Best Of The Best II


1h 42m 1993

Brief Synopsis

Travis Brickley is killed when he loses a fight to the cruel martial arts master Brakus in an underground fight club. The fight is witnessed by Walter, the son of Travis' best friend Alex Grady. When Alex hears the news, he and his partner, Tommy Lee, decide to avenge their friend's death by defeati

Film Details

Also Known As
Best of the Best 2
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Martial Arts
Sequel
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Attila T Vari; Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Arizona, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

Travis Brickley is killed when he loses a fight to the cruel martial arts master Brakus in an underground fight club. The fight is witnessed by Walter, the son of Travis' best friend Alex Grady. When Alex hears the news, he and his partner, Tommy Lee, decide to avenge their friend's death by defeating Brackus and shutting. down the club.

Crew

Oliver Adams

Song

George Alexander

Choreographer

Molly Allen

Assistant Location Manager

Matthew Altman

On-Set Dresser

Chris M Alvarez

Foreman

Nikki Amorosino

Special Effects

Glenn E. Anderson

Driver

Pete Antico

Stunts

Maureen Arata

Casting

Bob Arnold

Stunts

Mark Asher

Carpenter

Bill Baker

Swing Gang

Brydon Bertram Baker Iii

Boom Operator

Philip Barnes

Scenic Artist

Jeffrey G Barnett

Stunts

Ron Bartlett

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Billy Barton

Stunts

Stephen L Bedell

Music Supervisor

Kirk Beebe

Stunts

Kathy Beier

Photography

William Bell

Song

Warren J Bellamy

Other

Mitchell Bergman

Transportation Coordinator

Brian Bernstein

Assistant Camera Operator

Andrea Berty

Art Department Coordinator

Dean Beville

Sound Editor

Matt Beville

Sound

John Bilka

Assistant Set Decorator

David Bishop

Electrician

Christine Bogoian

Craft Service

Rick Boomhower

Other

Beth A Boreanaz

Assistant

David Boreanaz

Props Assistant

Paul Boydston

Location Manager

Nikki Bradshaw

Costumes

Isabela Braga

Wardrobe Supervisor

Kate Brandon

Craft Service

Marilyn Brands

Wardrobe

Bruce Bridges

Camera Assistant

Terry Broadbent

Other

Allan Bromberg

Sound Editor

John Brown

Assistant Director

Steven Brown

Unit Production Manager

Kurt Bryant

Stunts

Steven Butcher

Driver

David L Butler

Camera

Gregory R Campbell

Carpenter

Robert Campbell

Scenic Artist

Rebecca Carriaga

Assistant Property Master

Michael Carter

Transportation Coordinator

Darryl Chan

Stunts

Doug Chartier

Grip

Betsy Chasse

Production Coordinator

Andrea Chesney

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Chock

Sound Editor

James Christopher

Sound Editor

Carl Ciarfalio

Stunts

Mark Coffey

Sound

Stacy Cohen

Assistant

Vidal Cohen

Production Assistant

William Conner

Other

Jerry Corker

Stunts

Danny Costa

Animal Wrangler

Keith Crawford

Production Assistant

Vince Deadrick

Stunts

Steve Delollis

Special Effects

Pat Domenico

Special Effects

David Dragan

Carpenter

Chris Drozd

Consultant

Mike Dunlap

Assistant Director

John Dunn

Sound Editor

Ezra Dweck

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

David Elliott

Construction Coordinator

David Emerson

Other

Jumi Emizawa

Assistant

Danny Epper

Stunts

Gilbert Esponza

Assistant

Rain Eventoff

Assistant

Larry Fioritto

Special Effects Coordinator

Frank Fleming

Sound Recordist

Judee Flick

Adr Editor

Stephen Hunter Flick

Sound Editor

Carol Folgate

Assistant Editor

E Chip Foody

Rigging Gaffer

David Michael Frank

Song

David Michael Frank

Music

Mark Free

Song Performer

Gary Frutkoff

Production Designer

Scott Ganary

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Nan Garcia-wood

Other

Dean Gates

Makeup Assistant

Charles Gatson

Transportation Captain

Jimmy Geoghegan

Gaffer

Frank Giustra

Executive Producer

Charles Glass

Consultant

Robert W Glass

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Juan Gonzales

Swing Gang

Galen Goodpaster

Assistant Sound Editor

Douglas Greenfield

Consultant

Brian Griffin

Other

Nancy Grossbart

Other

Richard Grove

Other

San Jose Guillermo

Welder

Mindy Hall

Makeup

Todd Hall

Other

Shari Hanger

Set Production Assistant

Tim Hannon

