Bad Company


1h 48m 1995

Brief Synopsis

An out-of-favor CIA agent infiltrates an industrial espionage ring and is seduced by its female mastermind.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

An out-of-favor CIA agent infiltrates an industrial espionage ring and is seduced by its female mastermind.

Crew

John Adams

Best Boy

Janice Alexander

Other

Janice Alexander

Craft Service

Michelle Allen

Location Casting

Bernadine M Anderson

Makeup Artist

Dave Anderson

Gaffer

Neal Anderson

Dialogue Consultant

Scott Ansell

Music

Deborah Aquila

Casting

David K Arnold

Production Assistant

Bob Baron

Adr Mixer

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Artist

Bob Beher

Foley

Wayne Bennett

Assistant Director

Howard Berger

Makeup

Richard Birch

Song

John L Brown

Dolly Grip

Carter Burwell

Music

Barney Cabral

Adr Supervisor

Warren Carr

Unit Production Manager

Warren Carr

Associate Producer

Jeffrey Chernov

Producer

Lana Chirco

Hair Stylist

Mel Christensen

Foreman

Marco Ciccone

Assistant Camera Operator

Barbara Clayden

Costumes

Jessica Clothier

Script Supervisor

Graham Coutts

Property Master

Doug Craik

Assistant Camera Operator

David Crone

Camera Operator

David Crone

Steadicam Operator

Brian Daly

Song

Charles Decaro

Costume Designer

Victoria Down

Makeup Artist

Bill Draper

Production Supervisor

Michael Farrow

Music

Dominic Fidelibus

Other

Jim Filippone

Helicopter Pilot

Frank Fitzpatrick

Song

Frank Fitzpatrick

Music Supervisor

Anthony Giacinti

Boom Operator

Virginia Giritlian

Assistant

Gill Goodman

Assistant Property Master

Alec L Gould

Accounting Assistant

Marilyn Graf

Foley Mixer

Jack N Green

Director Of Photography

Lenore Mcvety Gregory

Accounting Assistant

Jane Groves

Assistant Set Decorator

Nicholas Hallam

Song

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Laura Harris

Dialogue Editor

William Heslup

Art Director

Ellen Heuer

Foley Artist

Amy Hoffberg

Sound Effects Editor

Tim Hogan

Key Grip

Desne Holland

Makeup Artist

Scott Irvine

Transportation Coordinator

Ernie Jackson

Stunt Coordinator

Gregory Jackson

Assistant Location Manager

Neva Jakich

Assistant

Ron James

Transportation Captain

Kirk Johns

Location Manager

Jacqueline A Jordan

Assistant Director

Gloria Kaiser

Color Timer

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Patrick Kearns

On-Set Dresser

David Kneupper

Sound Editor

Robert Komatsu

Assistant Editor

Daniel S Kudart

Assistant

Peter J Lehman

Sound Effects Editor

Wendy Lewis

Production Coordinator

Julie Lichter

Casting Associate

Robert J Litt

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Avo Liva

Other

Drew Locke

Other

Deshanta Marsden

Sound Editor

Coreen Mayrs

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Andrew Mcalpine

Production Designer

Noel Mckoy

Song Performer

Noel Mckoy

Song

Brian Mcpherson

Sound Effects Editor

Travis Meck

Audio

Anthony Miceli

Audio

John Miceli

Audio

Isaac Mizrahi

Other

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Tish Monaghan

Costume Designer

Glenn T Morgan

Sound Editor

Robert Murdoch

Production Assistant

Peter Murray

Helicopter Pilot

Barbara Nahlick

Music Contractor

Gene Norman

Song

Koa Padolsky

Other

Paisley Pappe

Associate Editor

Stuart H Pappe

Editor

Adam Pertofsky

Post-Production Assistant

Tony E Poulsen

Boom Operator

Ken Rabehl

Assistant Art Director

Alan Rapaport

Song

Matt Reddy

Lead Set Dresser

Luke Reichle

Assistant Costume Designer

David W Rose

Assistant Director

Greg P. Russell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Wendie Saltarski

Production Accountant

Mark Sandman

Song

Erik Norse Sanko

Music

Elizabeth Schmidt

Assistant Editor

Takashi Seida

Photography

Patrick N Sellers

Dialogue Editor

Beverly Sewers

Hair Stylist

Jane Shannon

Casting Associate

Richard Shissler

Costume Designer

Randy Shymkiw

Special Effects Coordinator

Margaret Sinkie

Production Assistant

Adam Milo Smalley

Music Editor

Lydia Stante

Assistant

Robert L Stevenson

Hair Stylist

Larry Sutton

Sound Mixer

Michelle Tadege

Assistant Production Coordinator

Dave Tarris

Assistant Location Manager

Crispin Taylor

Song

Ross Thomas

Screenplay

Elizabeth Tobin-kurtz

Sound

David Torn

Music

Wayne Toth

Makeup

Elliot Tyson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Amedeo Ursini

Producer

Shirley Walker

Original Music

Kenneth Wells

Other

Thomas Wells

Construction Coordinator

Elizabeth Wilcox

Set Decorator

Jori Woodman

Costumes

Ken Woznow

Dolly Grip

Alan Zenuk

Photography

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1995

Released in United States on Video July 11, 1995

Released in United States Winter January 20, 1995

Wide Release in United States January 20, 1995

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Los Angeles February 23 - March 3, 1995.

Began shooting August 12, 1993.

Completed shooting October 16, 1993.

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Los Angeles February 23 - March 3, 1995.)

Released in United States Winter January 20, 1995

Wide Release in United States January 20, 1995

Released in United States on Video July 11, 1995