Back To School


1h 37m 1986

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Wisconsin, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Crew

Thomas Ackerman

Dp/Cinematographer

Thomas Ackerman

Director Of Photography

Will Aldis

Screenplay

Julia Alexander

Technical Advisor

Vanessa Theme Ament

Foley

Sandy Ampon

Costumes

Pete Antico

Stunts

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Gregory J Barnett

Stunts

J C Bartlett

Song

Dustin Bernard

Assistant Director

Bert Berns

Song

Dick Bernstein

Music Editor

Michael Bolton

Song

Michael Bolton

Song Performer

Jean-claude Bonnardot

Production Assistant

Gary Bourgeois

Sound

Neil Brody

Sound

Todd Bryant

Stunts

Douglas Burdinski

Production Associate

Dana Burgess

Stunts

Neil Burrow

Sound Editor

Harold Burton

Stunts

Bobby Caldwell

Song

Bobby Caldwell

Song Performer

Joe Camp

Production Assistant

Chris Carpenter

Sound Effects

Enrico Caruso

Song Performer

Ellis Cohen

Costume Supervisor

Robert P Cohen

Assistant Director

Steven Cohen

Assistant Director

Jude Cole

Song Performer

C Cory

Song

Dan Curry

Main Title Design

Hallie D'amore

Makeup Supervisor

Rodney Dangerfield

Story By

Rodney Dangerfield

Screenplay

Rodney Dangerfield

From Story

Rodney Dangerfield

Song Performer

Gordon Davidson

Sound Editor

Gordon Davidson

Sound Editor

Justin Derosa

Stunts

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

David Draves

Stunts

Danny Elfman

Music

Danny Elfman

Song

Tom Elliott

Stunts

Estelle Endler

Executive Producer

Michael Endler

Executive Producer

Gary Epper

Stunts

Richard Epper

Stunts

Greg Fields

From Story

Greg Fields

Story By

Aretha Franklin

Song Performer

Randy Goodrum

Song

Mark S Gordon

Sound Editor

Allan Gornick

Photography

Allan Graf

Stunts

Carlos A Herzer

Stunts

Hilda Hodges

Foley

Bill Hooker

Stunts

Hugh Hooker

Stunts

Steve Husch

On-Set Dresser

Gary Hymes

Stunts

Phillip Ingram

Song Performer

Caro Jones

Casting

Fred Judkins

Sound Editor

Steven Kampmann

Screenplay

James J Klinger

Sound Editor

Douglas Knapp

Camera Operator

Douglas H Knapp

Camera Operator

Michael Lantieri

Special Effects Supervisor

Mark Leonard

Song

Mark Lindout

Stunts

Michael Looney

Assistant Director

Kathy Lymberopoulos

Production Associate

Jim Mantrell

Stunts

Anderson Martin

Stunts

Cass Martin

Location Manager

Abbe Masel

Stunts

Jim Matheny

Sound Editor

Tom Mccarthy

Sound Editor

Tom Mccown

On-Set Dresser

Don Charles Mcgovern

Stunts

Mary Mclaglen

Production Coordinator

Phil Medley

Song

John C. Meier

Stunts

Frederick Moore

Camera Operator

Timothy J Moran

Special Effects Assistant

William Nelson

Sound

Lennie Niehaus

Music

Joseph M O'har

Location Manager

Pam O'har

Location Manager

William Oliver

Stunts

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Mike Ostavich

Stunts

Wayne Perkins

Song

Linda Goldner Perry

Music Supervisor

Manny Perry

Stunts

Janna Phillips

Makeup Assistant

Chuck Picerni Jr.

Stunts

Steve Picerni

Stunts

Regi Plummer

Production Assistant

Will Porter

Screenplay

Harold Ramis

Executive Producer

Harold Ramis

Screenplay

David Rawlins

Second Unit Director

David Rawlins

Editor

Otis Redding

Song

Carol Rees

Stunts

Cyndi Lee Rice

Stunts

Kenneth Rissien

Lighting Technician

Melanie Roy

Production Assistant

Michael Runyard

Stunts

Chuck Russell

Producer

Chuck Russell

Production Manager

David Russell

Production

Edmund Silkaitis

Set Designer

Spike Silver

Stunts

Melissa Skoff

Casting

Dennis Snee

From Story

Dennis Snee

Story By

David L Snyder

Production Designer

Jerald B Sobul

Assistant Director

Curtis Stone

Song Performer

Janet Stout

Costumes

Peter Torokvei

Screenplay

Don S Walden

Sound Editor

Dan Walter

Stunts

William Watts

Production Assistant

Dean Wein

Stunts

Burt Weinstein

Adr Editor

Frederick White

Lighting Technician

Scott Wilder

Stunts

Richard Wolf

Song

Durinda Wood

Costume Designer

Dick Ziker

Stunt Coordinator

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Wisconsin, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)


Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82.

He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy.

His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno.

Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star.

His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world.

His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this.

He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie.

by Michael T. Toole
Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82. He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy. His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno. Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star. His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world. His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this. He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1986

Began shooting October 14, 1985.

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1986