Batman Returns


2h 6m 1992

Brief Synopsis

Batman's fight against The Penguin is complicated by the appearance of Catwoman.

Film Details

Also Known As
Batman - Återkomsten, Batman Regresa, Batman vuelve, Batman, le défi
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Sequel
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Synopsis

Batman is up against the Penguin, a bitter killer obsessed with Gotham's high society. To complicate matters, the mysterious Catwoman seems to be playing the game on both sides.

Crew

Jan H. Aaris

Special Effects

Rachel Abrahams

Casting Associate

Richard Alarian

Gaffer

Vanessa Theme Ament

Foley Artist

Richard L Anderson

Sound Editor

Mary Andrews

Adr Supervisor

Tim Angulo

Dp/Cinematographer

Tim Angulo

Director Of Photography

Bob Badami

Adr Mixer

Bob Badami

Editor

Don Baker

Digital Effects Supervisor

Myron Baker

Set Costumer

Paul Barrett-brown

Costume Department

Craig Barron

Visual Effects Supervisor

Steve Bartek

Music Arranger

Steve Bartek

Music Producer

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Bill Basso

Art Department

Michael Bastings

Costume Department

Jackie Baugh

Production Accountant

James Belkin

Director Of Photography

James Belkin

Dp/Cinematographer

Jennifer C. Bell

Production Coordinator

Michael J. Benavente

Sound Editor

David Beneke

Art Department

Bill Bernstein

Music Editor

Brent Boates

Visual Effects Supervisor

Brent Boates

Art Director

Larry Bolster

Other

Holly Borradaile

Associate Producer

Wendy Breck

Assistant

Richard Brown

Stunts

John Bruno

Visual Effects Supervisor

Ian Bryce

Associate Producer

Ian Bryce

Production Manager

Cheryl Budgett

Video

Dorothy Bulac

Costume Department

Len Burge Iii

Puppeteer

Don Burgess

Dp/Cinematographer

Don Burgess

Director Of Photography

Vin Burnham

Digital Effects Supervisor

Tim Burton

Producer

Eddie Burza

Set Costumer

Norman Burza

Costume Supervisor

Greg Callas

Construction Coordinator

Paul Campanella

Other

Craig Canton-largent

Puppeteer

Cheryl Carasik

Set Decorator

Roberto M Carneiro

Set Costumer

John F Carney

Lighting

John Cassidy

Key Grip

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Marjorie K Chan

Set Costumer

Wade Childress

Camera Operator

Michael Chock

Dialogue Editor

Jim Christopher

Dialogue Editor

Keith Claridge

Stage Manager

Kenneth C Clark

Special Effects

Kevin Clark

Other

Peter Clarson

Lighting Technician

Damon Cohoon

Assistant Sound Editor

Chistopher Connors

Assistant

Linda Conrad

Transportation Co-Captain

Doug Corring

Dga Trainee

Carla Corwin

Assistant Director

Joe Coscia

Hair Stylist

Mitchell Coughlin

Art Department

Philip Crescenzo

Technical Supervisor

Carolyn Crittenden

Assistant Producer

Charlie Croughwell

Stunt Coordinator

Joshua Cushner

Motion Control

Stefan Czapsky

Director Of Photography

Stefan Czapsky

Dp/Cinematographer

Robin D'arcy

Line Producer

Jeff Dash

Assistant Production Accountant

Kenny Davis

Dolly Grip

Richard Davison

Art Department

Jon Dawe

Other

Robert Dawson

Main Title Design

Barry Dempsey

Animator

Patrick Denver

Miniatures

John Desjardin

Video

George Dodge

Director Of Photography

George Dodge

Dp/Cinematographer

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Marilyn Dozer-chaney

Art Department

Tom Duffield

Art Director

Kevin Duncan

Assistant Director

John Dunn

Sound Editor

Antoine Durr

Video

Elaine Edford

Visual Effects Supervisor

Drummand A Edmand

Camera Assistant

Mike Edmonson

Special Effects Foreman

Jeff Edwards

Puppeteer

Danny Elfman

Music Producer

Danny Elfman

Song

Danny Elfman

Music

Andy Evans

Special Effects

Christopher Evans

Matte Painter

Julia Evershade

Sound Editor

Alli Eynon

Costume Department

Greg Figiel

Art Department

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects Supervisor

Carl Fischer

Boom Operator

Ashley Fleming

Assistant

Stephen Hunter Flick

Dialogue Editor

Brian Flora

Matte Painter

Don Fly

Other

Scott Forbes

Special Effects

Bruce L. Fowler

Other

Christine C Fransen

Assistant

Nathalie Fratti

Art Department

Vaune Kirby Frechette

Assistant Editor

Jenny Fulle

Line Producer

Rick Galinson

Other

