Bank Robber


1h 35m 1993

Brief Synopsis

In an attempt to impress an unfaithful girlfriend, a young bank robber must hide out in a hotel where he is visited by various characters.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Brian Kingman; Ron Peabody
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

In an attempt to impress an unfaithful girlfriend, a young bank robber must hide out in a hotel where he is visited by various characters.

Crew

Christopher Ahern

Grip

Waide Allen

Gaffer

Dana Allyson

Costume Designer

Mario Andretti

Driver

Kristan Andrews

Art Department Coordinator

Patti Arpaia

Photography

Bryan Azorsky

Dialogue Editor

William Babington

Assistant Editor

Carol Banker

Script Supervisor

Rhonda Bedikian

Music Supervisor

Chuck Borden

Stunt Coordinator

David Bourla

Production Assistant

Harry C Box

Best Boy

Sarah Brady

Adr Editor

John Brasher

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Giani Brill

Transportation

Bennie R Brothers

Camera Operator

Joey D Brown

Electrician

Chuck Buch

Sound Mixer

Claudia Buchanan

Production Assistant

Karen Burka

Art Assistant

James Burkhart

Scenic Artist

Bryan Cahill

Boom Operator

G Smokey Campbell

Other

Jon Caradies

Other

Jean Cazes

Executive Producer

Lila Cazes

Producer

Scott Chambliss

Production Designer

Andrew Chavez

Art Assistant

Donald Chong

Grip

Jeffrey N Civa

Driver

T G Cody

Grip

Todd Coe

Casting Associate

David Cole

Carpenter

Paul Colichman

Executive Producer

Mark Collins

Driver

Miles A Copeland Iii

Executive Producer

Stewart Copeland

Music

Julian Coutts

Art Assistant

M Curley

Song

K David

Song

Liz Davis

Assistant

Jamie Day

Production Assistant

David Decoteau

Special Thanks To

Peter Scott Delano

Carpenter

Darren Demetre

Video Assist/Playback

Darren Demetre

Production Assistant

Darren Demetre

Assistant Director

Stephen Denizot

Carpenter

John V Detroia

Driver

Michael Dittrick

Music Editor

Mark Doering-powell

Camera Assistant

John Dorsett

Electrician

Henry Duarte

Special Thanks To

Scott Duarte

Props Assistant

Alex Dunlop

Office Assistant

Guy Duquette

Driver

David Esparza

Scenic Artist

Mark E Feldgreber

Electrician

Chris Fields

Production Assistant

Vince Foglio

Art Assistant

Will Fowler

Video

R Fox

Song

Andrea A Friedland

Assistant Director

Lorraine Genovese

Art Assistant

Bryan Gladstone

Other

Michael Gorman

Scenic Artist

Paul Grindrod

Other

Paul Grindrod

Key Grip

John Grissom

Grip

Barry E Gross

Electrician

L Guiterrez

Song

Cyrille Margaux Gulassa

Assistant Set Dresser

Anthony D Guzman

Grip

Sarah Hackett

Assistant Costume Designer

Antknee Hall

Best Boy

Linda Hardy

Makeup

Mary Cristin Harrigan

Electrician

John Hartigan

Special Effects Supervisor

Gary Hashimoto

Props

Eric Hoeschen

Foley Mixer

John Howard

Assistant Editor

Maysie Hoy

Editor

Idiko Hutkoff

Makeup Assistant

Lisa Johnson

Office Assistant

Alan Jones

Other

David E Jones

Carpenter

Jennifer Joos

Art Assistant

F Jorio

Song

Brian Kingman

Production Insurance

Louise Kobrak

Craft Service

Eric Kramer

Electrician

Alletta Y L Kriak

Assistant

David Kyllonen

Transportation

Larry Larson

Effects Assistant

Johnna Levine

Other

Christopher Loring

Electrician

Rob Lowbel

Electrician

Terry Luce

Driver

Diana Malinova-kardos

Art Assistant

Laurence Manly

Camera Assistant

Laurence Manly

Assistant Camera Operator

Karen Manthey

Set Decorator

Adriane Marfiak

Sound Effects Editor

Joe Martinez

Driver

John Massaro

Electrician

Mark Matthews

Office Assistant

Ray Maxwell

Carpenter

Nick Mead

Screenplay

Veronika Merlin

Other

Ron Messano

Transportation

Kristen A Messina

On-Set Dresser

Eric Miller

Other

Eric Miller

Transportation Coordinator

Gary Molyneux

Other

Ray Morfino

Color Timer

Blake Moulin

Music

Andy Napell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Shawn Neary

Grip

Roy Nigra

Best Boy Grip

Katie Nilson

Electrician

Bradley Novicoff

Office Assistant

Gerry O'malley

Assistant Camera Operator

John O'malley

Driver

Todd Orr

Sound Effects Editor

Ken Osnes

Art Assistant

Todd D Parker

Electrician

Allen Parr

Dolly Grip

Ron Peabody

Production Insurance

Suzie Pelissier

Assistant Director

Donald Paul Pemrick

Casting

Randolph Pitts

Other

Daniel W Porteous

Driver

Mary Protzko

Office Assistant

Doug Reed

Foley Editor

Andrew Rhodes

Other

Ian Robichaud

Electrician

J.b. Rogers

Assistant Director

Thomas C Rude

Construction Coordinator

Dean Sadler

Hair

Steven Sands

Art Assistant

Ray Savage

Office Assistant

John Schouweiler

Production Manager

John Schouweiler

Line Producer

Dana Seely

Art Assistant

Jeff Seitz

Music

Andrzej Sekula

Director Of Photography

Scott Sener

Carpenter

David J Seropian

Production Assistant

Mike Shaw

Grip

Alan Sherrod

Director Of Photography

Patrick Shiffrar

Driver

Gregory C Smith

Assistant Camera Operator

Karen Spencer

Production Auditor

David Stein

Driver

David Stein

Other

Lauren Stephens

Dialogue Editor

Julie Sterner

Wardrobe

Andrew M Stewart

Post-Production Supervisor

Michael Stocks

Key Grip

Lance Hyatt Suder

Production Coordinator

Claudia Temby

Other

Jonas Thaler

Production Consultant

The Del Rubio Triplets

Song Performer

Andrew A Thurman

Other

Scott Toland

Electrician

James Toscas

Special Thanks To

Vance Trussell

Gaffer

Harry Vasavada

Other

Michael Vatovec

Scenic Artist

David Waine

Effects Assistant

Andy Waldron

Electrician

Warner Drive Warehouse

Other

Harold Welb

Other

Vanessa Welch

Makeup

Richard Westover

Editor

William Whyte

Carpenter

Seth Willenson

Consultant

David D B Wilson

Transportation Captain

Paul Wilson

Location Manager

Bradley P Wisham

Art Director

Aaron Woolf

Electrician

Deron Wright

Other

Richard K Wright

Property Master

E Wynne

Song

Gina Zappala

Assistant Editor

Adam Zerkel

Other

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Brian Kingman; Ron Peabody
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole
Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 10, 1993

Released in United States on Video July 27, 1994

Released in United States September 1993

Released in United States Winter December 3, 1993

Shown at Boston Film Festival September 13-23, 1993.

Began shooting November 9, 1992.

Completed shooting December 15, 1992.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States on Video July 27, 1994

Released in United States September 1993 (Shown at Boston Film Festival September 13-23, 1993.)

Released in United States Winter December 3, 1993

Released in United States December 10, 1993 (Los Angeles, New York City, Chicago and Cleveland)