The Big Picture


1h 39m 1989
The Big Picture

Brief Synopsis

A comedy about an up-and-coming filmmaker.

Film Details

Also Known As
Big Picture
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Synopsis

A comedy about an up-and-coming filmmaker.

Crew

G Roger Abell

On-Set Dresser

Richard Abramson

Executive Producer

Ismael Araujo

Grip

Nina Axelrod

Casting

Todd Badalato

Swing Gang

Sheridan Ross Batson

Driver

Debra Baumann

Assistant

Beth Bergeron

Adr Editor

Lillian Best

Negative Cutting

Patricia Billings

Assistant

Joel A Blumenau

Casting Associate

Sally Boldt

Music Editor

Suzi Bond

Craft Service

Forrest Brakeman

Boom Operator

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Frank Capra

Other

Kim Carleton

Wardrobe

Gregroy J Curda

Foley Mixer

Gary D'amico

Special Effects Coordinator

J Patrick Daily

Key Grip

Howard Davidson

Driver

Paul Deason

Assistant Director

Duane Dell'amico

Lighting Technician

Ken Deubel

Construction Coordinator

Don Devine

Camera Operator

Lily Diamond

Sound Editor

Andrea Diedrich

Storyboard Artist

John J Doherty

Rigging Gaffer

Dody Dorn

Sound Editor

Michael Dressel

Foley Editor

John Paul Fasal

Sound Effects

David Fechtor

Foley Editor

Richard A Frisch

On-Set Dresser

Rick Galbraith

Construction Coordinator

Damian Ganczewski

Production Assistant

Joseph T. Garrity

Production Designer

George Gary

Lighting Technician

David Gertz

Sound

Bess Gilbert

Casting

Edie Gorme

Song Performer

Barry Gremillion

Location Manager

Shari Griffin

Wardrobe

Christopher Guest

Screenplay

Christopher Guest

Story By

Christopher Guest

From Story

Christopher Guest

Song

Kimberly Harris

Sound Editor

Dick Haymes

Song Performer

Gary Hellerstein

Transportation Coordinator

Marlo Hellerstein

Transportation Captain

Dea E Hickox

Accounting Assistant

Cynthia E Hill

Sound

John Hoeren

Sound Editor

Jon Huck

Sound Mixer

David J Hudson

Sound

Paul Hughen

Assistant Camera Operator

Steve Humphrey

Driver

Tony Kadell

Assistant Editor

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Eric Kaz

Song

Jerie Kelter

Set Decorator

Jonathan Klein

Sound Editor

Gregory A Landis

Driver

Dwight Lavers

Dolly Grip

Blake Leyh

Sound Editor

Laura Livingston

Music

Richard Lundin

Stunt Man

Richard Lundin

Animal Wrangler

Barry Mann

Song

Burke Mattsson

Titles

William E Mceuen

Executive Producer

Kelly E Mcgowen

Assistant Camera Operator

Charles H Mcintyre

Lighting Technician

Keri L Mcintyre

Assistant Director

Michael Mckean

Song Performer

Michael Mckean

Screenplay

Michael Mckean

Song

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

Noel A Middleton

Swing Gang

Karl Miller

Animal Trainer

Michael George Miller

On-Set Dresser

Gina Monaci

Hair

Kevin Myers

Rigging Gaffer

Deana Newcomb

Photography

Stephanie Ng

Sound Editor

Martin Nicholson

Editor

David Nichtern

Music

David Nichtern

Song

Charles Norcross

Grip

Karen Patch

Costume Designer

Gary Paulsen

Driver

Marshall Peck

Production Assistant

Frederick Peterson

Assistant Editor

Barbara Pieters

Post-Production Accountant

Martha C Pilcher

Location Assistant

Kevin B Platt

Other

David Poole

Special Effects Assistant

Terry Porter

Sound

Greg Prestopino

Song

Greg Prestopino

Song Performer

Ronald J Pure

Lighting Technician

Bonnie Raitt

Song Performer

Ellen Robinson

Wardrobe

Sarah Rothenberg

Sound Editor

John Sandau

Electrician

Dennis Sands

Music

Judith Saunders

Script Supervisor

Martin Short

Other

Janelle Showalter

Sound Editor

Frank Smathers

Sound Editor

Ken Speed

Special Effects Foreman

Phillip Steuer

Property Master

Nancy Rae Stone

Production Coordinator

Jim G Sullivan

Driver

Mark Sullivan

Visual Effects

Pat Tagliaferro

Art Director

Kelly Tartan

Sound Editor

Suzanne Tenner

Photography

Woogie Thomas

Lighting Technician

Joan Thompson

Other

Mel Torme

Song

Joan Towe

Foley

Jerry Trent

Foley

James R Tynes

Gaffer

Michael C Varhol

Story By

Michael C Varhol

Producer

Michael C Varhol

From Story

Michael C Varhol

Second Unit Director

Michael C Varhol

Screenplay

Valen Watson

Associate Producer

Cynthia Weil

Song

Bob Wells

Song

Tom W West

Dolly Grip

Lizbeth Williamson

Makeup

Kelly Wimberly

Assistant Director

Thomas Winchester

Driver

Diane Witter

Production Assistant

Diane Witter

Editorial Assistant

Jennifer Zolten

Production Accountant

William Zullo

Property Master Assistant

Videos

Movie Clip

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Big Picture
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Articles