Jessica Gallavan

Adr Editor

Michael R Gannon

Assistant Property Master

Lee Garibaldi

Transportation Captain

Chuck Gaspar

Special Effects Supervisor

Dan Gaspar

Special Effects

Bryson Gerard

Visual Effects

Gary Gero

Animal Trainer

Scott Giegler

Video

Nansea Lee Goldberg

Assistant

Joseph Goldstein

Video

Bob Gorlick

Camera Operator

David Grasso

Art Department

Ron Gress

Visual Effects

Oda Groeschel

Costume Supervisor

Peter Guber

Executive Producer

Rhonda Gunner

Visual Effects

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Stephen Hague

Song

Robert S Hahn

Camera Operator

Warren Hamilton

Sound Editor

Sam Hamm

Story By

Sam Hamm

From Story

Alan Harding

Camera

Bret Harding

Assistant Camera Operator

Beth Hathaway

Art Department

Rich Haugen

Other

Rick Heinrichs

Art Director

Erik Henry

Effects Coordinator

Rob Hinderstein

Art Department

Petur Hliddal

Sound Mixer

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Richard Hoffenberg

Foreman

Richard Hollander

Visual Effects

Elmer Hui

Special Effects

Ian Hunter

Visual Effects

Jill Jacobs

Other

Paul James

Costume Department

Rick James

Song

Derek Johansen

Assistant

Don Johnson

Props

Adam Jones

Art Department

Michael Joyce

Visual Effects

Mark Jurinko

Art Department

Alec Kamp

Other

Bob Kane

Consultant

Bob Kane

Characters As Source Material

Sandra Kaufman

Assistant Editor

Tom Keefer

Best Boy

Jamie Kehoe

Craft Service

Ian C Kelly

Video

Max Kleven

Stunt Coordinator

Bill Klinger

Special Effects Foreman

Andy Kopra

Video

Neil Krepela

Dp/Cinematographer

Neil Krepela

Director Of Photography

Richard Joseph Landon

Other

Dave Lea

Stunts

Chris Lebenzon

Editor

Norma Lee

Hair Stylist

Joshua Levinson

Assistant

Stanley Liu

Video

Mark Lohff

Production Coordinator

Kathy Long

Stunts

Dennis J Lootens

Rigging Gaffer

Barry Lopez

Other

Barbara Lorenz

Hair Stylist

Andrea Losch

Animator

Shane Mahan

Makeup

Gregory Manion

Other

Steve Maslow

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Karen Mason

Puppeteer

Mary Mason

Costume Department

Bill Mather

Matte Painter

Martin Matzinger

Production Coordinator

Tommy May

Key Grip

Richard F Mays

Assistant Art Director

Kaye Mccall

Assistant Production Accountant

Mark Mccreery

Makeup

Karin L Mcgaughey

Artistic Advisor

David Mcgiffert

Assistant Director

Patti Mcguire

Assistant

Rich Mckay

Camera Assistant

Mark Mckenzie

Original Music

Gregory L Mcmurry

Visual Effects

Tara Meaney-crocito

Production Coordinator

Film Details

Also Known As
Batman - Återkomsten, Batman Regresa, Batman vuelve, Batman, le défi
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Sequel
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 6m

Award Nominations

Best Makeup

1992

Best Visual Effects

1992

Articles

Batman Returns


After the runaway success of Tim Burton's first Caped Crusader movie, Batman (1989), a sequel seemed like a sure bet, at least in the minds of executives at Warner Brothers, which owned the franchise. But Burton had to be talked into coming back for another stab at the legendary comic book character. In fact, his first public reaction to the suggestion of a sequel was that it was "a dumbfounded idea." The studio persisted, and he finally relented, but only after getting the script he wanted. Although there were plenty of characters and plot threads that could have been carried over from the first movie, Burton wanted an entirely fresh approach in Batman Returns (1992), with an opportunity to create another Batman story from square one. After a disappointing first draft by the first movie's writer, Sam Hamm, which had the Penguin and Catwoman teaming up in a quest for hidden treasure, producers brought in Daniel Waters, whose black comic take on the cult hit Heathers (1989) was certain to be more in tune with Burton's sensibilities. Waters came up with a social satire that had an evil business mogul named Max Shreck (a homage to actor Max Schreck who created the vampire role in Nosferatu, 1922) backing a bid by the Penguin for the Gotham City mayor's office. Waters also gave Catwoman a more ferocious background, with psycho-sexual overtones and a contemporary feminist slant.