Carpenter

Kevin Hardy

Other

Harry Hauss

Aerial Unit

J Barry Herron

Camera

Jay Herron

Assistant Camera Operator

Dea Hickox

Script Supervisor

Paul Horn

Other

Kanin J. Howell

Stunts

William Hoy

Editor

Steve Hulin

Stunts

John Hulsman

Assistant Sound Editor

Jeff Hypp

Song

Colin D Irwin

Set Designer

Steve Irwin

Video

Mark Ivie

Stunts

Gregory Jacobs

Transportation Co-Captain

Chris Jargo

Adr Editor

Robert Jason

Song

Jeff Jensen

Stunts

Ulrika Johansson

Craft Service

Booker T. Jones

Song

John Juhasz

Accountant

John Juhasz

Production Auditor

Rick Kahana

Stunts

Dean H Kartalas

Construction

Lisa Kauppi

Music Editor

Peter R Kelsey

Music

Eugene Kerry

Dolly Grip

Praga Khan

Song

Ossama Khuluki

Foley Artist

Robert Knouse

Camera Operator

Robert Knouse

Consultant

Elliot L. Koretz

Sound Editor

Pat Krimson

Song

Peter Kuran

Visual Effects

Kevin Kutchaver

Visual Effects

David Labell

Stunts

William Lakoff

Swing Gang

Randy Lamb

Stunts

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Dave Lea

Stunts

David Lebell

Stunts

John Lee

Driver

Robert Lennon

Stunts

Charlotte Lestern

Costumes

Paul Levine

Characters As Source Material

Irving Lewis

Stunts

Vincent Lin

Stunts

Frank Lloyd

Stunts

Bert Lovitt

Editor

Steve Lubbe

Dolly Grip

Humberto Luna-gallardo

Assistant Editor

Robert Lusted

Assistant Editor

Eric Mansker

Stunts

Gary Martin

Other

Jo Martin

Editor

Karen Martinez

Assistant

Mark Masoner

Generator Operator

Bruce Mattox

Special Effects

Wes Mattox

Special Effects

Patrick Mauer

Other

Jamie Maxtone-graham

Camera Operator

Jamie Maxtone-graham

Assistant Camera Operator

Mona May

Costume Designer

John H Mccabe

Carpenter

Jeff Mccaig

Production Auditor

Justin Mccartney

Props Assistant

W Darrell Mccully

Carpenter

W Darrell Mccully

Driver

Don Mcgovern

Stunts

Jason Mckinnley

Assistant

David Mcklveen

Foreman

Jeff Mcluckie

Set Decorator

Kimi Messina

Makeup Assistant

Anne Michaud

Assistant

Voya Mikulic

Gaffer

Chris Milani

Electrician

Eric Miller

Stunts

Matthew Monzon

Makeup Assistant

David Moreno

Sound

Lloyd Moriarity

Key Grip

Bob Muse

Helicopter Pilot

Craig Muzio

Scenic Artist

Marilyn Nave

Production Coordinator

Dean Nelson

Stunts

John Allen Nelson

Screenplay

Phill Norman

Main Title Design

Eric Norris

Stunts

Thomas J O'brien

Scenic Artist

Kevin O'neill

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jeffrey G Olan

Other

Hal Olofsson

Assistant Director

Laura Onspaugh

Production Coordinator

Kim Ornitz

Sound Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
Best of the Best 2
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Martial Arts
Sequel
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Attila T Vari; Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Arizona, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)


Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71.

He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin.

For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing.

He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch.

After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies.

Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian.

A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own.

After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan.

by Michael "Mitch" Toole
Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71. He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin. For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing. He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch. After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies. Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian. A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own. After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan. by Michael "Mitch" Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video June 16, 1993

Released in United States Spring March 5, 1993

Sequel to "Best of the Best" (USA/1989), also directed by Robert Radler and starring Eric Roberts.

Began shooting March 30, 1992.

Completed shooting May 28, 1992.

Released in United States Spring March 5, 1993

Released in United States on Video June 16, 1993