The Big Picture


A comedy about an up-and-coming filmmaker.
The Big Picture

The Big Picture

A comedy about an up-and-coming filmmaker.

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)


Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99.

The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941).

His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956).

As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace.

After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78).

The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole

Eddie Albert (1906-2005)

Eddie Albert, a versatile film and television actor whose career spanned over seven decades, and who will forever be cherished by pop culture purists for his role as Oliver Douglas, that Manhattan attorney who sought pleasures from the simple life when he bought a rundown farm in the long-running sitcom Green Acres, died of pneummonia on May 26, at his Pacific Palisades home. He was 99. The son of a real estate agent, Albert was born Edward Albert Heimberger in Rock Island, Ill., on April 22, 1906. His family relocated to Minneapolis when he was still an infant. Long entralled by theatre, he studied drama at the University of Minnesota. After years of developing his acting chops in touring companies, summer stock and a stint with a Mexican circus, he signed a contract with Warner Bros. and made his film debut in Brother Rat (1938). Although hardly a stellar early film career, he made some pleasant B-pictures, playing slap happy youths in Brother Rat and a Baby (1940), and The Wagons Roll at Night (1941). His career was interrupted for military service for World War II, and after his stint (1942-45), he came back and developed a stronger, more mature screen image: Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman (1947); Carrie (1952); his Oscar® nominated turn as the Bohemian photographer friend of Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday (1953); a charming Ali Hakim in Oklahoma (1955); and to many critics, his finest hour as an actor, when he was cast unnervingly against type as a cowardly military officer whose lack of commitment to his troops results in their deaths in Attack! (1956). As he settled into middle-age, Albert discovered belated fame when he made the move to Hooterville. For six seasons (1965-71), television viewers loved Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendal Douglas, the bemused city slicker who, along with his charming wife Lisa (Eva Gabor), takes a chance on buying a farm in the country and dealing with all the strange characters that come along their way. Of course, I'm talking about Green Acres. If he did nothing else, Alberts proved he could be a stalwart straight man in the most inane situations, and pull it off with grace. After the run of Green Acres, Albert found two of his best roles in the late stages of his career that once again cast him against his genial, good-natured persona: the fiercly overprotective father of Cybill Shepherd in The Heartbreak Kid (1972), for which he earned his second Oscar® nomination; and the sadistic warden in Robert Aldrich's raucous gridiron comedy The Longest Yard (1974). Soon, Albert was in demand again, and he had another hit series, playing a retired police officer who partners with a retired con artist (Robert Wagner) to form a detective agency in Switch (1975-78). The good roles slowed down slightly by the dawn of the '80s, both film: The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979), How to Beat the High Co$t of Living (1980), Take This Job and Shove It (1981); and television: Highway to Heaven, Murder, She Wrote, Thirtysomething, offered him little in the way of expansion. Yet, Albert spent his golden years in a most admirable fashion, he became something of activist for world health and pollution issues throughout the latter stages of his life. It is widely acknowledged that International Earth Day (April 22) is honored on his birthday for his tireless work on environemental matters. Albert was married to famed hispanic actress Margo (1945-85) until her death, and is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1989

Released in United States Fall September 15, 1989

Released in United States January 28, 1989

Released in United States November 1990

Released in United States on Video February 28, 1990

Shown at London Film Festival November 8-25, 1990.

Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (out of competition) August 24 - September 4, 1989.

Shown at United States Film Festival in Park City, Utah (out of competition) January 28, 1989.

Feature directorial debut for actor Christopher Guest.

Began shooting February 1, 1988.

Completed shooting August 1988.

Jason Gould is the son of performers Elliott Gould and Barbra Streisand.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States 1989 (Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (out of competition) August 24 - September 4, 1989.)

Released in United States January 28, 1989 (Shown at United States Film Festival in Park City, Utah (out of competition) January 28, 1989.)

Released in United States on Video February 28, 1990

Released in United States Fall September 15, 1989

Released in United States November 1990 (Shown at London Film Festival November 8-25, 1990.)