Burton needed more than a new script, however, to be sold on the project. He also required a completely new look, abandoning the idea of working in England on Anton Furst's still existing sets from the first movie and hiring production designer Bo Welch, who had designed the director's earlier features Beetlejuice (1988) and Edward Scissorhands (1990). Burton also secured the services of a large number of King Penguins, which had to be flown from England in a refrigerated plane and kept happy and healthy with a refrigerated trailer, a swimming pool stocked daily with a half ton of ice, and a daily delivery of fresh fish.

Michael Keaton was also not a shoe-in to return as the Dark Knight until the studio offered him a substantially larger salary. With the new script, Keaton was also able to bring deeper shades of anger and neurosis to Batman's alter-ego Bruce Wayne. Presumably, the greater acting opportunities and bigger pay helped assuage the fact that with so much focus on the over-the-top Penguin and Catwoman characters, the title role was almost a supporting player in his own story.

Burton wanted to cast Marlon Brando as the Penguin, but this was nixed by the studio (which preferred Dustin Hoffman) and most vehemently by Batman creator Bob Kane. Consideration was also given to Christopher Lloyd when the character bore a closer resemblance to the tuxedoed dandy familiar from the Batman TV series. When Burton and Waters redrew the character to be a deformed, vengeful half-human/half-bird villain, attention turned to Danny DeVito. He, too, was initially reluctant but consented after talking with pal Jack Nicholson, for whom the Joker role in the first movie was a major financial windfall. DeVito threw himself into the part despite the hours of make-up required to make him the Penguin and a level of secrecy surrounding the character's look that prevented DeVito from discussing it even with his family.

Michelle Pfeiffer was also not the first choice to play Catwoman. Annette Bening was signed but had to drop out when she became pregnant. Julie Newmar, one of three actresses to play the role in the TV show, reportedly lobbied for the part, despite being close to 60. Tense moments were caused when Sean Young showed up at the Warner Brothers lot to pursue the job. Young was originally cast as Vicki Vale in the first film, but after breaking her collar bone in an on-set accident, she was replaced by Kim Basinger. In the early 90s Young had a reputation for difficult, erratic behavior, so when she showed up at the studio in a Catwoman costume, producers went to great lengths to avoid her and Burton allegedly hid under his desk. It was reported that Lena Olin and Madonna were also briefly in the running, but Pfeiffer was finally signed for the part at $3 million, $2 million more than Bening's asking price.

Burgess Meredith, who played the Penguin on the TV series, was asked to play the character's father in the opening of the film but illness prevented him from it. Burton then brought in two of the stars of his feature debut, Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Paul "Pee-wee Herman" Reubens and Diane Salinger, to play the character's parents.

Batman Returns garnered some good reviews and a number of nominations and awards but ran into controversy, and some diminishment of box office, when parental groups complained of its violence and sexual innuendo. The McDonald's fast food chain caught the most flak because they were giving away Batman Returns toys in their child-oriented Happy Meals.

Director: Tim Burton
Producers: Denise Di Novi, Tim Burton

Screenplay: Daniel Waters, Sam Hamm, based on characters created by Bob Kane

Cinematography: Stefan Czapsky
Editing: Bob Badami, Chris Lebenzon
Production Design: Bo Welch
Art Direction: Rick Heinrichs
Original Music: Danny Elfman, Steven Severin (song "Face to Face")
Cast: Michael Keaton (Batman/Bruce Wayne), Michelle Pfeiffer (Catwoman/Selina), Danny DeVito (Penguin), Christopher Walken (Max Shreck), Michael Gough (Alfred).
C-122m. Letterboxed.

