found not in diamonds, but in cabbages. CYRANO DE BERGERAC: An unhappy poet with an enormous nose writes love letters for his friend Christian to send to the lovely Roxane. When Christian is killed in battle, Roxane, unaware it is really Cyrano she loves, enters a convent. On the day Cyrano comes to visit Roxane, he is mortally wounded by his enemies; and he dies in her arms after confessing his love. A MERRY MOURNING: A young wife longs for a beautiful black dress she has seen in a shop window. When her jealous husband is killed in a duel with a rival suitor, the widow wears the dress as her mourning gown and gaily dances with the man who, only hours before, killed her husband on the dueling grounds. CARMEN: In 1820 Seville, Carmen, a fiery cigarette girl, talks her lover, matador Don José, into joining a group of bandits and killing a man. Carmen abandons Don José for a toreador, and he confronts her outside the bullfight arena and stabs her to death.

Film Details

Also Known As
Les Collants noirs, Un, deux, trois, quatre!
Release Date
Feb 1962
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Doperfilme; Grandes Projections Cinématographiques; Joseph Kaufman; Talma Films
Distribution Company
Magna Pictures
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand (Paris, 1897) and the opera Carmen , music by Georges Bizet, libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy (Paris, 3 Mar 1875), which was based on the novella Carmen by Prosper Mérimée in La revue des deux mondes (15 Oct 1845).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.20 : 1, 2.35 : 1

Articles

Moira Shearer (1926-2006)


Her contributions to film may have been brief, but for at least one film, Michael Powell's dance opus The Red Shoes (1948), this elegant, gorgeous redhead became a film icon for her balletic performance. Sadly, that actress, Moira Shearer, died on January 31 in Oxford, England of natural causes. She was 80.

Born Moira Shearer King on January 17, 1926 in Dunfermline, Scotland. Her father, an engineer, moved the family to Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), where she was pushed into dance lessons by her mother. After the family returned to Scotland, she received lessons from the legendary Russian dance teacher Nikolai Legat. When she was just 16 she joined the Sadler's Wells Ballet and made her big national debut at 20 as Sleeping Beauty at the Royal Opera House in London.

In 1948, Powell and co-director Emeric Pressburger cast Shearer in the title role of Victoria Page, the young ballerina who sacrifices all for her career. The plot might have been a touch old fashioned, but the glorious technicolor and Robert Helpmann's florid, dazzling choreography, made this film as exciting on both sides of the Atlantic; and Shearer, complete with lucid beauty and captivating movements, a star.

After the film, Shearer returned to ballet, and following a brief U.S. tour in 1950, she made her second film, again for Powell in The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). A few more movies followed, The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955), and a third film for Powell, the notorious Peeping Tom (1960), where she meets a grisly death at the hands of a psychotic photographer (Karl Boehm). Shearer concentrated on stage work afterwards before retiring to raise a family. She is survived by her husband of 56 years, Ludovic Kennedy; a son, Alastair; and daughters, Ailsa, Rachel, and Fiona.

by Michael T. Toole
Moira Shearer (1926-2006)

Moira Shearer (1926-2006)

Her contributions to film may have been brief, but for at least one film, Michael Powell's dance opus The Red Shoes (1948), this elegant, gorgeous redhead became a film icon for her balletic performance. Sadly, that actress, Moira Shearer, died on January 31 in Oxford, England of natural causes. She was 80. Born Moira Shearer King on January 17, 1926 in Dunfermline, Scotland. Her father, an engineer, moved the family to Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), where she was pushed into dance lessons by her mother. After the family returned to Scotland, she received lessons from the legendary Russian dance teacher Nikolai Legat. When she was just 16 she joined the Sadler's Wells Ballet and made her big national debut at 20 as Sleeping Beauty at the Royal Opera House in London. In 1948, Powell and co-director Emeric Pressburger cast Shearer in the title role of Victoria Page, the young ballerina who sacrifices all for her career. The plot might have been a touch old fashioned, but the glorious technicolor and Robert Helpmann's florid, dazzling choreography, made this film as exciting on both sides of the Atlantic; and Shearer, complete with lucid beauty and captivating movements, a star. After the film, Shearer returned to ballet, and following a brief U.S. tour in 1950, she made her second film, again for Powell in The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). A few more movies followed, The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955), and a third film for Powell, the notorious Peeping Tom (1960), where she meets a grisly death at the hands of a psychotic photographer (Karl Boehm). Shearer concentrated on stage work afterwards before retiring to raise a family. She is survived by her husband of 56 years, Ludovic Kennedy; a son, Alastair; and daughters, Ailsa, Rachel, and Fiona. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Shown at the Venice Film Festival in 1960 as Un, deux, trois, quatre!; running time: 140 min. Opened in Paris in June 1962 as Les collants noirs. The first act was entitled "La croqueuse de diamants," and the third "Deuil en 24 heures."

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States September 1960

Released in United States Winter February 1962

Shown at Venice Film Festival September 1960.

Released in USA in 35mm prints.

Technirama 70

Released in United States Winter February 1962

Released in United States September 1960 (Shown at Venice Film Festival September 1960.)