Bachelor Party


1h 46m 1984

Brief Synopsis

A guy's buddies throw him a bachelor party to end all bachelor parties in a ritzy hotel penthouse suite.

Film Details

Also Known As
Svensexan
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Synopsis

A guy's buddies throw him a bachelor party to end all bachelor parties in a ritzy hotel penthouse suite.

Crew

Michael Adams

Stunts

Robert Alsheimer

Sound Editor

Martin Becker

Special Effects

William Berry

Song

Mark Billerman

Set Designer

Peter Borck

Production Assistant

Mary Brando

Makeup

Peter Buck

Song

Richard Butler

Stunts

Denzel Cameron

Animal Trainer

David E Campbell

Sound

Alex Carlin

Song

Phil Chong

Stunts

Wang Chung

Song Performer

Kevin Colin

Art Director

Gil Combs

Stunts

Buddy R Cone

Costumes

Stewart Copeland

Song

Yip Yip Coyote

Song Performer

Everett Creach

Stunts

Miriam Cutler

Song

Ann-marie D'angelo

Makeup

Gautam Das

Associate Producer

Tommy Dunbar

Song

Bob Dunn

Animal Trainer

Joe Dunne

Stunt Coordinator

Exa Durham

Production Coordinator

Danny Elfman

Song

Gary Epper

Stunts

Carl Evans

Song

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Joel Fein

Sound

Robert Folk

Music

B D Fox

Titles

Linda Franklin

Stunts

James Gillespie

Makeup

Danny Goldberg

Music Supervisor

Jools Holland

Song Performer

Jools Holland

Song

Larry Holt

Stunts

Jack Hues

Song

Frank Inez

Special Effects

Bob Israel

Story By

Bob Israel

From Story

Bob Israel

Producer

Neal Israel

Screenplay

Tom Jenkins

Music

Ann Kindberg

Unit Production Manager

Kathleen Knapp

Choreographer

Shawn Lane

Stunts

Richard Leeman

Sound Editor

Darlene Love

Song Performer

Jeanne Mascia

Costumes

Laurie Mayer

Song

Eddie Mcdonald

Song

Michael Mills

Song

John Moio

Stunts

Ron Moler

Producer

Tom Morga

Stunts

Scott Norris

Production Assistant

William Orbit

Song

Nina Padovano

Wardrobe Supervisor

Conrad Palmisano

Stunts

Victor Paul

Stunts

Mike Peters

Song

Diane Peterson

Stunts

Stephen L Posey

Camera Operator

Martin Price

Art Director

Pat Proft

Screenplay

John T Reitz

Sound

Dar Robinson

Stunts

George Robotham

Stunts

John Robotham

Stunts

Joe Roth

Executive Producer

Binnie Ruben

Location Manager

Gregg Rudloff

Sound

George Marshall Ruge

Stunts

Richard Sawyer

Consultant

Barry Schleifer

Music

John Seabury

Song

Timothy R Sexton

Music Supervisor

Tobias Shapiro

Production Assistant

Ken Sher

Special Effects

Jerry Sobul

Assistant Director

Sting

Song

Michael Stipe

Song

Keith Streng

Song

Neal Suhrstedt

Screenplay

Peggy Teague

Makeup

Timothy Jamahli Thomas

Song

Timothy Jamahli Thomas

Song Performer

Mike Tillman

Stunts

Susumu Tokunow

Sound

Torchsong

Song Performer

Hal Trussell

Dp/Cinematographer

Hal Trussell

Director Of Photography

John Ufland

Video

Tom Villano

Music Editor

Harvey Waldman

Assistant Director

Tom Walls

Editor

Mike Washlake

Stunts

Brian J. Williams

Stunts

Ted Witus

Titles

Peter Zaremba

Song

Dick Ziker

Stunts

Adrian Zmed

Song Performer

Film Details

Also Known As
Svensexan
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Articles

Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)


Wendie Jo Sperber, the zany comic actress who had appeared on several movies and sitcoms since the late '70s, died on November 29 of breast cancer at her Sherman Oaks home. She was 47.