by Rob Nixon
Batman Returns

Batman Returns

After the runaway success of Tim Burton's first Caped Crusader movie, Batman (1989), a sequel seemed like a sure bet, at least in the minds of executives at Warner Brothers, which owned the franchise. But Burton had to be talked into coming back for another stab at the legendary comic book character. In fact, his first public reaction to the suggestion of a sequel was that it was "a dumbfounded idea." The studio persisted, and he finally relented, but only after getting the script he wanted. Although there were plenty of characters and plot threads that could have been carried over from the first movie, Burton wanted an entirely fresh approach in Batman Returns (1992), with an opportunity to create another Batman story from square one. After a disappointing first draft by the first movie's writer, Sam Hamm, which had the Penguin and Catwoman teaming up in a quest for hidden treasure, producers brought in Daniel Waters, whose black comic take on the cult hit Heathers (1989) was certain to be more in tune with Burton's sensibilities. Waters came up with a social satire that had an evil business mogul named Max Shreck (a homage to actor Max Schreck who created the vampire role in Nosferatu, 1922) backing a bid by the Penguin for the Gotham City mayor's office. Waters also gave Catwoman a more ferocious background, with psycho-sexual overtones and a contemporary feminist slant. Burton needed more than a new script, however, to be sold on the project. He also required a completely new look, abandoning the idea of working in England on Anton Furst's still existing sets from the first movie and hiring production designer Bo Welch, who had designed the director's earlier features Beetlejuice (1988) and Edward Scissorhands (1990). Burton also secured the services of a large number of King Penguins, which had to be flown from England in a refrigerated plane and kept happy and healthy with a refrigerated trailer, a swimming pool stocked daily with a half ton of ice, and a daily delivery of fresh fish. Michael Keaton was also not a shoe-in to return as the Dark Knight until the studio offered him a substantially larger salary. With the new script, Keaton was also able to bring deeper shades of anger and neurosis to Batman's alter-ego Bruce Wayne. Presumably, the greater acting opportunities and bigger pay helped assuage the fact that with so much focus on the over-the-top Penguin and Catwoman characters, the title role was almost a supporting player in his own story. Burton wanted to cast Marlon Brando as the Penguin, but this was nixed by the studio (which preferred Dustin Hoffman) and most vehemently by Batman creator Bob Kane. Consideration was also given to Christopher Lloyd when the character bore a closer resemblance to the tuxedoed dandy familiar from the Batman TV series. When Burton and Waters redrew the character to be a deformed, vengeful half-human/half-bird villain, attention turned to Danny DeVito. He, too, was initially reluctant but consented after talking with pal Jack Nicholson, for whom the Joker role in the first movie was a major financial windfall. DeVito threw himself into the part despite the hours of make-up required to make him the Penguin and a level of secrecy surrounding the character's look that prevented DeVito from discussing it even with his family. Michelle Pfeiffer was also not the first choice to play Catwoman. Annette Bening was signed but had to drop out when she became pregnant. Julie Newmar, one of three actresses to play the role in the TV show, reportedly lobbied for the part, despite being close to 60. Tense moments were caused when Sean Young showed up at the Warner Brothers lot to pursue the job. Young was originally cast as Vicki Vale in the first film, but after breaking her collar bone in an on-set accident, she was replaced by Kim Basinger. In the early 90s Young had a reputation for difficult, erratic behavior, so when she showed up at the studio in a Catwoman costume, producers went to great lengths to avoid her and Burton allegedly hid under his desk. It was reported that Lena Olin and Madonna were also briefly in the running, but Pfeiffer was finally signed for the part at $3 million, $2 million more than Bening's asking price. Burgess Meredith, who played the Penguin on the TV series, was asked to play the character's father in the opening of the film but illness prevented him from it. Burton then brought in two of the stars of his feature debut, Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Paul "Pee-wee Herman" Reubens and Diane Salinger, to play the character's parents. Batman Returns garnered some good reviews and a number of nominations and awards but ran into controversy, and some diminishment of box office, when parental groups complained of its violence and sexual innuendo. The McDonald's fast food chain caught the most flak because they were giving away Batman Returns toys in their child-oriented Happy Meals. Director: Tim Burton Producers: Denise Di Novi, Tim Burton Screenplay: Daniel Waters, Sam Hamm, based on characters created by Bob Kane Cinematography: Stefan Czapsky Editing: Bob Badami, Chris Lebenzon Production Design: Bo Welch Art Direction: Rick Heinrichs Original Music: Danny Elfman, Steven Severin (song "Face to Face") Cast: Michael Keaton (Batman/Bruce Wayne), Michelle Pfeiffer (Catwoman/Selina), Danny DeVito (Penguin), Christopher Walken (Max Shreck), Michael Gough (Alfred). C-122m. Letterboxed. by Rob Nixon

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video October 21, 1992

Released in United States Summer June 19, 1992

Sequel to "Batman" (USA/1989), directed by Tim Burton and starring Michael Keaton, Jack Nicholson, and Kim Basinger.

Due to her pregnancy, Annette Bening was replaced by Michelle Pfeiffer in the role of Catwoman.

Began shooting September 3, 1991.

Completed shooting February 20, 1992.

Released in United States Summer June 19, 1992

Released in United States on Video October 21, 1992