Born on September 18, 1958 in Hollywood, California, Sperber made an impression from the beginning when, at just 19 years of age, she was cast as Rosie Petrofsky, the hyperactive, dreamy-eyed Beatle fan who will stop at nothing to see them on their Ed Sullivan debut in the charming Robert Zemeckis' period comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978). The film was a surprise smash in the Spring of '78, and she proved that her comic chops were no fluke when Stephen Spielberg cast her as a lovestruck teenager in his overblown spectacle 1941 (1979); and as a naive car buyer in Zemeckis' funny Kurt Russell outing Used Cars (1980).

As hilarious as she was in those films, Sperber earned her pop culture stripes when she played Amy Cassidy in the cult comedy series Bosom Buddies (1980-82). This strange sitcom, about two pals (Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari), who dressed in drag so they could live in an all-girls residential hotel might have had a flimsy premise - but the actors played it to the hilt. Hanks and Scolari were fine, but Sperber stole the series with her incredible physical display of pratfalls, comic sprints, splits and facial mugging. Indeed, here was one comedic performer who was not afraid to go all out for a laugh. Even after the cancellation of the show, Sperber continued to work in comedies throughout the decade: Bachelor Party (1984), Moving Violations, and in Back to the Future (both 1985).

Tragically, Sperber's career was halted in 1997 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. After a brief remission, she played a cancer survivor in a final season episode of Murphy Brown (1997-98). The warm reception she received from her appearance influenced her decision to become an active campaigner for cancer awareness and fundraising. The culmination of her humanitarian efforts resulted in 2001, when she founded weSPARK Cancer Support Center in Sherman Oaks, a nonprofit center that provides free emotional support, research information and social activities for cancer victims and their families. Despite her altruistic causes, Sperber still found time in recent years to make guest appearances on such hit television shows like Will & Grace and 8 Simple Rules...for Dating My Teenage Daughter. She is survived by a son, Preston; a daughter, Pearl; parents, Charlene and Burt; sisters, Ellice and Michelle; and a brother, Richard.

by Michael T. Toole
Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)

Wendie Jo Sperber (1958-2005)

Wendie Jo Sperber, the zany comic actress who had appeared on several movies and sitcoms since the late '70s, died on November 29 of breast cancer at her Sherman Oaks home. She was 47. Born on September 18, 1958 in Hollywood, California, Sperber made an impression from the beginning when, at just 19 years of age, she was cast as Rosie Petrofsky, the hyperactive, dreamy-eyed Beatle fan who will stop at nothing to see them on their Ed Sullivan debut in the charming Robert Zemeckis' period comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978). The film was a surprise smash in the Spring of '78, and she proved that her comic chops were no fluke when Stephen Spielberg cast her as a lovestruck teenager in his overblown spectacle 1941 (1979); and as a naive car buyer in Zemeckis' funny Kurt Russell outing Used Cars (1980). As hilarious as she was in those films, Sperber earned her pop culture stripes when she played Amy Cassidy in the cult comedy series Bosom Buddies (1980-82). This strange sitcom, about two pals (Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari), who dressed in drag so they could live in an all-girls residential hotel might have had a flimsy premise - but the actors played it to the hilt. Hanks and Scolari were fine, but Sperber stole the series with her incredible physical display of pratfalls, comic sprints, splits and facial mugging. Indeed, here was one comedic performer who was not afraid to go all out for a laugh. Even after the cancellation of the show, Sperber continued to work in comedies throughout the decade: Bachelor Party (1984), Moving Violations, and in Back to the Future (both 1985). Tragically, Sperber's career was halted in 1997 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. After a brief remission, she played a cancer survivor in a final season episode of Murphy Brown (1997-98). The warm reception she received from her appearance influenced her decision to become an active campaigner for cancer awareness and fundraising. The culmination of her humanitarian efforts resulted in 2001, when she founded weSPARK Cancer Support Center in Sherman Oaks, a nonprofit center that provides free emotional support, research information and social activities for cancer victims and their families. Despite her altruistic causes, Sperber still found time in recent years to make guest appearances on such hit television shows like Will & Grace and 8 Simple Rules...for Dating My Teenage Daughter. She is survived by a son, Preston; a daughter, Pearl; parents, Charlene and Burt; sisters, Ellice and Michelle; and a brother, Richard. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1984

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1984

Re-released in United States on Video June 28, 1990

Released in United States June 1984 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1984

Re-released in United States on Video June 28, 1990